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What's the message of the exception? Any inner exceptions? Are you using the correct IP address (IPv4 or IPv6?)? Also, you have to read from the stream as well. However, your issue is most likely using the wrong TcpClient constructor. The one that takes the endpoint is a listener, not a client. You have to use the hostname + port overload. That is, try ...


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conduit doesn't make any assumptions about character encoding, the functions you're using from that gist all operate purely at the binary level. It seems like the telnet server you're connecting to is (unsurprisingly) sending out non-ASCII data as special commands, and you're sending them directly to the terminal, which does not have any way to display them. ...


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Expect is an extension of TCL, so you have access to all of TCL's constructs. If I were you I would have the expect script write directly to a file. See the section "Writing a file" here: http://wiki.tcl.tk/367. It has a simple example for just that. In your case, you will want to open the file for append (a) instead of write (w). open command ...


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Found the reason myself, so for future searchers: telnet automatically adds a CR after each command that is typed and sent with <enter>. However, the python interpreter does not accept the CR (\r) as part of the command and reports a syntax error on that character (\r is non-printable and hence probably invisible in the error message generated by ...


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Instead of using raw sockets, you can use the telnetlib. Typical usage: import getpass import sys import telnetlib HOST = "localhost" user = raw_input("Enter your remote account: ") password = getpass.getpass() tn = telnetlib.Telnet(HOST) tn.read_until("login: ") tn.write(user + "\n") if password: tn.read_until("Password: ") tn.write(password + ...


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I agree with Joachim, calling the read in a loop and parsing for the end out the output is the best approach. Unfortunately for me, my output didn't have a standardize ending for each command I executed. Instead, I used the read timeout of the stream to approximate the end of the output (I realize this isn't perfect). I set a higher initial timeout to ...



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