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6

Yes. Make the function templates and then conditionaly enable them using std::enable_if: #include <type_traits> template <class T> class A { public: template<typename U = T> typename std::enable_if<std::is_same<U,int>::value>::type has_int() {} template<typename U = T> typename ...


5

This is like the posterchild for void_t. template<class ...> using void_t = void; // workaround for some compilers: // template<class...> struct voider { using type = void; }; // template<class... Args> using void_t = typename voider<Args...>::type; template<class T, class = void> struct pointer_type_or_default { using ...


5

Until C++17 and fold expressions come along, the simplest implementation of all_of is probably along the lines of: // base case; actually only used for empty pack template<bool... values> struct all_of : std::true_type {}; // if first is true, check the rest template<bool... values> struct all_of<true, values...> : all_of<values...> ...


5

Every primary and partial specializations static data members must be defined separately. template <int N, int I> const int Table<N, I>::dummy = …; The only thing defined here is Table<N, I>::dummy - the primary specializations static data member. [temp.class.spec.mfunc]/11: Class template partial specialization members that are used ...


4

First, an id-expression naming a nonstatic member function (mem_type::update in this case) can't be used as an unevaluated operand (such as the operand of decltype). §5.1.1 [expr.prim.general]/p13 (footnote omitted): An id-expression that denotes a non-static data member or non-static member function of a class can only be used: as part of a ...


4

You can use partial specialization to get the right type, maybe like this: template <typename T, bool> struct ValueType { using type = T; }; template <typename T> struct ValueType<T, true> { using type = typename T::value_type; }; template <class K> struct A { using T = typename ValueType<K, ...


3

The two branches are evaluated, you may use specialization to solve that: template<int first, int...a> struct min { static const int value = (first > min<a...>::value) ? min<a...>::value : first; }; template<int first> struct min<first> { static const int value = first; };


3

You can easily use partial template specialisation and a trait for this: template <class T> struct TypeForU_Class { typedef T type; }; template <class T> struct TypeForU_Class<std::complex<T>> { typedef T type; }; template <class T> using TypeForU = typename TypeForU_Class<T>::type; template <class K, class ...


3

The short-circuiting behavior of && doesn't stop the compiler from evaluating both expressions. min<a...>::value still has to be well-formed. So when a... becomes empty you end up with an instantiation of min<>, for which no specialization has been defined. You can fix this by specializing for a single parameter: template <int ...


2

Yes, with template specialization : template <class T> class A; template <> class A<int> { void had_int(){} }; template <> class A<char> { void had_char(){} };


2

You may feed manually a traits for that: template <typename A1, typename A2> struct foo_wrap_result; with struct foo_wrap { template <typename A1, typename A2> typename foo_wrap_result<A1, A2>::type operator()(A1 a1, A2 a2) const { return foo(a1, a2); } }; And specialization of the traits: template <> struct ...


2

The problem with one-pass code is that you have to keep the state - you have to remember whether you encountered the dominating element or not. Writing a simple for loop would give you an advantage of short-circuiting when you know that the result is false. But if you want a one-liner, here you go: template<typename T> bool dominates2(const T& ...


1

Well, you can't get a typename from concatenating strings with template parameters, but if your intention is... I'd like to have a metafunction Get_Provider_Type::type which will return for me the type fooProvider You can simply define the type in foo: struct foo { using provider = fooProvider; }; If you need it, you can implement your ...


1

On this line: getArgs<typename func1<int>::operator()>::Type typename func1<int>::operator() is not a type, it's a function. You need to call decltype() on a pointer to it. Use operator& to get a pointer to member: getArgs<decltype(&func1<int>::operator())>::Type


1

If you have a C++11 capable compiler, I find it highly unlikely that you require BOOST_DEDUCED_TYPENAME. i.e., this is located in include/boost/config/suffix.hpp: // BOOST_DEDUCED_TYPENAME workaround ------------------------------------------// // // Some compilers don't support the use of `typename' for dependent // types in deduced contexts, e.g. // // ...


1

The recursive instantiation removes one argument at a time. It goes like this: min<1, 2, 3> compares 1 with something that requires min<2, 3>, which in turn instantiates min<3> to compare it with 2. Now min<3> tries to instantiate min<> to compare with 3, which obviously doesn't work. Use a partial specialization. template ...



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