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59

I think you need to use template template syntax to pass a param whose type is a template dependant on another template like this: template<template<class> class H, class S> void f(const H<S> &value) { } Here, H is a type which is templated, but I wanted this function to deal with all specializations of H. NOTE: I've been ...


42

Here is a simple example taken from 'Modern C++ Design - Generic Programming and Design Patterns Applied' by Andrei Alexandrescu: He uses a classes with template template parameters in order to implement the policy pattern: // Library code template <template <class> class CreationPolicy> class WidgetManager : public CreationPolicy<Widget> ...


27

Actually, usecase for template template parameters is rather obvious. Once you learn that C++ stdlib has gaping hole of not defining stream output operators for standard container types, you would proceed to write something like: template<typename T> static inline std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& out, std::list<T> const& ...


17

That's exactly right. I would expect it to work. So I think that GCC is in error with rejecting that. FWIW: #include <utility> template <template <typename...> class TemplateClass, typename... Args> TemplateClass<Args...> make(Args&&... args) { return TemplateClass<Args...>(std::forward<Args>(args)...); } ...


10

Here's another practical example from my CUDA Convolutional neural network library. I have the following class template: template <class T> class Tensor which is actually implements n-dimensional matrices manipulation. There's also a child class template: template <class T> class TensorGPU : public Tensor<T> which implements the same ...


9

Try this: template <typename T> class B { A< ::B > x; // fully qualified name for B }; According to C++ Standard 14.6.1/2 you should use the normal name of the template (i.e., the name from the enclosing scope, not the injected-class-name).


8

The template parameter list for vector isn't just one element, it takes two: template < class T, class Allocator = allocator<T> > class vector so in order to accept vector, you need to have a template template parameter with two blanks: template <typename ObjA, typename ObjB, template <typename, typename> class Container> struct ...


7

In std::vector<int> the class template std::vector is passed the type int as a parameter. In std::get<42>(some_tuple), the function template std::get is passed the value 42 as a parameter. Perhaps unimaginatively the former kind of argument is called a type argument of a template (or template type argument) while the latter kind is a (template) ...


7

The current standard doesn't say so, but the intention is that y and z have the same type. There is an open Core Working Group issue for this: http://wg21.cmeerw.net/cwg/issue1286


6

It doesn't work like that. Test<int, char> is a full blown type, instead of a template. So you need type parameters template<class Type1, class Type2 > struct Test2 { Type1 t1obj; Type2 t2obj; //Line 17 Test2(const Type1& t1, const Type2& t2) //Line 20 : t1obj(t1), t2obj(t2) { ...


6

f is supposed to be a class - you have a function. See below: // Class acts like a function - also known as functor. template<typename T, int a, int b> class f { int operator()(T v) { return v*a-b; // just do something for example } }; template<typename T, int a, int b, template<typename,int,int> class func> class C { int f() ...


6

Working usage example: #include <tuple> template<typename... TArgs> struct TupleTypeHolder { using TupleType = std::tuple<TArgs*...>; }; template<typename... TArgs> static int getSomeValue() { return 42; } // primary template: template<class T1, class T2> struct TupleMaker; // partial specialization: ...


6

The correct way is to use template template parameter: C++11: template <template<typename...> class C, typename T0, typename T1> C<T1> convert_container(const C<T0>& container, T1 value) { C<T1> new_container; // Do some stuff... return new_container; } C++03 (with allocator rebind): template ...


5

This is probably a GCC quirk. I can get the following to work with a dev snapshot (I don't have a copy of 4.6 right now): template< template<typename...> class TemplateClass , typename... Args , typename Result = TemplateClass<Args...> // Also works with the arguably more correct // , typename Result = TemplateClass< ...


5

First, documentation. If the parameter is variadic, the user now needs to check some other source to find out that this really wants something that will takes one template parameter. Second, early checking. If you accidentally pass two arguments to T in S, the compiler won't tell you if it's variadic until a user actually tries to use it. Third, error ...


5

The problem with your code is that the containers that you want this to work for - (unordered_)(multi)map - have 4 or 5 template parameters, while your code only expects 2. Use template template parameters and variadic templates together to allow for the extra template parameters. template <typename Key, typename Value, template <typename, ...


5

This is a bug in gcc; it's fixed in gcc 4.9.0. From 5.3.3 [expr.sizeof ]: 5 - The identifier in a sizeof... expression shall name a parameter pack. [...]


4

I've no idea what you mean. Template template parameters seem the solution, although you somehow say they won't work. Why not do this? template <typename X, typename Y> class A { }; template <typename X, template<typename> class Y, typename P> class A< X, Y<P> > { /* property is P */ }; For your SFINAE question, yes that ...


4

But why is this necessary? What if your allocator class has more than one template argument? That's pretty much it in terms of why it is generally discouraged to use template template arguments, in favor of using normal template arguments, even if it means a bit of redundancy at the instantiation site. In many cases (however, probably not for ...


4

Your problem is that the T&& template magic only works for type parameters (it works by deducing T as eg. int& if needed - for lvalue arguments). It can't work for template template arguments, where the actual type is X<T>&& - X must be a class template in this case, not something like "reference-to-class-template". So in the end ...


4

Template arguments can never be deduced from nested types. Even if U and V can be deduced from the member function pointer, you won't be able to deduce the template type T. Explicitly specifying the template arguments as in the link to ideone (I didn't the the link before writing the statement above) doesn't work either, mainly because the template ...


4

Since T isn't a type, the question as asked doesn't make sense. However, you can make an alias for T, like: template <template <typename> class T, typename R> class Unit { template <typename U> using MyTemplate = T<U>; // ... // use e.g. MyTemplate<int> to get T<int> }; Pre-C++11 you would need something ...


4

You could declare struct update_tuple with two template parameters: T - will be templated, and this parameter we will apply to the parameters in the tuple std::tuple with a variable number of template parameters. Then just create an alias for a new tuple with arguments applied with T using pack expansion #include <tuple> #include ...


4

You can solve it through a little trickery: template<typename T, int a, int b> int f(T v){ return v*a-b; // just do something for example } template<typename T, int, int> using func_t = int (*)(T); template<typename T, int a, int b, func_t<T, a, b> func> class C{ int f(){ return func(3); } }; C<float,3,2, f<float, ...


4

The version of DoSomething that the compiler decides to use is the 4th one. Because std::vector<T, std::allocator<T>> is an exact match for the template parameter container and std::allocator<T> is an exact match for the template parameter deleter, and const container<T, deleter<T>>& is more specialized than const ...


4

Do you mean this? template <template <class> class A, class B> void f(A<B>) {}


4

The second parameter to GetRecById is a template, but you're trying to pass a type. You need: GetRecById< int, DummyLookup >( rec, nullptr ); // ^ Note, no template argument here


3

Old question, but here's an answer anyway. I just worked this one out now. Say you're using CRTP to provide an "interface" for a set of child templates; and both the parent and the child are parametric in other template argument(s): template <typename DERIVED, typename VALUE> class interface { void do_something(VALUE v) { ...


3

This is a known bug in the Visual C++ compiler. See the following bug on Microsoft Connect for more information (the repro is slightly different, but the issue is effectively the same): C++ compiler bug - cannot use template parameters inside nested template declaration The recommended workaround is to use an integer type for the template parameter of ...



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