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1

No, telnet does not send the buffer when you press Enter, it sends every single key you type. Otherwise vi and some other editors won’t work. What makes you believe this is that when you press enter you get a response from the host. For example you type ls –la and when press Enter you get a response, but telnet has sent all the keys one by one but you get ...


4

It's an implementation choice. Basically, with both TCP and UDP you can buffer as much data as you want before sending it out. The target is to maximize payload size so you don't send a single packet for each key you type, something that you can easily achieve with a customized Java telnet client that flush()es a socket on each character. Telnet was born ...


0

I would do it with regular expressions: import re array = [] lines = output.split('\n') for line in lines: # Read lines from CPU MEM TEMP if re.search('example1', line): line = re.sub(r'\s+', ' ', line) for word in line.split(' '): array.append(word) print array This code prints the next output: ['example1', ...


0

You need to split the output in lines first (I'm assuming the lines are separated by a newline): for line in output.splitlines(): # Read lines from CPU MEM TEMP if "example1" in line: for word in line.split(): array.append(word) (Edit: replaced .split('\n') with .splitlines() as per @PaulMcGuire 's suggestion)


0

You are mixing things up. UNIX sockets are one thing: they use objects in the file system which have paths and can be addressed with them. TCP/IP sockets are another thing. You can do the same over them, but you address them differently. With telnet, you would do telnet -u 192.168.10.5 and with socat it is like socat -v READLINE TCP:192.168.10.5:23 ...


0

You're mixing shell and expect syntax. You need: log_file $filename send "<data access command>\r" sleep [expr {$delay+5}] But your objective is unclear. Where is the "simultaneous" script?


0

I have resolved the problem by adding a while-loop to print each line after a new line and carriage return has been read in: import telnetlib HOST = "10.10.10.71" tn = telnetlib.Telnet(HOST, port=55555, timeout=60) tn.read_until(b"mpa:?") tn.write(b'v' + b'\n\r') while True: line = tn.read_until(b"\n\r") # Check for new line and CR print(line) ...


1

In some installations, telnet is not 8-bit clean by default (It does not recognize 8-bit character encodings such as Unicode). In order to be able to send Unicode keystrokes to the remote host, you need to set telnet into "outbinary" mode. There are two ways to do this: $ telnet -L <host> and $ telnet telnet> set outbinary telnet> open ...


0

If you are to use telnet for connecting to a mail server using tls then you will have to perform handshake operations manually. But these handshake operations can be automated by using an open source library which implements TLS. One such library is 'OpenSSL'. Below is the openssl command using which you can try connecting to the mail server using tls ...


0

Your understanding of how adb protocol works is wrong. Either read the specs or just see what exchange is really happening when you run any adb shell commands: C:\>set ADB_TRACE=1 C:\>adb shell date system/core/adb/adb.c::main():Handling commandline() system/core/adb/commandline.c::adb_commandline():interactive shell loop. buff=shell:date ...


0

The pid you are trying to kill is the pid of the grep since $! is the pid of the most recently executed background command. If you hadn't thrown away stderr when trying to kill it might have provided some clue... BTW, kill -9 is a serious code smell. Any well behaved process can be killed by at least one of the -INT, -HUP, -TERM or -QUIT signals. You should ...


0

After enabling the Telnet Client, it didn't work for me right on the Command Prompt. What I had to do: Open the telnet prompt (Search programs, type "telnet.exe", or just "telnet" in C:\WINDOWS\system32). On the telnet prompt, type "o localhost 5554".


0

Have you tried to use the ip address of "mail" instead of the hostname. Network devices on Win 7 use ipv4 and ipv6 by default. If you specify the computername (not the DNS entry of the machine) while opening a connection (i.e. starting telnet) than "mail" may be resolved to either the ipv4 or the ipv6 address of that machine (more or less) at random. If ...


0

Have you checked the firewall settings? If your firewall isn't allowing connections from external addresses to port 25, but is allowing local connections to port 25, then that'd explain why PHP can use it just fine but you can't connect from the outside.


0

TL-MR3220 doesn't have SSH/Telnet enabled and it is blocked in the kernel with the default firmware. However, if you flash the Router with a Third party firmware then you can access this via SSH or Telnet. Here is a guide to install OpenWRT on the MR3220. https://gist.github.com/sepastian/6712039


1

Looks like your telnet is not installed. Simply execute the below command in your command prompt and wait till the mouse progress icon disappears. It works on windows 7. I am not sure on other machines pkgmgr /iu:"TelnetClient"


0

Okay, after finally phrasing my google queries correctly, I found what I needed here: Force telnet client into character mode The basic solution is that I forced the client into character at a time mode and echo'd back the characters I care about. The bonus to this is that now I can do tab completion, command history, and make the passwords not show up. ...


0

Maybe pexpect is what you're looking for? This snippet will start a ping process, and block until it sees the output "bytes from" or until it times out (1 minute by default): import pexpect def wait_until_online(host, timeout=60): child = pexpect.spawn("ping %s" % host) child.expect("bytes from", timeout)


1

Your script has several syntax errors and I do not think you've made any attempt at researching IMAP syntax at all. send "1 login picard enterprise\r" This is correct provided that the login and password don't contain spaces or other odd characters, and that Expect actually sends \r\n when you type \r there. send "2 list '' '*'\r" '' is not IMAP, IMAP ...


1

AFAIK, you won't be able to automate telnet that way. But it is still possible - even if it is a very bad idea (I'll elaborate on that later). First why does your try fail : you launched a telnet command reading from stdin (I suppose terminal) and writing to stdout and stderr (I suppose also a terminal) if your telnet is reasonably recent, it tries to ...


0

ctrl+a = decimal 1 ctrl+b = decimal 2 ctrl+c = decimal 3 and so on.. to ctrl+x = decimal 24 ctrl+y = decimal 25 ctrl+z = decimal 26 escape = 27 etc Still, for those who will need this in the future Arrow keys are (3 bytes, decimal) UP ARROW is 27,91,65 (ESC,'[',A) DOWN ARROW is 27,91,66 (ESC,'[',B) RIGHT ARROW is 27,91,67 (ESC, '[',C) LEFT ARROW is ...


1

Have you tried using the expect command ?? You will have to create a script where you identify the 'expected' response from the server e.g. 'Password:' and then supply the password in the script. The following will explain: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Expect - A good example is also shown here: ...


0

I found the answer. After typing the command, leave 1 line blank and then on the next line enter kntrl+v kntrl+m


0

From the STOMP spec: CONNECT login: <username> passcode:<passcode> ^@ The ^@ is a null (control-@ in ASCII) byte. The entire thing will be called a Frame in this doc. The frame starts with a command (in this case CONNECT), followed by a newline, followed by headers in a : with each header followed by a newline. A blank line ...


1

It is impossible to disable telnet echo using telnetlib.py in it's current state. telnetlib.py automatically responds to IAC commands for you. (See telnetlib.process_rawq()) Unfortunately, it is a simple implementation that just negatively responds to incoming requests. When you connect, the remote end will send IAC WILL ECHO and your end will reply with ...


0

Okey mate , here is the code you are looking for , but focus : Dim Full_Stop As String = "" Dim TelnetClient As New TcpClient Private Sub StartButton_Click(sender As Object, e As EventArgs) Handles StartButton.Click TelnetClient.Connect("IP ADDRESS", 23) 'Connecting to the IP Given Send_Sub("Start Connection Command") Dim thr As New ...


2

92 120 56 48 13 10 is in decimal ASCII: \ x 8 0 \r \n So you are doing something very wrong and it's not the Telnet. The escape sequence \x80 was treated literally instead of being understood as single character of code=128. I guess you have used '\x80' instead of "\x80". Note the different quotes. If that was a single character, you can in Ruby ...


1

Don't have enough rep to comment Are you aware, that line-endings in (escapes are octal) Windows are CR+LF (\015\012) Linux is only LF (\012) the additional RETURN you have to enter, after CTRL-X, may be necessary after each executed command? If it is like this, the gateway would encounter a concatenation of all sent strings, trying to parse them, ...


1

Telnet.expect accepts a list of regular expressions: tn.expect([r"\w+ login: "])


0

Twisted's LineReceiver and LineOnlyReceiver only support one line ending delimiter. Here is code for UniversalLineReceiver and UniversalLineOnlyReceiver, which override the dataReceived() method with support for universal line endings (any combination of CR+LF, CR or LF). The line breaks are detected with the regular expression object delimiter_re. Note, ...


0

As far I know, you must set your telnet terminal type as TERMINAL_TYPE=vt200 in order to send function keys.


0

It you use python-memcached, and would like to export all the items in memcache server, I summerized two methods to the problem in this question: Export all keys and values from memcached with python-memcache


1

Set Telnetmode to 0. If Telnetmode is on then CR is translated to CR + 0x00. From the Net::Telnet source: ## Convert all CR (not followed by LF) to CR NULL. while (($pos = index($$string, "\015", $pos)) > -1) { $nextchar = substr $$string, $pos + 1, 1; substr($$string, $pos, 1) = "\015\000" unless $nextchar eq "\012"; You can turn the mode on ...


1

Maybe you're actually making a Telnet connection? But then it closes because the server finds no interesting conversation, because the server is expecting SSL negotiations to complete. Understand that Telnet is not very different than TCP (][CyberPillar: Telnet may discuss that - full disclosure, I own CyberPillar) So what would you expect the SSL server ...


1

As @EJP said, opening an closing the connection for each line will kill the app... A better approach is have the thread handle the communication(s) and wait for the next line, passing the data back to the main thread as a bundle message. There are plenty of examples out there, but essentially you create a handler in your main thread: Handler handler = ...


-1

This may be of use, you can redirect the outputs from error messages and warning messages into standard out. Example: Invoke-Expression "cmd /c 'C:\Program Files (x86)\PuTTY\plink.exe'$plinkcmd 4>&1 3>&1 2>&1"


1

You can use tn.read_until("\n") in a loop in order to read one line durint execution of your telnet command while True: line = tn.read_until("\n") # Read one line print(line) if 'abcd' in line: # last line, no more read break


0

You can use the ready_very_eager, read_eager, read_lazy, and ready_very_lazy functions specified in the documentation to read your stream byte-by-byte. You can then handle the "until" logic on your own code and at the same time write the read lines to the console.



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