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5

In your current implementation the templated overload is preferred as per ยง13.3.3.1.4 [over.ics.ref]/p1: When a parameter of reference type binds directly (8.5.3) to an argument expression, the implicit conversion sequence is the identity conversion, unless the argument expression has a type that is a derived class of the parameter type, in which case ...


1

Just go ahead and specialize it, out of class: template<> std::vector< cFoo< int > >& cBar::getFoos() { return m_intFoos; } Working example


1

So you want getFoos<int>() to return m_intFoos etc? I think the simplest way is to introduce an empty tag-dispatch type: template <typename T> struct empty { }; template< typename tBuiltInType > std::vector< cFoo< tBuiltInType > >& getFoos() { return getFoosImpl(empty<tBuiltInType>{} ); } And then provide the ...


1

There are different alternatives, depending on how other constrains in the problem one might be more appropriate than another. The first one is to forward the request to a static function in a template class, which allows for partial specializations: template <int N> struct Helper { template <typename T> static void talk(T& t) { // ...


3

The trick is to forward implementation to an helper template class, and partial specialize that class and/or use tag dispatching: namespace { template<typename T, int N, bool isBase = std::is_base_of<Base, T>::value> struct helper { // general case: void operator () (std::array<std::unique_ptr<T>, N>& ...


6

Option #1 Use tag-dispatching: template <typename T> struct tag {}; template <typename container> class A { private: container m_container; template <typename T, typename Alloc> void foo_spec(tag<std::vector<T, Alloc> >) { // vector specific implementation } template <typename K, ...


0

You can't specialize individual methods, but the whole class template: template<typename container> class A { ... ... template<typename T> class A<vector<T>> { If you want most methods to be common and only some methods different, you can inherit all of the specializations from a common base class. template<typename ...


2

Unfortunately, this partial specialization is invalid C++. You may see the form in your example in the wild because MSC supported it as an extension. Here's an approach which demonstrates how you can remove the dependence of the parent class: namespace Imp { template <typename S> class B {}; template <> class B<int> {}; } template ...



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