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4

They are NOT the same, and they DO NOT work the same way. They take very different approaches to socket API interactions, event handling, error handling, etc. TClientSocket and TServerSocket are the original VCL-based (Windows-specific) socket components. They were deprecated in Delphi 7 and no longer installed by default, but are still available for ...


3

You must understand what the "address" parameter of opening a server socket does. Sockets only listen to connections on a particular interface, represented by the network address. In your manifest, you allowed your app to bind the socket to any interface with "listen": "*". However, inn this line: chrome.sockets.tcpServer.listen(createInfo.socketId, ...


2

In Windows, you can wake up a blocking accept call from another thread simply by calling closesocket. The blocking accept call will return -1 and your code has a chance to break out of whatever loop it is in by checking some other exit condition that you have already set (e.g. global variable) This also works with Mac (and likely BSD derivatives) with the ...


2

TIdTCPServer is a multi-threaded component. Each client runs in its own worker thread. ADO is a set of apartment-threaded COM objects. You cannot share them across thread boundaries unless you marshal them. You will have to either: give each thread its own database connection and query components. Optionally put the objects in a pool to control the ...


2

The streambuf::data() member-function returns buffers representing the input sequence. To avoid accessing the data again, one can use the streambuf::consume() member-function to remove characters from the beginning of the input sequence. In this case, once data has been copied from input_buffer_ to msgstr, the input sequence can be cleared with: ...


2

The loop continues because Indy exceptions are not handled correctly. Either remove the exception handler, or re-raise the exception after logging: except on e : Exception do begin MainForm.Log('error in Execute=' + e.Message); raise; end; end; p.s. accessing the MainForm from the server thread is not thread-safe. There are many solutions ...


2

Unlike in TClientSocket and other socket library implementations, the OnReceive event in TTcpClient DOES NOT trigger when there is new data available to be read. It is only triggered when ReceiveBuf() is called (which Receiveln() uses internally). So there is no point in calling Receiveln() inside of OnReceive since you have to be in a reading operation to ...


2

I see no evidence that this question is about TcpListener at all. It seems you are only concerned with the code that deals with a connection that already has been accepted. Such a connection is independent of the listener. SocketAsyncEventArgs is a CPU-load optimization. I'm convinced you can achieve a higher rate of operations per second with it. How ...


2

It's a fork bomb because of this part: while (1) { pid = fork(); if (pid == 0) { /* child */ ...read()...write()... } else { /* parent */ close(comm_fd); } } This is an infinite loop where the parent keeps forking and closing comm_fd. Each child, after a successful read and write, will in turn fork in the next ...


2

Basically, don't use a thread per socket; use one of the async APIs (BeginReceive / ReceiveAsync), or some kind of socket polling (Socket.Select for example, although note that this is implemented in a very awkward way; when I use this, I actually use P/Invoke to get to the raw underlying API). Right at this moment, I have > 30k sockets per process talking ...


2

There are two key ways of handling multiple sockets. The first is - making use of IO::Select - which has a can_read function - this allows you to test whether a socket has data to read, and you can just iterate your socket list. Read the doc on IO::Select, as it has an example of how to do exactly what you're wanting. The other approach is parallel ...


1

Try sending a newline character to match the readLine statement on the server-side strEcho := "Hello\n"


1

Here's a working example server application which has Socket.accept() outside the loop: class (threading.Thread): def listenForClients(self, sock): while True: client, address = sock.accept() client.settimeout(5) threading.Thread( target = self.listenToClient, args = (client,address) ).start() def ...


1

Perhaps I am misunderstanding the question, but have you tried setting a timeout in the socket with "Timeout"? See IO::Socket::INET. EDIT: I did not catch the 'recv' bit. You have to use setsockopt, which is not wholly portable, so the final answer is somewhat dependent on your platform. Here are some posts that may help: How do I set `SO_RCVTIMEO` on a ...


1

If you just want to read a line then use StreamReader on your NetworkStream and then call the ReadLine method provided by it. Something like this NetworkSTream strm = client.GetStream(); var reader = new StreamReader(strm); var line = reader.ReadLine()


1

TCP is not message based. It provides a stream of bytes. It is your responsibility to separate messages. Also note, that you might receive only a part of a message in one Read call. Here's a simple way to do that: Send the messages as individual lines. Possibly using StreamWriter. Receive the messages using StreamReader.ReadLine(). That way you can also ...


1

Somehow, stating the host as 127.0.0.1 was causing the problem. I removed it and made the server listen on just the port alone i.e. listen(port). After doing this, I was able to detect that the port was open and then my program on the remote computer was able to communicate bidirectionally with the virtual machine.


1

It's a fork bomb because you never terminates the child, so it continues to run by looping in the while where accept() gives an error but doesn't terminates the process. So it continues to fork() and doing so forever. Modify the code like this: if (pid == 0) { close (listen_fd); bzero (str, 256); n = read (comm_fd, str, 255); if (n < ...


1

Ok figured out the issue. An xpc service provides you with a default run loop of type dispatch_main. You want to substitute that with an NSRunLoop - done by changing the xpc service info plist: https://developer.apple.com/library/mac/documentation/MacOSX/Conceptual/BPSystemStartup/Chapters/CreatingXPCServices.html Once that is done, you want to manually ...


1

There is nothing wrong with the code you have shown, so the problem has to be in the code you have not shown. The way I see it, there are two possibilities: If you are not setting wantedHost and/or wantedPort to the correct values, you would not actually be connecting to your expected server. If extractClientName() is getting stuck internally and not ...


1

I've tested many web socket examples .... From what you describe you did not use "web sockets" but simply "sockets", e.g. direct TCP/IP. WebSockets (e.g. what you call "HTML web sockets") are different: they are used to create something socket like over an established HTTP connection. Therefore you see the HTTP query with the "Upgrade: websocket" ...


1

The execute method is called in a loop for the duration of the TCP connection. This would be ok for a server push application (except that the message sending should be throttled to avoid overloading the server). If you want to implement a request/reply protocol, start with a ReadLn (or any other Read method which matches your protocol). This will block ...


1

TIdHTTPServer does not trigger an OnCommand... event until it has read a complete HTTP request from the client. Your TIdTCPServer is not reading any requests at all. TIdTCPServer.OnExecute is a looped event. It is triggered continuously for the lifetime of the connection. It is the event handler's responsibility to decide what to do on each loop ...


1

Yes, the BaseServer.shutdown() method is thread-safe. The serve_forever method serves until the shutdown flag is set, and it is shutdown()s task to set that flag. The method states, in the docstring: Blocks until the loop has finished. This must be called while serve_forever() is running in another thread, or it will deadlock. Note that this has ...


1

You should structure your program differently depending on what you want to accomplish and what your network protocol looks like. I'm assuming you're using a custom stateless protocol for this example. commands = [] data = self.request.recv(BUFF) commands = data.split('#') process_commands(commands) def process_commands(commands): """ Determines if ...


1

I can't understand why the listen() function doesn't block the process Because it isn't a blocking function. It puts the port into the LISTEN state. It is accept() which is the blocking function, which you should be calling next. which goes straight ahead to the connect() which fails giving me error 22 - Invalid argument. Because the socket is in ...


1

First off, do your best not to even learn this. If you can possibly use a SignalR server, then do so. There is no such thing as a "simple" socket server at the TCP/IP level. If you insist on the painful route (i.e., learning proper TCP/IP server design), then there's a lot to learn. First, the MSDN examples are notoriously bad starting points; they barely ...


1

No, this is not possible to do in general. HTTP solves this problem by the client including a Host: header in the request sent to the server, so the server can tell which hostname the client intends to connect to. Without this, you just have an incoming TCP connection to a specific address without any other information about how the client got the address.


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First of all, the lstn.bind(('IP', PORT)) and lstn.listen(5) methods should be called only once, outside the loop. Inside the loop, you should call only (clnt,ap) = lstn.accept(). Besides, you are instantiating a new thread to listen do clients messages only ONCE, outside the loop, so you will only be able to call thread_receive.start() ONCE, the second ...


1

With traditional blocking I/O, each connection must be handled by one or more dedicated threads. As the number of connections grows so does the number of required threads. This model works reasonably well with connection numbers into the hundreds or low thousands, but it doesn't scale well past that. Multiplexing and non-blocking I/O invert the model, ...



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