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2

With bash: replace "servername" by your telnet server: echo "Hello" > /dev/tcp/servername/23


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Sounds like you can use Netcat on the telnet port. An example would go like so: echo -n 'some string to telnet' | nc <server> 23


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Since you mentioned python, pexpect should do the job pretty well: https://pexpect.readthedocs.org/en/latest/overview.html


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We changed the API. Mike Pennington only recently introduced the new connect_timeout parameter for that specific use case. New solution (current master, latest release on pypi 2.1.451): conn = Telnet(connect_timeout=3) We changed the API because you usually don't want to wait for unreachable devices, but want to wait for commands to finish (some take a ...


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The server side of Telnet is typically just a regular shell so you can do the same things you'd do for embedded newlines as if you were typing at a command line. Try this: echo -e "this\nhas\nmultiple\nlines" | program (you may need to look up flags for the echo command on the server if it's not a GNU machine)


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The solution i found is to send the powershell command as 1st argument. for example if i want to send 'host' command to the powershell i'll send: 'powershell host'


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While I think your design is a good one I also think it may be overly complicated for what you are trying to do. If multiple classes are going to be using the same NetManager instance then you are going to have to implement some sort of locking and/or queuing so only one class tries to access NetManager at a time. Then you will also have to figure out some ...


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You may safely respond negatively to each IAC negotiation request. That is, for each IAC-DO, reply IAC-WONT. For each IAC-WILL, reply IAC-DONT. You may find this code helpful: def read(s): while True: data = s.recv(10240) for do in re.findall('\xff\xfd.', data): # IAC DO cmd s.send('\xff\xfc'+do[2]) # IAC WONT cmd ...


1

00 is "binary transmission" meaning that it's an 8-bit connection. 40 is not something that is standardized but whatever it is, the client doesn't want to do it. Either side of a "telnet" connection can send configuration negotiation options upon establishing the connection (or, though rarely, any time during the session) though typically the client ...


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There is no guarantee data will be sent in one block. You need to read in a loop until '\n' is found or buffer limit reached. Something like: size_t size=0; do { if((n = read(idntef, _buf+size, 512-size)) < 0) { _print(stderr, "messages.socketreadfail", cfg, 1); _exit(0); } size += n; } while(strchr(_buf, '\n') == NULL ...


1

Telnet, unless it negotiates parameters to the contrary, does "remote echo" meaning that you won't see anything you type unless the server echos it back. A lot of people use the term "Telnet" when really it is a raw socket connection that does no configuration negotiation upon connect. If you're sending data from a file or source other than the keyboard ...


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I couldn't solve the telnet issue, but I found that the mail command is probably the best solution for this. easy to use and change: echo “This will go into the body of the mail.” | mail -s “Hello world” you@youremailid.com This allows test emails to be sent, and bypasses telnet.


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As Etan commented, telnet is eating the rest of your input. The fix is to redirect the input for telnet. Change this: telnet $host $port > ~/test_con/telnet_test.txt to this: telnet $host $port </dev/null > ~/test_con/telnet_test.txt


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Don'ts: You don't need a telnet server on CentOS to test Postfix via telnet. You don't need to disable SELinux. You don't need xinetd. Do's: Install a telnet client on your client machine (if using Windows, take PuTTY). Ensure that Postfix on CentOS is bound to your primary or to all IP address(es). Open Port 25 in iptables. Telnet from your client and ...


1

See Java: What's the difference between Thread start() and Runnable run() Looks like you are calling run() directly instead of via start().


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You can try this an example: include <SPI.h> #include <Ethernet.h> #include <CapSense.h> // Enter a MAC address and IP address for your controller below. // The IP address will be dependent on your local network: byte mac[] = { 0xDE, 0xAD, 0xBE, 0xEF, 0xFE, 0xED }; byte ip[] = { 192, 168, 84, 3 }; #define encoderGSMask B00000001 #define ...


1

You may be over thinking it. Nearly all muds delimit lines with LF, i.e. \n (some oddball servers will use CRLF, \r\n, or even \n\r). So buffer your input and scan for the delimiter \n. When you find one, move the line out of the input buffer and then run your regexps. A special case is the telnet command IAC GA, which some muds use to denote prompts. Read ...


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Try using SSH: man ssh Use PuTTY as a client: http://www.putty.org/ http://www.chiark.greenend.org.uk/~sgtatham/putty/download.html


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I've gotten this working by using 'fromEvent' in Baconjs and using 'firstToPromise'. I was getting exceptions thrown from 'fromBinding', so I don't know what was up there, but it slowed down my progress a lot. Below is the simplified and working code. Requires ES6 (I used node flags --harmony and --harmony_generators.) On a side note, I'm hugely excited ...


2

The short answer is: you don't TCP/IP is a serial protocol, that has no notion of packets. If your application layer protocol uses packets (most do), then you have two options: use a transport layer that supports packets natively (UDP, SCTP,...) add packetizing information to your data stream The simplest way to add packetizing info, is by adding ...


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you can keep a stack, add the packets to it, keep testing until you get a full response If the MUD is to be played (almost) exclusively by the client (not telnet itself), you can add delimiters, again have the stack, but don't test blindly, test when you get a delimiter. If there is a command you can send that has no gameplay effect but has a constant ...


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No, this is not possible. The text you're trying to type in is a human-readable representation of a ClientHello message, not the real thing. The real ClientHello message is binary data, and cannot be entered through a Telnet session.


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Answering my own question... I needed to add the correct character encodings to the input and output streams. BufferedReader lrzszin = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(p.getInputStream(), "ISO-8859-1")); BufferedWriter lrzszout = new BufferedWriter(new OutputStreamWriter(p.getOutputStream(), "ISO-8859-1")); BufferedReader ...


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You tagged your question "telnet" but you don't explicitly say you're using telnet to connect remotely. Telnet is not 8-bit clean. It uses "escape" characters to exchange configuration information between the client and server. Your transfer program likely expects a raw connection. You could try implementing basic Telnet support into your application. ...


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Unix login (used by telnet servers) generally do not echo anything (not even stars like web pages) when receiving the login password. The characters are being received, just not echo'd back. When you press enter the server knows you're finished typing a password, re-enables echo, and goes on about actually performing the authentication. If your password ...



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