Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

108

In addition to the points from prior answers, it's worth clarifying the differences between these two products from the perspective of choices made in their development. Sublime is binary compiled for the platform. Its core is written in C/C++ and a number of its features are implemented in Python, which is also the language used for extending it. Atom is ...


99

Atom is written using Node.js, CoffeeScript and LESS. It's then wrapped in a WebKit wrapper, which was originally only available for OSX, although there is now also a Windows version available. (Linux version has to be built from source, but there is a PPA for Ubuntu users.) A lot of the architecture and features have been duplicated from Sublime Text ...


41

Atom is open source (has been for a few hours by now), whereas Sublime Text is not.


21

How is Atom different from Sublime? Atom is an open source text editor/IDE, built on JavaScript/HTML/CSS. Sublime Text is a commercial product, built on C/C++. Comparable to Atom is Adobe Brackets, another open source text editor/IDE built on JavaScript/HTML/CSS. Be minded that this makes Brackets more oriented towards Web development, specially in the ...


20

... And, if you want to avoid entering in the command mod when pressing ESC key, add the following ignored packages in your sublime preferences: "ignored_packages": [ "Vintage" ]


13

Another useful shortcut: "ctrl + k, ctrl + b" will show/hide the sidebar


9

Since Idea IntelliJ IDEA 13.1 there is possibility to edit multiple lines. Use: Alt+Shift+Mouse click for selection. More about this new improvement in IntelliJ blogpost here. Very useful feature.


8

To disagree with the official answer: :set list will not show ^M characters (CRs). Supplying the -b option to vi/vim will work. Or, once vim is loaded, type :e ++ff=unix.


7

I just got my beta invitation today and tried Atom right away. The GUI feels like Sublime, and yes, there some shortcuts adopted from Sublime. Besides everything mentioned above, here are some differences I have noticed so far: Vim mode is not as good as the Vintage mode on Sublime (which is not a fully featured vim either) because the vim package is in ...


7

Another difference is that Sublime text is a closed source project, while Atom source code is/will be publicly available --although Github does not plan to release it as a real open source project. They want to give access to the code, without opening it to contributions. Github made the code public: ...


7

If all you need is a tool for reading, then this thing will open the file instantly http://www.readfileonline.com/


7

For those who arrived on this question using Visual Studio 2013 (or above, I'd imagine) the feature is built right into the program. Just use AltUp and AltDown to move the line with your cursor—or the selected lines—up and down.


7

In Emacs 24.4, C-x SPC is bound to rectangle-mark-mode which selects a rectangle visually. http://emacsredux.com/blog/2014/01/01/a-peek-at-emacs-24-dot-4-rectangular-selection/ describes this in greater detail.


6

You use rectangle commands by placing the mark at one corner of the rectangle and point at the opposite corner. Even though the region will be displayed as normal, the rectangle commands will act on the rectangle delimited by point and mark. CUA mode doesn't affect this. You just have to use your imagination :)


6

Choose editor -> code folding -> focus


5

Here are some differences between the two: Atom is open source (MIT License) A single user license for Sublime Text costs $70. Atom is written in Node.js, CoffeeScript, HTML and LESS. Sublime Text is written in C++, Python for plugins, and Objective-C for Cocoa integration Atom has a built-in package manager* Sublime Text depends on a third-party ...


5

Basic tools: A compiler: The JDK comes with a command-line compiler, javac. If it's not in your PATH, you can find it in the bin subdirectory of wherever you installed the JDK. (I typically add that directory to my PATH.) (If you didn't install the JDK yourself, it was installed by your IDE; you may want to do a "normal" installation yourself.) A way to ...


5

Though you need to escape certain characters to prevent them from being interpreted as regular expression atoms (which can be reduced by prepending the \V "very nomagic" atom; then, only backslashes need to be escaped), whitespace does not need escaping. Therefore, it should be possible to search (starting from normal mode) simply via /Stack Overflow, and ...


5

A TMemo is a wrapper for a native multi line edit control and is subject to the limitations it has. From INFO: Size Limits for a Multiline Edit Control: A multiline edit control is also subject to the following limitations: The maximum number of characters in a single line is 1024. The maximum width of a line is 30,000 pixels. The maximum ...


5

Summary Ctrl + 0 will navigate to your sidebar. By default you can navigate the folders with your arrow keys. If you prefer 'Vim' type settings, you can avoid using the arrow keys by remapping your keys to the typical Vim settings (hjkl). h will minimize/open a folder j will navigate down (i.e. down arrow) k will navigate up (i.e. up arrow) l will open ...


5

The package expand-region is convenient for this. Calling er/expand-region with the point inside the quotes will mark the nearest word, and then calling it again will mark all the words inside the quotes. (Calling it a third time will expand the region to include the quotes.) I have it bound to C-;. (global-set-key (kbd "C-;") 'er/expand-region) With ...


5

In Vim, I think the easiest way would be to yank the indenting whitespace and search for it. You could map a key to this. Something like: :nnoremap <F3> 0y^/^<C-R>0\s\@!<CR> 0y^ jumps to the beginning of the line and yanks to the first text on the line /^ starts a search beginning at the start of a line <C-R>0 places the yanked ...


4

I had a similar problem and found it wasn't documented super well. There are a few bug threads where some solutions are mentioned: https://github.com/fraywing/textAngular/issues/54 and https://github.com/fraywing/textAngular/issues/146 Following another user's solution there, and the customizing the toolbar section on the wiki, my solution looked like ...


4

Those are some good out-of-the box solutions given above, but we can also try some plugins which provide multiple cursors like Sublime. I think this one looks promising: https://github.com/terryma/vim-multiple-cursors It seemed abandoned for a while, but has had some contributions in 2014. It is quite powerful, although it took me a little while to get ...


4

Atom has been created by Github and it includes "git awareness". That is a feature I like quite a lot: Also it highlights the files in the git tree that have changed with different colours depending on their commit status:


4

In Emacs, whether a command affects a continuous piece of text or a rectangle depends on the command, not on what the selection looks like. I'm not aware of any way to make the selection appear as a rectangle on the screen (but see this answer), but if you use any of the rectangle commands listed in the page you linked to, such as C-x r k or C-x r t, you'll ...


4

The official documentation for installing packages is here: You can also install packages from the command line using apm. Check that you have apm installed by running the following command in your terminal: apm help install You should see a message print out with details about the apm install command. If you do not, launch Atom and run the ...


4

This really doesn't have anything to do with go specifically, you start the process, wait for it to exit and then do your thing: cmd := exec.Command("vim", "file.txt") if cmd.Run() != nil { //vim didn't exit with status code 0 } else { //it worked, do stuff with file.txt }


4

tchar.h is a Microsoft-specific header file, so you're at least seeing an error like the one below when you try to compile with g++ foo.cpp:1:19: error: tchar.h No such file or directory You're likely seeing a whole host of other errors related to the fact that all of your code which uses stuff defined in tchar.h is using undefined data types.


4

curses is exactly what you want. In fact I believe vim implements its interface with curses. Try to put the following code into a file called test_curses.py: import curses screen = curses.initscr() screen.addstr("Hello World!!!") screen.refresh() screen.getch() curses.endwin() Now open a terminal (not IDLE! a real terminal!) and run it via: python ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible