Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

8

There are a lot of possibility how to mov 0 in to ax under IA32... lea eax, [0] mov eax, 0FFFF0000h //All constants form 0..0FFFFh << 16 shr eax, 16 //All constants form 16..31 shl eax, 16 //All constants form 16..31 And perhaps the most strange... :) @movzx: movzx eax, byte ptr[@movzx + ...


8

You can wade through the intel docs to work it out yourself, or you can use a disassembler which is far easier. The answer is: mov ES, EAX I use yasm, and did the following: # assemble the two bytes: echo 'lbl: db 0x8e, 0xc0' | yasm -f elf - -o tmp.o # disassemble the output: objdump -d -M intel tmp.o If you want to do this by hand, the bytes can by ...


7

I find it's a better approach to disassemble the object files rather than use assembly code generated by gcc. First, generate an object file from your source code: gcc -fno-asynchronous-unwind-tables -s -c -o main.o main.c -fno-asynchronous-unwind-tables: do not generate unnecessary sections like .eh_frame -s: make smaller executable (strip) -c -o: ...


6

STACK16_SIZE dup (?) means to duplicate the data in parenthesis by STACK16_SIZE times. It is equivalent to writing ?, ?, ?, ?, ... (100h times) The data in parens is "uninitialized data". That is, memory is allocated, by not set to any particular value on load.


6

pretty sure the reason is that you can't use the DX register as a pointer. try instead using [si], [di] or [bx]: lea bx, data0 mov al, [bx]


6

Looks like DOS-code, trying to fill the (text) screen buffer or so ..., IIRC ax would be character (0x20 == ' ' == space) combined with the text attributes (0x17 == foreground/background color). The 2000 would be 80x25 ;) es would for this purpose point to the screen buffer. L2: mov es:[bx],ax add bx,2 loop L2 moves the character and attribute (in ax) ...


5

Here DIV's dividend is a 32-bit values taken from DX (top 16 bits) and AX (low 16 bits). You need to zero out DX before every DIV to avoid reusing remainders as part of the dividend. Also, start using a debugger. It helps.


5

Intel syntax means Intel syntax, not NASM syntax. MASM and TASM syntaxes are based on Intel Syntax, NASM syntax gets inspiration from Intel syntax, but it is different. What gcc outputs is actually gas syntax using Intel syntax for individual instructions, (Assembler directives, labels et al. use gas-specific syntax)


5

In BIOS function 6, BH contains an 8-bit color. Its lower 4 bits specify the foreground color while the upper 4 bits specify the background color. Try, for example, mov bh, 14h instead of mov bh, 4h. It should start writing red on blue instead of red on black.


5

If the FPU is as old as a 8087 you have to put a fwait instruction after the fdiv. Otherwise you may read a result from the FPU while the FPU is still executing the division and the result you write back is undefined. This 'feature' has been removed in the 80287 FPU.


5

There aren't so much differences, but there are some. Check out this article: http://faqs.cs.uu.nl/na-dir/assembly-language/x86/borland.html Look for 'ideal' mode; btw, TASM can work with MASM syntax.


5

If you're lazy: https://github.com/diogovk/c2nasm There I have a script that does Babken Vardanyan's suggestion automatically.


5

Yes, CS is directly accessible. IP, however, isn't. The usual trick is to do a CALL instruction which will place it on the stack: mov dx, cs ; save cs into dx call next next: pop ax ; place ip of "next" into ax, adjust as necessary Of course this is only needed if the load address is not known.


4

Windows XP mode provides an emulated 32-bit XP install which can run 16-bit NE and DOS programs. DosBox is a very good DOS emulator which can run most DOS programs, both real-mode and protected mode. Even Windows 3.x! It can also share a directory with the host so it's very easy to use. MS-DOS Player by Toshiya Takeda can run many simple DOS programs, as ...


4

From the documentation: Unsigned binary division of accumulator by source. If the source divisor is a byte value then AX is divided by src and the quotient is placed in AL and the remainder in AH. If source operand is a word value, then DX:AX is divided by src and the quotient is stored in AX and the remainder in DX.


4

para This is the segment alignment. para is short for "paragraph", which in this context means 16 bytes. So you're aligning the segment on a 16 byte boundary. public This is the segment combine type. public means that all segments with this name should be concatenated into a single segment. use16 This means that the segment will use 16-bit encoding for ...


4

When converting numbers to a printable format it's often easiest to start with the last digit. Consider converting 123 to "123", how would we get the last digit? It's the remained when dividing by 10 (the base). So 123 % 10 gives us 3 and 123 / 10 = 12 conveniently gives us the correct number to work with in the next iteration. On x86 the "DIV" instruction ...


3

Take a look here. AX will contain the transmission parameters (baud rate etc) and DX chooses the port number. E3 = 9600 rate, no parity, two stop bits, 8 bits char size.


3

It depends on what you mean by "two first bits set." The code you've written works fine if you're looking for the two lowest-order bits. That is, bit 0 and bit 1 are set. The example you give in the comments (3, 6, 7), probably outputs 3 and 7 because they have their lowest-order two bits set. That is: 3 = 00000011 binary 6 = 00000110 binary 7 = ...


3

A couple more possibilities: sub ax, ax movxz, eax, ah Edit: I should note that the movzx doesn't zero all of eax -- it just zero's ah (plus the top 16 bits that aren't accessible as a register in themselves). As for being the fastest, if memory serves the sub and xor are equivalent. They're faster than (most) others because they're common enough that ...


3

You are already doing what needs to be done in the given ASM. You can push the current value of CX to the stack (save it) and pop it later on to restore it. You would need to do this when you require additional nesting. In the code JohnB provided he simply added in a loop to print out the spaces before printing the asterisks. No additional nesting is ...


3

Just giving it a try, though I'm not sure, and I can't quickly test this. But instead of using two loops I'd recommend using one for the whole bunch of numbers. Furthermore I have the feeling that the problem has to do with the DAA instruction, which I'm not used to, since it is not supported in 64 bit mode. Anyway, here's what I'd do: mov cx,20 ...


3

8086 code only allowed an immediate of 1 (or cl) for a count on shifts and rotates. To enable 286 code, tell Tasm ".286" at the top of your file. That's a guess. The way I remember I used to print a two-digit number in al: aam add ax, 3030h xchg al, ah int 29h mov al, ah int 29h


3

So you just want to print 0 ... 20 as ASCII characters? It looks like you understand that the numerals are identified as 0x30 ... 0x39 for '0' to '9', so you could use integer division to generate the character for the tens digit: I usually work with C but conversion to assembler shouldn't be too complicated since these are all fundamental operations and ...


3

Local symbols isn't enabled by default. To enable it, the LOCALS directive is needed in the source. This directive must be placed in its own line and can be used multiple times. It needs one parameter that consist of two characters. This text will be used as the prefix for all local symbols. For example: LOCALS @@ or LOCALS ZZ


3

Note that the MASM syntax for include is simply include file.asm i.e. without the quotes. AFAIK MASM is the default mode for TASM Reference page 37 and 39 of the TASM 5 users guide


3

? means no particular value, uninitialized. DUP means duplicate. So you get 100h bytes that are uninitialized.


3

In the DOS codepage 437 (and most others) the white smiley face is code #1, and the black one is code #2. So these are the values you need to put into DL. MOV AH, 6 MOV DL, 1; print ☺ INT 21H


3

TASM = Turbo Assembler (a Borland product) MASM = Macro Assembler (a Microsoft product)...often mistaken for "Microsoft Assembler" In terms of raw assembly language, they should be virtually identical, as they both use x86 op-code instructions. The differences "should" be syntactic sugar. An assembly tutorial that uses TASM: ...


3

That DOS function retrieves a buffer with user input. See this table. It seems that program is using that call to pause execution waiting for the user to resume the program. Edit: I just reread the question. I thought you were only asking what the function call did in your given source. If you want to read input of no more than 20 characters, you first need ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible