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I had the similar issue. After spending few hours, finally resolved issue by putting below line in code: System.setProperty("java.net.preferIPv4Stack" , "true"); By default, Java uses ipv6, and I was passing ipv4 address. After putting above line, It worked.


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You can try this way too. set user_id {} expect -re {nick=(.*)\s+id=(.*)\s+group=(.*)\s+login=(.*)\n} { #Each submatch will be saved in the the expect_out buffer with the index of 'n,string' for the 'n'th submatch string puts "You have entered : $expect_out(0,string)"; #expect_out(0,string) will have the whole expect match string including ...


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expect lets you match the incoming strings with regular expressions and get the submatches in the expect_out() array. In your example, you could use send "me\r" expect -re {nick=([^ ]*) id=([^ ]*) group=([^ ]*) login=([^ ]*)} set nick $expect_out(1,string) set id $expect_out(2,string) set group $expect_out(3,string) set login $expect_out(4,string) puts ...


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This code will work { echo "3"; echo "6"; sleep 1; } | telnet localhost 8887 How I tested it? Install netcat. Then from one terminal nc -l 8887 And from another terminal type { echo "3"; echo "6"; sleep 1; } | telnet localhost 8887 You will see the number 3 and 6 in the first terminal running nc


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If you use Cisco UCS it has a module for PS management of devices. Not very familiar with it, I just know it exists. http://blogs.cisco.com/tag/powershell/ http://www.cisco.com/c/en/us/td/docs/unified_computing/ucs/sw/msft_tools/powertools/ucs_powertool_book/ucs_pwrtool_bkl1.pdf This guy talks about about some other options too.. ...


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Remove all the Sleeps. You simply can't know how long it will take for the server to respond. Instead, agree upon a marker in the data that is sent from server to client and marks the end of the response. In the GetReplay read from the stream until you encounter the marker and then return. EDIT it looks like the ParseTelnet method tries to do something ...


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How about throwing some additional syntax onto the problem: ( telnet XXX.XXX.XXX.1 >> /home/kristoffer/telnetXXX.XXX.XXX.1.txt ) & ( telnet XXX.XXX.XXX.2 >> /home/kristoffer/telnetXXX.XXX.XXX.2.txt ) & ( telnet XXX.XXX.XXX.3 >> /home/kristoffer/telnetXXX.XXX.XXX.3.txt ) & ( telnet XXX.XXX.XXX.4 >> ...


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I solved this problem by expecting the bash again after I send my command. When ran like this: send "password\r" expect "*$*" send "ls\r" The telnet session immediately ended. What ended up working was to expect the start of the bash script again. Because the script ends after it sends the last command, it doesn't have a chance to display the result of ...


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The bw capability in a termcap terminal description says whether moving left at the edge of a screen wraps to the previous line. It was present in a PuTTy description I checked (infocmp putty under ncurses), but not in many others (e.g. not in infocmp gnome). You could try to keep track of which column the cursor is in and use movement control sequences ...


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So it turns out I can blame this one on the device. When I sniffed the traffic to putty and executed the same sequence of commands exactly as the Java app does, I was able to reproduce the issue. It is a bug I will need to track down in the firmware. Thank you to @Adam and @MrunalGosar for your input.


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The problem may be because you are sending the ls command before expecting a terminal , the code expect "*$*" expects a terminal after you enter the password and the regular expression (*$*) may vary depending upon the PS1 environment variable of the telnet session, below is the code which will the list the contents of the current working directory and logs ...


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Try this: telnet set localecho open <host ip> <port> see this question


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TL;DR Set 'Binmode' => true and use Encoding::BINARY. The above should work for you. If you're interested in why, read on. Telnet doesn't really have a concept of "encoding." Telnet just has two modes: Normal mode assumes you're sending 7-bit ASCII characters, and binary mode assumes you're sending 8-bit bytes. You can't tell Telnet "this is UTF-8" ...


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The code works, but doesn't send/receive from the client. The following modest change makes the server send beer tasty to any lucky clients. source ''' Simple socket server using threads ''' import socket import sys HOST = '' # Symbolic name, meaning all available interfaces PORT = 8888 # Arbitrary non-privileged port s = ...


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Check this out. var net = require('net'); var client = net.connect(parseInt(process.argv[3]),process.argv[2],function(){ client.setEncoding('utf8'); console.log('Connected!!'); client.on('data',function(chunk){ console.log(chunk); }); process.stdin.resume(); // Activate STDIN process.stdin.setEncoding('utf8'); // Set it to ...


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You should really expect something before you send something, to get the timing right. Something like: exp_internal 1 ;# expect internal debugging. remove when not needed spawn telnet host expect "login: " send "username\r" expect "Password: " send "password\r" set prompt {\$ $} ;# this is a regular expression to match the *end* of ...


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I tried the expect command, but it didn't work, after some research, trial and error I figured out the following: Use expect "prompt>\r" instead of expect "prompt>" Curly braces need to be on the same line as expect command, like this expect "prompt>\r" { Use set timeout -1 to wait for the prompt infinitely, instead of 10 seconds So, the answer ...


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The expect command of expect seems appropriate here. Something like expect "prompt\n" followed by the sending of the logout. As a note, if this is a normal telnet system you should generally wait to be prompted for username and password before just sending it over. See how to automate telnet session using expect or expect script to automate telnet login


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I've been holding off on answering because there are a couple different things going on here -- Google doesn't have a telnet server running on port 80, it's a web (HTTP) server. You're connecting to the webserver with your telnet client and trying to talk over HTTP with plain text. HTTP and telnet are two different protocols. So there is a mismatch between ...



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