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20

You can use the item vmethod: [% artist.item('life-span') %].


20

You need to first decide what you are trying to do. Are you trying to write a dynamic site, generating web pages whose content vary depending on requests or are you trying to make building a static web site easier? Either way, you should learn HTML on its own, and write some static web pages by hand. Then, realize that you can use Template::Toolkit's ttree ...


18

Sure. You can pass the result set directly to TT and iterate over it in the template. $c->stash->{cards} = $rs; ...and then: [% WHILE (card = cards.next) %] [% card.given_name %] [% card.family_name %] [% END %]


18

Your ARRAY_REF will be true because it is defined and it would be a true value in Perl. The usual approach is to check that it is true and non-empty: [% IF ARRAY_REF && ARRAY_REF.size %] Do something [% ELSE %] Do something else [% END %] Say what you really mean, asking the computer to pretend to be smarter than it is leads to odd ...


16

Granted, the documentation on Catalyst::View::HTML::Template is a little sparse and it's not a tutorial per se, but it does cover configuring the basic HTML::Template settings (die_on_bad_params, etc.) and states that "Template params are set up from the contents of $c->stash", which looks to me like it should be enough to get you started.


15

You are looking for: DEBUG_UNDEF This option causes the Template Toolkit to throw an 'undef' error whenever it encounters an undefined variable value. use Template::Constants qw( :debug ); my $template = Template->new({ DEBUG => DEBUG_UNDEF, }); (From http://search.cpan.org/dist/Template-Toolkit/lib/Template/Manual/Config.pod.) If you ...


15

I can only recommend Text::Xslate (website) here. It is better than TT in every way and beats out most of the competition as well. And lastly, it fits all your requirements. Literally. All of them. It is even proven in practice, as it is used by one of the Top 100 websites worldwide and one of the Top 10 websites in Japan: Livedoor Xslate in comparison to ...


14

I figured this one out after a long time. Apparently the ActiveState people didn't check much into the package because it requires Template::Stash::XS, but that's not actually available in PPM. To fix this issue just edit the Template/Config.pm and change Template::Stash::XS to Template::Stash.


13

The expression 'values' => @list expands to a list that contains "values" "one" "two" "three", so you should try with a reference to the array instead: template 'list.tt', { 'values' => [@list], }; The above still copies @list and returns a reference. If you want to fetch a reference to the already existing array use \@list.


11

It turns out that Googling for template::toolkit profiling yields the best result, an article from November 2005 by Randal Schwartz. I can't copy and paste any of the article here due to copyright, but suffice to say that you simply get his source and use it as a module after template, like so: use Template; use My::Template::Context; And you'll get ...


11

Use references to pass arrays or hashes into your template: $vars->{'Tree'} = \@dirs; Then in the template: [% FOR d = Tree %] [% d %] [% END %]


11

Template Toolkit uses a unified syntax for accessing elements of complex structures. This should do what you want: [% foo.bar.0.id %]


11

I am assuming you are passing the Moose object like this. $template->process('some.tt', $moose_object, ... ); The second paramater is assumed to be a hashref, not any kind of blessed object ( Moose or not ). So, the Moose object gets treated as a plain hash and does not have the 'colors' key until you populate it by calling the accessor outside ...


10

You can also pass functions (ie. subroutines) to template like this: use strict; use warnings; use List::Util (); use Template; my $tt = Template->new({ INCLUDE_PATH => '.', }); $tt->process( 'not_plugin.tt', { divider => sub { '=' x $_[0] }, capitalize => sub { ucfirst $_[0] }, sum => sub { ...


10

The documentation explains: process($template, \%vars, $output, %options) The process() method is called to process a template. The first parameter indicates the input template as one of: a filename relative to INCLUDE_PATH, if defined; a reference to a text string containing the template text; ... # text reference ...


10

Sorry, there isn't. Being able to instantiate anonymous arrays in situ is a special case handled by the TT parser. You can't operate on them like you can in regular Perl without the intermediate step of assigning to a named variable. EDIT: You can't even pass in a subroutine to try to use like so: [% FOREACH month IN my_reverse([1..12]) %] [% month %] ...


10

The following works for me: my $tt = Template->new; $tt->process( \"[% IF foo == bar %]blah[% END %]", { foo => 42, bar => 42 } ); That outputs 'blah'. So I suspect that your two variables don't contain what you think they do. Template Toolkit uses string equality for ==, so if you do: my $tt = Template->new; $tt->process( \"[% IF ...


9

There isn't any support for rand by default in Template, so you have to either import it via some other code (like Slash) or use Template::Plugin::Math, e.g.: [%- USE Math -%] [%- pages = [ 'one', 'two', 'three' ] -%] <p>Go to page [%- pages.${ Math.rand(pages.size) } -%]</p> Output: $ tpage test.html <p>Go to page three</p> ...


9

Template is returning an error object of type Template::Exception. The object has overloaded stringification which applies when the value is printed, but when die looks at the value, it sees a reference and doesn't append the line number and newline. Force the value into a string earlier to fix the problem: use Template; my $template = Template->new ...


9

I'm currently experimenting with Template::Alloy and it seems to be, by and large, a drop-in replacement for TT. Template::Alloy::TT lists the differences between TT and Alloy, most of which are of the form "This works/is allowed in Alloy, but not in TT." Addressing your specific issue, the list includes: Alloy has better line information ...


9

Try the CALL directive: [% CALL item.date.set_time_zone(c.user.timezone.name) %] From the documentation: The CALL directive is similar to GET in evaluating the variable named, but doesn't print the result returned. This can be useful when a variable is bound to a sub-routine or object method which you want to call but aren't interested in the value ...


8

Yes. If you pass the DEBUG option to Template->new, TT will warn you about undefined values. See the docs here: http://search.cpan.org/dist/Template-Toolkit/lib/Template/Manual/Variables.pod


8

I think .size is what you want. perl -MTemplate -le '$t = Template->new; $t->process(\"[% \"O HAI\" IF arrayref.size %]", { arrayref => [] })' perl -MTemplate -le '$t = Template->new; $t->process(\"[% \"O HAI\" IF arrayref.size %]", { arrayref => [1] })' O HAI I'd also offer that an empty array ref is true in plain Perl– perl -le '$abc ...


8

Template Toolkit reads source files for templates in binary mode, but writing in text mode. Data from template (that contains CR LF) are translated during output in text mode, so the LF becomes CR LF. The easiest solution for the problem is to write files in binary mode (note the raw modifier to open call): my $tt = Template->new; my $output_file = ...


8

http://template-toolkit.org/docs/manual/Syntax.html#section_Capturing_Block_Output Note one important caveat of using this syntax in conjunction with side-effect notation. The following directive does not behave as might be expected: [% var = 'value' IF some_condition %] # does not work In this case, the directive is interpreted as (spacing added for ...


8

Data::Printer to the rescue! It's object dump is more human-readable: my $obj = SomeClass->new; p($obj); # produces: \ SomeClass { Parents Moose::Object Linear @ISA SomeClass, Moose::Object public methods (3) : bar, foo, meta private methods (0) internals: { _something => 42, } } It is compatible with Template ...


7

I think its the EXPOSE_BLOCKS option that you maybe after? use strict; use warnings; use Template; my $tt = Template->new({ INCLUDE_PATH => '.', EXPOSE_BLOCKS => 1, }); $tt->process( 'test.tt/header', { tit => 'Weekly report' } ); for my $day qw(Mon Tues Weds Thurs Fri Sat Sun) { $tt->process( 'test.tt/body', { day => ...


7

Put this before the call to $tt->process() to have the output automatically encoded: binmode STDOUT, ':utf8'; Edit: As daxim mentioned, it's possible to utilize TT's encoding facilities: $tt->process($infile, $vars, '-', { binmode => ':utf8' }) This relies on the widely used convention that the '-' filename gives you STDIN when it's opened ...


6

Are you looking to make your own templates, or use ones that were already developed by someone else? You can make your own components just fine with Template Toolkit, and you can easily insert other widgets you find into Template files. I don't know of any ready-made packages that you can just download for common things that show up on web pages. It would ...


6

Found this on the TT mailing list: http://lists.template-toolkit.org/pipermail/templates/2009-December/011061.html seems like TT's ".list" has trouble converting objects to lists in general, not just RDBOs. The suggestion is make a vmethod: $Template::Stash::LIST_OPS->{ as_list } = sub { return ref( $_[0] ) eq 'ARRAY' ? shift : [shift]; }; I ...



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