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60

First, testing is like security -- you can never be 100% sure you've got it, but each layer adds more confidence and a framework for more easily fixing the problems that remain. Second, you can break tests into subroutines which themselves can then be tested. When you have 20 similar tests, making a (tested) subroutine means your main test is 20 simple ...


37

A test being wrong is unlikely to break your production code. At least, not any worse than having no test at all. So it's not a "point of failure": the tests don't have to be correct in order for the product to actually work. They might have to be correct before it's signed off as working, but the process of fixing any broken tests does not endanger your ...


22

All I see is more possible points of failure, with no real beneficial return, if the discount price is wrong, the test team will still find the issue, how did unit testing save any work? Unit testing isn't really supposed to save work, it's supposed to help you find and prevent bugs. It's more work, but it's the right kind of work. It's ...


20

There's a difference in terms of what the driving factor is. Do you have a vague idea of what the class (or system - this can happen at different scales, of course) should look like, then think up tests which give it the actual shape? That's TDD. Do you know exactly what the public API of the class should be, and just write the tests before the ...


12

They are basically different names describing the same thing - well, in fact five names, as the last D can stand for Design as well as for Development. Test First was the term used originally, especially in the context of Extreme Programming, for the test-code-refactor cycle. The name Test Driven Development has been proposed - and quickly adopted - later, ...


10

Unit tests are there so that your units (methods) do what you expect. Writing the test first forces you to think about what you expect before you write the code. Thinking before doing is always a good idea. Unit tests should reflect the business rules. Granted, there can be errors in the code, but writing the test first allows you to write it from the ...


9

How does one test a test? Mutation testing is a valuable technique that I have personally used to surprisingly good effect. Read the linked article for more details, and links to even more academic references, but in general it "tests your tests" by modifying your source code (changing "x += 1" to "x -= 1" for example) and then rerunning your tests, ...


8

When applying Test-Driven Development (TDD), one begins with a failing test. This step, that might seem unecessary, actually is here to verify the unit test is testing something. Indeed, if the test never fails, it brings no value and worse, leads to wrong confidence as you'll rely on a positive result that is not proving anything. When following this ...


7

While, I am all for unit testing, I sometimes wonder if this form of test first development is really beneficial... Small, trivial tests like this can be the "canary in the coalmine" for your codebase, alerting of danger before it's too late. The trivial tests are useful to keep around because they help you get the interactions right. For ...


6

Unit testing works very similar to double entry book keeping. You state the same thing (business rule) in two quite different ways (as programmed rules in your production code, and as simple, representative examples in your tests). It's very unlikely that you make the same mistake in both, so if they both agree with each other, it's rather unlikely that you ...


6

If you have little experience in writing tests, it's the easiest to start from the domain model (or a higher level just below the UI). When you have driven the design of the domain model with TDD, then you will know that what the database schema needs to be like. It may be good to postpone introducing a database to the system, because dealing with database ...


5

You won't believe this, but here's what Kent Beck had to say, right here on StackOverflow: "I get paid for code that works, not for tests, so my philosophy is to test as little as possible to reach a given level of confidence (I suspect this level of confidence is high compared to industry standards, but that could just be hubris). If I don't typically ...


4

You could write a test that pushes a ninth item onto the stack. That would clearly fail if you don't have any resizing logic. However, hard-coding the 9 into the test seems like a bad idea, since you would be incorporating internal implementation details of the Stack into the tests. Now, the writing of TDD tests often informs the author of possible gaps in ...


4

The key aspect of test-driven development is that you do not implement functionality that is not required to pass a test. Test-first simply means writing the test before you implement the functionality. This is mostly done to ensure that the test will actually fail if the functionality is not present. Test-driven development implies a test-first approach, ...


4

Most unit tests, test assumptions. In this case, the discount price should be the price minus the discount. If your assumptions are wrong I bet your code is also wrong. And if you make a silly mistake, the test will fail and you will correct it. If the rules change, the test will fail and that is a good thing. So you have to change the test too in this ...


3

Test everything you can. Even trivial mistakes, like forgetting to convert meters to feet can have very expensive side effects. Write a test, write the code for it to check, get it to pass, move on. Who knows at some point in the future, someone may change the discount code. A test can detect the problem.


3

It seems that your main issue here is knowing when to write mock code. I see your point: if you haven't written the code yet, how can you mock it? I think the answer is that you want to start your TDD with very, very simple tests, as Kent Beck does in Test Driven Development. Start by writing a test that calls DoSearch and asserts that what you receive ...


3

Good point with writing the test afterwards! If you first implement the functions and then test them it feels odd. Thats why you should first write the tests and then implement the functions. Moreover this will force you to think about how you want to use your functions. In addition if you first implement whatever you want to implement, you'll find yourself ...


3

Yes I would write a test for that method as well, in general you should have test for feature you implement. Remember TDD is not just for testing if the method works, you should also test how it handles exceptions, for instance what were to happen if it got a Null as the user object. When developing using TDD, you are really designing the API other members ...


3

Your stopwatch class probably gets the date and time from somewhere. Make an object which returns the current date. This would be a very simple class. When testing, pass in a mock object instead, which returns a fake date and time. This way, you can pretend in your test as if many seconds have elapsed. class DateTime { public Date getDate() { ...


3

In my view (I'm not sure I am correct), my tests should the possible interactions of my SUT with the exterior, and not on how it is implemented internally. Am I right? You are correct. If you change the internal implementation of your class, the unit tests should remain the same. If you expose anything new externally, you should create new unit ...


2

Ask yourself to what you are willing to commit for this class. Do you or the class' consumers really care whether the capacity doubles, increments by one, or increments by one thousand? If so, you should modify the interface so that they can specify the strategy used to increase capacity: public Stack<T>(CapacityGrowthStyle capacityGrowthStyle) { ... ...


2

Why would "artifially modifing a StopWatches' results"?! What's the whole purpose of testing if your going to modify your results? As for testing you should also test the stop method and you should test if the amount of seconds is roughly 60 times more than the amount of minutes. The class you are writing could also use StopWatch internally and then modify ...


2

I am not sure how you can the test the internal list or array size through a unit test. You can't access it through the Stack interface. Unit testing is for testing external contracts. If you want to test implementation details then try something else. The answer to your 2nd question is yes, the test should still pass, if it's a unit test.


2

I see your point, but it's clearly overstated. Your argument is basically: Tests introduce failure. Therefore tests are bad/waste of time. While that may be true in some cases, it's hardly the majority. TDD assumes: More Tests = Less Failure. Tests are more likely to catch points of failure than introduce them.


2

Start with a mock/prototype (e.g. Balsamiq Mocks) of the application, then writre the views, mocking controllers as you go along, then write the controller logic, mocking the DAO/Repositorys along the way. By the time you start writing your DAO/Repositories, you'll have a good idea of your your required domain objects. Knock those out and use Fluent ...


2

You'll want to write a mock when you're testing code that uses the search, not for testing the search itself. For the class above, I might test by: searching for a common book and checking that is was found and is valid. searching for a random fixed string "kjfdskajfkldsajklfjafa" and making sure no books were found etc But.. and here's the big one, I'd ...


2

Team System is probably the best-known solution, but you could also try TSQLUnit (SourceForge). I haven't used it myself, but this article does a decent job of introducing it.


2

Remember that the cost of fixing defects increases (exponentially) as the defects live through the development cycle. Yes, the testing team might catch the defect, but it will (usually) take more work to isolate and fix the defect from that point than if a unit test had failed, and it will be easier to introduce other defects while fixing it if you don't ...


2

???? Did I do it as a class method? Yes Was there another/ better way than creating a new object? Not really, this looks like the intended result of the lesson. The temperature object's constructor should accept an options hash which contains either a :celcius entry or a :fahrenheit entry. ???? I know I used a hash, but did I use an ...



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