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106

I know of three main languages used commonly in the greater programming and tech community: Textile, Markdown, and reStructuredText. All three can be learned in a couple of hours or "winged" with the cheat sheet nearby. Textile Used by Redmine and the Ruby community 113 questions currently tagged on Stack Overflow The most similar to HTML, but least ...


82

For Markdown -> HTML, there is Showdown StackOverflow itself uses Markdown language for questions and answers ; did you try to take a look at how it works ? Well, it seems it is using PageDown which is available under the MIT License The question Is there any good Markdown Javascript library or control? and its answers might help, too :-) A full editor ...


40

As can be seen, it is surely possible. dog | bird | cat ----|------|---- foo | foo | foo bar | bar | bar baz | baz | baz (this is using GitHub's "Markdown" Edit mode)


22

The forthcoming pandoc 1.8 (or the current github version) can convert Textile to Markdown directly. I don't know how much of Textile it handles, but pandoc index.textile -o index.markdown worked nicely here.


21

You might also consider asciidoc relatively readable markup straightforward command-line use some might perceive it as relatively 'picky' (vs. flexible) with respect to syntax docbook and (x)html output


21

Store markdown: Every view = conversion Every edit = no processing Store html Every view = no processing Every edit = convert to markdown and back Store both Every view = no processing Every edit = convert to html after edit You have to weigh up your processing costs vs. your storage cost.


19

I finally figured out a good way to do this using non-breaking spaces: # Really complicated item   Line 3   # Next complicated item Seems that I found a part of HTML that isn't banned by Redmine... If that changes, you can still work around it using marapet's solution, but for the item after Line 3 you have to copy/paste a ...


16

The Wikipedia page on lightweight markup languages has a good comparison between the various options, as well as showing syntax for common uses (headings, bold, italics, etc.)


13

If you want to force a particular alignment of the cells, you can do the following, where I have left-justified the first column, centered the middle column, and right-justified the last column: dog | bird | cat :-- | :--: | --: foo | foo | foo bar | bar | bar baz | baz | baz


11

Textile You can find a seemingly very fine Javascript implementation of Textile here, and another one there (maybe not so good, but has a nice convert-as-you-type example page). Note: there is a bug in the first implementation I made a link to : horizontal bars are not rendered correctly. To fix it, you can add the following code in the file. ...


10

Because Markdown and Textile are both meant to produce HTML, consider converting all Texile to HTML first. There are a number of Markdown implementations which also support converting HTML back to Markdown. Pandoc being one example. Another possible solution would be using XSLT. Because Textile is more verbose than Markdown, some elements (like tables) ...


10

Since this is a once-only task why not pandoc -f textile -t markdown oldfile.text -o newfile.md? Try it at Try Pandoc.


9

Have you considered something simpler: storing the comments in their original form, together with an extra column saying which format it is stored in (markdown, textile, etc...)? I would think that any superset is either going to result in some loss of information by storing only one of the many possible different ways the syntax can be written in a ...


8

You can include well formatted HTML code in textile: |Model:||Ford <br/> BMW <br/> VM|| Just try it on textile.thresholdstate.com. As the above homepage says: HTML code should be wrapped besides ==, this way calling the following would result in the required output: |Model:||Ford ==<br>== BMW ==<br>== VM|| Both method works for ...


8

According to the Vim plugin that tells Vim how to handle Textile files, it's .textile.


7

Using YARD instead of RDoc directly will let you include Textile or Markdown files so long as their file suffixes are reasonable. I often use something like the following Rake task: desc "Generate RDoc" task :doc => ['doc:generate'] namespace :doc do project_root = File.expand_path(File.join(File.dirname(__FILE__), '..')) doc_destination = ...


7

For those who run into the same problem: If you are using the RedCloth gem you can just define your own method (in one of your helpers). def safe_textilize( s ) if s && s.respond_to?(:to_s) doc = RedCloth.new( s.to_s ) doc.filter_html = true doc.to_html end end Excerpt from the Documentation: Accessors for setting security ...


7

Use Textile.js which is a fully featured Textile parser in JavaScript! Use can try out the Textile live web editor here http://borgar.github.com/textile-js/ I am using it in combination with Markitup Here is my simple code: $(document).ready(function () { init(); }); function init() { var $content = $('.markitup'); // my textarea var ...


7

I wrote a rake task to convert all wiki pages and their versions to markdown. Put this into lib/tasks/convert_textile_to_markdown.rake: task :convert_textile_to_markdown => :environment do require 'tempfile' WikiContent.all.each do |wiki| ([wiki] + wiki.versions).each do |version| textile = version.text src = Tempfile.new('textile') ...


6

If you're using Django, you could try safe markdown: {% load markup %} {{ foo|markdown:"safe" }} You'll need to have markdown installed, and django.contrib.markup in your settings.py apps. If you want to sanitize HTML on save, I've had good luck using feedparser's sanitize (http://www.feedparser.org/). import feedparser body = ...


5

Consider that users might only use one specific syntax element in a posting, so you'd have to check for everything. Looking for "h1." obviously only works if the user uses exactly that element. It's pretty easy with things like headers, but consider that markdown formats *this* as <em>this</em> and Textile will convert that to ...


5

It’s easy to use Showdown with or without jQuery. Here’s a jQuery example: // See http://mathiasbynens.be/notes/showdown-javascript-jquery for a plain JavaScript version as well $(function() { // When using more than one `textarea` on your page, change the following line to match the one you’re after var $textarea = $('textarea'), $preview = ...


5

Try this regex: (?s)bq\.((?!(\r?\n){2}).)*+ meaning: (?s) # enable dot-all option b # match the character 'b' q # match the character 'q' \. # match the character '.' ( # start capture group 1 (?! # start negative look ahead ( # start capture group 2 \r? ...


5

The Showdown Attacklab-Link is down so use https://github.com/coreyti/showdown for your conversion needs :)


5

Not really. It seems you can do a single line HTML escape sequence containing an HTML comment which is passed through. But you probably want something more like the C Preprocessor comments that are simply stripped out completely? ==<!-- html comment -->== Or you could do this, which outputs a multiline html comment, but I doubt it's what you want ...


5

I think you're just confused about the yard options. The help says this: $ yard --help doc Usage: yard doc [options] [source_files [- extra_files]] (if a list of source files is omitted, {lib,app}/**/*.rb ext/**/*.c is used.) Example: yardoc -o documentation/ - FAQ LICENSE The above example outputs documentation for files in lib/**/*.rb to ...


5

Using the <notextile></notextile> tags in the markdown will cause the parser to skip whatever is between those two tags. RedCloth docs


5

Redmine produces this html: <ol> <li>Really complicated item <p>Line 3</p> </li> <li>Next complicated item</li> </ol> By adding @ @ as the second (empty) line : # Really complicated item @ @ Line 3 # Next complicated item the html generated is: <ol> <li>Really complicated ...


5

Hey folks here's a wee hack that addresses the texture issue in a very basic fashion: ggplot2: make the border on one bar darker than the others using R EDIT: I've finally found time to give a brief example of this hack that allows at least 3 types of basic pattern in ggplot2. The code: Example.Data<- data.frame(matrix(vector(), 0, 3, ...


4

There is a library called clothred which should do the job, but I never tested it.



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