Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

11

To answer your first question (and by consequence the others), from the terms of service this would not appear to be legal: 4.4. You may not develop multiple Applications to simulate or act as a single Application or otherwise access the Service in a manner intended to avoid incurring fees.


10

This is what a Log.d("DEBUG", GooglePlayServicesUtil.getOpenSourceSoftwareLicenseInfo(this)); reveals (Feb 2013 - this may have changed meanwhile! See the first comment): This product includes software from the The Android Open Source Project Copyright (c) 2005-2008, The Android Open Source Project Licensed under the Apache License, Version 2.0 ...


8

According to Google's TOS, you are correct in assuming that you do not have the right to do this. Can you get away with doing it anyway? Probably so. Should you? Probably not. If it's just a personal project with low traffic, go for it.


5

If you have trouble using the SMS verification, you can contact them by using the SMS issues form and state your case. However, they clearly say that You may only sign up for one Google App Engine account per mobile phone number. You can still create the applications with your "fake" account and invite your real account as a developer/admin, I think. ...


5

If you don't want to go down the route of copying someone elses then you really need to hire the services of a lawyer who will compose some for you. Let's be honest though, everyone else just copies someone elses - which is fine because nobody reads them.


5

Good question. I believe that the "logical separation" you talk about in your question is an illusion. Separation of concerns results from proper software engineering, not from introducing contrived modularity by creating more App Engine projects. I don't doubt your noble intentions (that is, you are not trying to fool the TOS) but I do question the ...


5

for the privacy policy you may try iubenda for facebook apps (http://www.iubenda.com/en/facebook). It allows you to generate a privacy policy that you can then customize. Very quick and easy. I'm the founder, so if you have questions don't hesitate to ask :)


5

iOS apps have nothing to do with GAE apps. You can have hundreds of iOS app talking to one GAE app. AFAIK this in no way violates GAE TOS.


4

I think the reason should be obvious. Such apps potentially take responsibility for human lives, with all the usual consequences. Apple doesn't want to mess with or become associated with possible damages. I believe such highly specialized ("professional") apps should be distributed in a more restricted way than App Store can provide. They most likely ...


4

You can do that. Just make sure that you provide sample login data when you pass the app to the apple review team (enter the username/password in the "review notes" when submitting the app). Apple and Google won't reject because of the login.


4

You don't need to serve your static content from a different app, you just need to use a different hostname. App Engine makes it pretty easy to have many different hostnames that point to the same app. With wildcard subdomains you don't even have to create a DNS entry. If your app lives at myapp.appspot.com, you can also reach it through any subdomain, like ...


4

The terms of use are not crystal clear on this issue, but I've always read them to indicate that you can store the geocodes in your database as long as you are only using them so that they can be shown in conjunction with a Google Map. Section 10.3 you may store limited amounts of Content for the purpose of improving the performance of your Maps API ...


4

Did some more research .. there is no easy solution to your problem. If your site uses AJAX for a majority of the content then you can look at implementing the Google Ajax-Crawling (aka Hash-Bang) specs. This will ensure that that the Google bot and Adsense bot crawl your AJAX content. This will help with both relevant ads and search results. ...


3

In all my apps, I didn't show anything about terms. It causes user to be afraid, and delete the app. Try to open application without signing up, and than offer signing when it is necessary. The main idea is - "Don't force user to signup or accept terms". If terms are necessary , make it more user friendly, don't force user on the start of application to ...


3

You can publish 2 different versions of your app, with one being an Ad-Free version. You really should consider in app purchases to enable this, as you likely will have much more success. In direct answer to your question - as long as your 2 apps are significantly different (one without ads would be different enough IMHO) it is not against the Play Store ...


3

It's (mostly) because of a European Union directive. Explanation here. That site will, of course, ask you to agree to its use of cookies!


3

I was wondering if there are legal issues for developing such a product, in regards to violating "terms of use" of such websites. The legal issue would be violating the terms of use. I assume some of the info is public and not copyrighted, i.e. title, authors names and publisher. What about cover images, description, and reviews? ...


3

There are a number of restrictions on SQL Server Express that might not make it suitable for certain projects, but as far as I'm aware there is nothing in the license disallowing it. See http://www.microsoft.com/Sqlserver/2005/en/us/compare-features.aspx for a detailed feature comparison, but essentially this boils down to: It will only use a single CPU ...


3

First off, StackOverflow answers do not consitute good legal advice. :) My lay opinion of the law is that using images of the phone would be legal, provided that you own the copyright to the images or have permission from the copyright holder to use them in this way. Consider almost any advertisement for a website, they show the smiling user in a ...


3

The ToS you quote says you aren't allowed to do anything other than resize the logo. However, I don't know how strictly Facebook enforces this. A terms of service violation isn't illegal (unless your action breaks a law), in the sense that you can't go to jail for it. In extreme cases, a ToS violation can provoke a lawsuit. I have no idea if Facebook ...


3

Anything that you’ve created is your intellectual property and that is governed by traditional property laws. Many sites require that you accept a terms of service document that essentially grants them ownership of your content. So, from a legal stand-point, you would get your users to accept a TOS, if you use/store any of their intellectual property. ...


3

Usually you have to agree to the MSDNAA terms and conditions when you either sign up for it or download the software. At least all universities where I've seen it so far do it this way. Whether you read it is another matter, then, though :) However, you are allowed to use the products for non-commercial use even after your affiliation with the university ...


3

If I understand correctly you want them to accept the confirmation, and have it set a cookie. Then the next time they show up not dislay the legal thing. First, get this jQuery plugin: https://github.com/carhartl/jquery-cookie It allows you to do things like: $.cookie("test", 1); So you would modify your code like so: function ...


3

There are so many restrictions and conditions in that license that you need a radiation hazard suit to go anywhere near it. Spotify want others to do free work: develop free-as-in-beer applications on their platform, which only interact with the platform in ways that they approve of.


2

From Apple's App Store Review Guidelines, as of March 2012: 2.22. Apps that arbitrarily restrict which users may use the app, such as by location or carrier, may be rejected 11.1 Apps that unlock or enable additional features or functionality with mechanisms other than the App Store will be rejected 11.2 Apps utilizing a system other than the ...


2

Is it legal to use MKMapKit to record the users location You'll use CoreLocation, not MapKit, to get the user's location, and you can certainly store that data. MapKit should only be needed to display the locations that you've collected.


2

Paragraph 9.1.1(a) mandates that not only must you allow unrestricted access to the Map, but also to Your Content and any other content in your implementation. 8.1(d) defines "Your Content" as "any content that you provide in your Maps API Implementation, including data, images, video, or software." So, you must show your data to everyone who sees the map. ...


2

My approach with forms is to try and use the rails standards where possible, e.g. Add to your User model: validates_acceptance_of :terms attr_accessible :terms In your view, <%= form_for @user do |f| %> ... <%= f.check_box :terms %> ... <% end %> You actually don't need an extra column in the users table unless you want to ...


2

I think it is against FB Terms. PLease note the following two points in the 'Promotions' section of the terms: iv. You must not use Facebook features or functionality as a promotion’s registration or entry mechanism. For example, the act of liking a Page or checking in to a Place cannot automatically register or enter a promotion participant. v. You ...


2

I have setup my own location database that also allows for reverse geocoding using GPS coordinates. If you are comfortable hosting your own solution, I recommend using MongoDB for its awesome geospatial index together with the free to download Geonames database. here is what I did and what you can do as well: Setup a webserver. Mine runs on Amazon EC2 and ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible