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I know this question has been answered repeatedly, but for this I've taken the main answer from John T's answer and modified it so it contains the suggested flush and followed its linked revised version. I've also added the enter and exit as mentioned in cladmi's answer for use with the with statement. In addition, the documentation mentions to flush files ...


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I solved the issue by making my own pipe reader/server similar to this, except the server can output to as many clients as it chooses.


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I don't have IMPDP in order to test it how it works. So, "logfile=logdir:imp.log" generates a imp.log file, right? you want the content of this file inside of MY.LOG? Try: TYPE imp.log >> my.log If IMPDP write the info in the console you can try adding ">> my.log" at the end of the command line instead.


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For a very similar purpose I use GNU screen which offer the option to record everything you do in a shell session (INPUT/OUTPUT). The log it creates also comes with undesirable characters but I clean them with perl: perl -ne 's/\x1b[[()=][;?0-9]*[0-9A-Za-z]?//g;s/\r//g;s/\007//g;print' < screenlog.0 I hope this helps. Some features of screen: ...


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I question the actual utility of recording the commands that you execute on a local or remote machine. The reason is that there is so much state which is not visible from a command log. As a simple example here's a log of two commands: 17:00$ cp important_file important_file.bak 17:15$ rm important_file and two days later you are trying to figure out ...


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In the Unix world there are two primary modes of handling keyboard input. These are known as 'raw' in which characters are passed from the terminal to the reading program one at a time. This is the mode that editors (and such) will use because the editor needs to respond immediately when you press a key. The other terminal discipline is called 'cooked' ...


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I have not tested this, but you should be able to do something like this with named pipes. You write a VBscript called splitter.vbs that reads its stdin and writes to two named pipes, then start your two other processes telling them to read from the pipes. proc1 | cscript /nologo splitter.vbs proc2 -i \\.\pipe\p1 proc3 -i \\.\pipe\p2 Depending on whether ...


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The problem is most likely that grep is buffering its output — selecting large chunks of input, filtering them, and outputting the result — so it handles the output of yes smoothly (because yes quickly generates a lot of input for it to filter and output), whereas your ssh command probably doesn't generate as much output as quickly. Many ...


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The fact that the solutions in that question aren't working for you is informative: the real issue that you are experiencing is that Tcl commands do not normally write to stdout anyway (except for puts, which has that as its main job, and parray, which is a procedure that uses puts internally). The “write to stdout” that you are used to is a feature of the ...



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