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86

string[] result = input.Split(new string[] {"\n", "\r\n"}, StringSplitOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries); This covers both \n and \r\n newline types and removes any empty lines your users may enter. I tested using the following code: string test = "PersonA\nPersonB\r\nPersonC\n"; string[] result = test.Split(new string[] {"\n", "\r\n"}, ...


22

This should do the trick: sed -e '/=sec1=/,/=sec2=/ { /=sec1=/b; /=sec2=/b; s/^/#/ }' < input This matches between sec1 and sec2 inclusively and then just skips the first and last line with the b command. This leaves the desired lines between sec1 and sec2 (exclusive), and the s command adds the comment sign. Unfortunately, you do need to repeat the ...


18

You could select the region then C-u C-x <tab> will shift 4 spaces. You can type a number after C-u to change 4 to anything else.


14

Here you'll find many ways of obfuscating emails, and their effectiveness. Hope it helps!


11

You can use csplit: echo "a b c d e f" | csplit -s - '/^$/' Or csplit -s filename '/^$/' (assuming the contents of "filename" are the same as the output of the echo) would create, in this case, two files named "xx00" and "xx01". The prefix can be changed from "xx" to "outfile", for example, with -f outfile and the number of digits in the filename ...


10

$ cat test.txt a b c d e f $ sed '/^$/q' test.txt a b c $ sed '1,/^$/d' test.txt d e f Change the /^$/ to /^\s*$/ if you expect there may be whitespace on the blank line.


10

EDIT What you are looking for is textwrap, but that's only part of the solution not the complete one. To take newline into account you need to do this: from textwrap import wrap '\n'.join(['\n'.join(wrap(block, width=50)) for block in text.splitlines()]) >>> print '\n'.join(['\n'.join(wrap(block, width=50)) for block in text.splitlines()]) ...


10

You can use a regex for this. If you need a better Regex you can search for it here http://regexlib.com/Search.aspx?k=url My quick solution for this would be this: string mystring = "My text and url http://www.google.com The end."; Regex urlRx = new Regex(@"(?<url>(http:[/][/]|www.)([a-z]|[A-Z]|[0-9]|[/.]|[~])*)", RegexOptions.IgnoreCase); ...


9

You can try this : tail -c 104857600 yourFile or if you're more confortable: tail -c $[1024*1024*100] yourFile Resources : linux.die.net - tail


8

You can use the TStringList Class to split a text file. see this example : program SplitTextFile; {$APPTYPE CONSOLE} uses Classes, SysUtils; var Lines : TStringList; Split : TStringList; i : Integer; j : Integer; begin Lines := TStringList.Create; try Lines.LoadFromFile('c:\software\demo.txt'); //assign the file name Split ...


8

Depending on how "smart" and "sophisticated" you want this to be, this can be either very hard or very easy problem. Here's a simple regex solution that is quite dumb: String[] sentences = { "It's surprising", "It's cold", "It's $*($&%!", "That is a hot coffee indeed..." }; for (String sentence : sentences) { ...


8

If you're not interested in lines outside of the range, but just want the non-inclusive variant of the Iowa/Montana example from the question (which is what brought me here), you can write the "except for the first and last matching lines" clause easily enough with a second sed: sed -n '/PATTERN1/,/PATTERN2/p' < input | sed '1d;$d' Personally, I find ...


8

yourString.replaceAll("\n ", " "); this wont help?


8

Have you tried using a longest common subsequence algorithm? These are commonly seen in the "diff" text comparison tools used in source control apps and some text editors. A diff algorithm helps identify changed and unchanged characters in two text samples. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diff Some years ago I worked on an OCR app similar to yours. Rather than ...


8

Use an XML parser like lxml, regex is not suitable for this task. Example: import lxml.etree // First we parse the xml doc = lxml.etree.fromstring('<p o ="2"> And This is a number 12.90! </p>') // Then we use xpath to extract the element we need doc.xpath('/p/text()') You can read more about XPATH at: Xpath tutorial.


8

You can do this by applying a regular expression to a set of lines: sed -e '/myprocess/,+4 s/^/#/' This matches lines with 'myprocess' and the 4 lines after them. For those 4 lines it then inserts a '#' at the beginning of the line. (I think this might be a GNU extension - it's not in any of the "sed one liner" cheatsheets I know)


6

Read the file line by line, split each line on the tab car, and then put it into the DB using suitable SQL for your DB platform. Which part are you having trouble with?


5

Just released ReSharper 5.0 have project-level refactorings. Right click on the file, Refactor -> Move types into matching files


5

Maybe this works the way you want. (defun shift-text (distance) (if (use-region-p) (let ((mark (mark))) (save-excursion (indent-rigidly (region-beginning) (region-end) distance) (push-mark mark t t) (setq deactivate-mark nil))) (indent-rigidly ...


5

If you can't change your column types permanently, you can cast them on the fly: ALTER PROC [dbo].[SearchAndReplace] (@FindString VARCHAR(100), @ReplaceString VARCHAR(100) ) AS BEGIN UPDATE dbo.HTML_CONTENTS SET CONTENT_TEXT = cast (REPLACE(cast (CONTEXT_TEXT as varchar(max)), @FindString, @ReplaceString) as TEXT) END


5

Your problem seems to be more related to programming language parsing. I believe with regular expressions you will be able to find comments in most of the languages. The good thing is that you have regular expressions almost everywhere: Perl, Python, Ruby, AWK, Sed, etc. But, as the other answer said, you'd better use some parsing machinery. And, if not ...


5

for line in text_file: print ' '.join(word.title() if len(word) > 3 else word for word in line.split()) Edit: To omit counting punctuation replace len with the following function: def letterlen(s): return sum(c.isalpha() for c in s)


5

Try this simple command: :g/^/pu_ g/^/ will match every line, then exec command below. pu _ will put the text from register _(the black hole register) after current matched line. You can also use the :substitute command: :%s/$/\r Yet another one which uses external sed: :%!sed G All commands have the same length. Pick one you like.


4

You probably want to use the textwrap function in the standard library: http://docs.python.org/library/textwrap.html


4

Given the awk script BEGIN { fout="headers" } /^$/ { fout="body" } { print $0 > fout } awk -f foo.awk < httpfile will write out the two files headers and body for you.


4

One of the ways to split a string on a delimiter is using a TStringlist: var list : TStringList; begin list := TStringList.Create; try list.Delimiter := #32; list.DelimitedText := 'abc def ghi'; first := list[0]; second := list[1]; third := list[2]; finally list.Free; end;


4

Replace any \r\n with \n, then split using \n: string[] arr = txbUserName.Text.Replace("\r\n", "\n").Split("\n".ToCharArray());


4

Take a look at the String.Split function (not sure of exact syntax, no IDE in front of me). string[] names = txbUserName.Text.Split(Environment.Newline);


4

$data = file_get_contents ($file); // Assuming $file holds path to file if ($data) { $lines = explode("\n\n", $data); foreach ($lines as $line) { list ($phone, $message) = explode("\t", $line, 2); // do whatever you need with it } }


4

To achieve this I usually do a trick: activate CUA mode go to the beginning of line C-RET, now if you move the cursor you should see a rectangular red region Move the cursor down the lines and type space until you've obtained the correct shifting. This can be done also programmatically in some way (in the same way). EDIT: I've just read the article in ...



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