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26

It is not slicing at all, rather it is undefined behavior because you are accessing a Derived object where none exists (unless you get lucky and the sizes line up, in which case it is still UB but might do something useful anyway). It's a simple case of failed pointer arithmetic.


19

This is not object slicing. As noted, indexing myArray does not cause object slicing, but results in undefined behavior caused by indexing into an array of Derived as if it were an array of Base. A kind of "array decay bug". The bug introduced at the assignment of new Derived[42] to myArray may be a variation of an array decay bug. In a true instance of ...


16

* is just a multiplication - as + for lists is an intuitive thing, meaning concatenate both operands, the next step is multiplication by a scalar - with [0] * N meaning "concatenate this list with itself N times"! In other words: * is an operator defined in Python for its primitive sequence types and an integer to concatenate the sequence with itself that ...


12

From the Python docs' description, the multiplication operator * used between an integer n and a primitive sequence type performs sequence repetition of the items in the sequence n times. So I suppose the term you are looking for is sequence repetition. Note that this is not "sequence copying", as no copies of the items are created - you have n references ...


11

This is not object slicing in any way. Object slicing is perfectly well defined by the C++ standard. It may be a violation of object-oriented design principles or whatever, but it is not a violation of C++ rules. This code violates 5.7 [expr.add] paragraph 7: For addition or subtraction, if the expressions P or Q have type “pointer to cv T”, where T is ...


8

This is not a case of slicing, although it is very similar. Slicing is well defined. This is simply undefined behaviour (always, not just likely) due to illegal pointer arithmetic.


5

Let's get some terminology straight: function declaration: also called the function prototype. It is the function signature and name, without the function body. Instead, it is followed by a semicolon. function definition: the function declaration (without semicolon) followed by a brace-enclosed block of code, called the function body. function signature: ...


4

From cppreference: C allows more than one declaration for the same identifier to be in scope simultaneously if these identifiers belong to different categories, called name spaces: Label name space: all identifiers declared as labels. Tag names: all identifiers declared as names of structs, unions and enumerated types. Note that all three kinds ...


4

This is the most simple explanation about Dependency Injection and Dependency Injection Container I have ever seen: Without Dependency Injection Application needs Foo (e.g. a controller), so: Application creates Foo Application calls Foo Foo needs Bar (e.g. a service), so: Foo creates Bar Foo calls Bar Bar needs Bim (a service, a repository, …), so: ...


2

Yes, "hooking" means having your code run when that interrupt fires, but then jumping to handler you replaced when your function is done. So instead of taking over the interrupt completely, you've added your function to the head of a chain of handlers. Imagine the IDT as a global array of function pointers. In C, it would be like: extern void ...


2

When interrupts are fired in real mode, the CPU transfers execution to the handler for that interrupt, which is specified in the Interrupt Vector Table. To hook an interrupt in this context means to change the address at entry 19h in the Interrupt Vector Table to point to another address of their choice. Then, when interrupt 19h is fired, it would execute ...


1

This might not answer your question directly, but it might give you a sense of the difference between type and class. class Card: def __init__(self, suit=0, rank=0): self.suit = suit self.rank = rank card1 = Card() Card is a class object, so its type is type. However, card1 is an instance of Card, so its type is Card.


1

There's a lot of confusion and misuse of these terms. Often one is used to mean another. Here is what those terms actually mean. "Native" refers to types that are built into to the language, as opposed to being provided by a library (even a standard library), regardless of how they're implemented. Perl strings are part of the Perl language, so they are ...


1

Web service is absolutely the same as Web API - just a bit more restricted in terms of underlying data format. Both use HTTP protocol and both allows to create RESTful services. And don't forget for other protocols like JSON-RPC - maybe they fit better.


1

Exceptions are often used to manage errors, they make error handling easier but they aren't always errors. Every unordinary situation that require a separate code path could be a candidate for an exception. Although the use of exceptions for control flow can be confusing (it depends largely on the language), they can be used to break out of a loop. ...


1

Iteratee is not a function that just does some work. It has to do some work on an iterable set, an array for example. A predicate is a function that takes an argument and returns true/false, predicates are for example used for filtering iterable sets. Thus, iteratee and predicate are definitely not the same. Function factory is not just a function that does ...


1

Does this terminology carry over into C++? No. "Tag names" are not mentioned in the C++ standard except for in the informative annex C++ and ISO C where tag names are discussed in the context of C.


1

The function has a touch of the Feature Envy code smell. ("Code smells" are antipatterns, documented in a chapter by Fowler and Beck in the Refactoring book, named before the word "antipattern" was in wide use.) Feature Envy is when one module is coupled to another module by calling too many of the other module's methods. In this case one is too many. The ...


1

I don't think there is a name for the anti-pattern, but the rule that this is in violation of is called the Law of Demeter. LoD can be regarded as the principle of assuming "least structural knowledge" (something its creator calls "Structure-shy programming"). The idea is to assume knowledge of no object's internal structure other than your own immediate ...


1

Looking at the current browser Netflix User Interface (May of 2016 version), I would consider this a rich user interface due to several characteristics. It is a pretty good front end to an elaborate database of information about movies and television shows. The UI allows a user to select a particular resource, movie or television show, and to then see ...


1

Yes, we stopped using the term "LWRP" because we felt it was overly confusing and didn't emphasize that resources as the same, no matter if they come from Chef core or a cookbook. There are two major "styles" for writing custom resources, one is the LWRP-DSL style in the resources/ and providers/ cookbook directories, and the other is the plain-old-Ruby ...



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