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5

Probably the easiest way is to use a plugin style system. If you define it correctly it will make for updating the system easy if there was a bug in one of the features that a client desires. Now you can still ship the program with all the features, but in a config file you could turn features on and off. Now this will require you having a good logging ...


3

Any sort of branching as you suggest is a bad idea. I would recommend that you use Git instead of TFVC in TFS and use Git flow (http://nkdalm.net/Git-Flow) for your branching strategy. As long as your branches are short lived (hours not days) they can be useful. If you end up with a branch for each customer you will end up with too much technical cruft and ...


3

You had it right in you post, login using another user, but when you create the local workspace make sure they point to two (2) separate folders. Don't point the workspaces at the same place on the disk that will not work. So user A's workspace would be c:\A\source User B's workspace would be c:\B\source. All the files will be replicated in both ...


3

Let me preface this answer by saying that there's a lot of terminology overload going on, so I want to define a few things: Server path: the path to the file or folder in the version control system. For example, $/Test/BuildResources is a server path. This is an absolute server path, it is not relative. Local path: the path that you have mapped the ...


2

Visual Studio Online requires IE9 or later. You appear to be using an unsupported browser.


2

No, you can't share those properties. Visual Studio thinks some properties are user based, like what project to start when debugging, the build mode, etc. This is just something they found most useful on a user basis, not on a project basis. You could put the *.user files in your version control system too. Then all user properties will be share too. You ...


2

Branching is best kept for multiple simultaneous, independent changes. Use a Shelveset for the purposes you're discussing. That's how the "Suspend" feature of "My Work" works, and it's how code reviews work. They shelve the changes, attach them to the Code Review work item, and inform the reviewers. The reviewers can unshelve the changes, look at them and ...


2

If you were using SQL Server you could use the Database Project functionality built into Visual Studio (aka SSDT / sqlproj). For Oracle there are 3rd party tools that do a similar thing. The most popular ones are probably the RedGate tools. Source Control for Oracle Schema Compare for Oracle Data Compare for Oracle


2

The correct solution from a "best practices" perspective is to enable multiple check-out. If letting multiple people work on the same file at the same time is causing pain, you have a cultural problem that needs to be solved, not a tools problem.


1

In scrum, user stories are either done or not done at the end of each sprint. No credit is given for stories that are only somewhat done, because by definition they aren't complete and do not deliver the required business value. Therefore, a rating system for user stories is unneeded, beyond "A+" (done) and "F" (not done). I know this seems a bit harsh (I ...


1

I like @MrHinsh's answer better than mine, but I found that you can write to a file at this location: $(TF_BUILD_DROPLOCATION)\logs during build. I assumed that since the path doesn't exist until the log files are copied it would not work. But it does... the TFS/MSBuild log files are simply merged in. And it even seemed to work with a name conflict. For ...


1

Error: The requested URL returned error: 401 while accessing https://github.com/Joey-myproject/repo.git/info/refs fatal: HTTP request failed is an often reoccuring error. One of the reasons of this happening is because the client is not authorized to access to that resource. A general solution is to check for the following: (1) Do you have a stable git ...


1

The format tag does work, but (I love it where there is always a but), it works only in Visual Studio view and not Web View. I have also encountered this issue and still didn't find a good solution for the web client. Aaron


1

Dev12.M62 is TFS 2013 Update 2. Dev12.M53 is an earlier version (obviously). You can download TFS 2013 Update 2 from MSDN and do an upgrade install, which should let you reattach the team project collection. Or, better yet, just upgrade both instances to the latest version (TFS 2013 Update 4).


1

This is a well known problem with any code promotion model. I would suggest that you move instead to a binary promotion model. http://nakedalm.com/building-release-pipeline-release-management-visual-studio-2013/ With a binary promotion model you build the bits once with replaceable parameters and create or use a tool that orchestrates the release and ...


1

No. You enter the override message, then try your check-in again. It reruns the policy at that point in time.


1

If you're versioning dependencies separately from applications that use them, then use NuGet for managing the dependencies. As part of the build process, the packages will be restored. Binaries should basically never be in source control.


1

I happen to find this answer searching for something else and it's one I answer a lot in person so adding mine here anyway and I feel it's a more true answer. The V1 Integration is useful for developers (you can check in code against task that's all you need). I have used both. Maybe for developers TFS is better (assuming they just checking in code) but for ...


1

If you take note of the single checkin that you care about and then right click on the file and select "Annotate" you will see the contents of the file with inline mapping to changesets.


1

You should detach all collections and back them up. Once detached you can move them to the new TFS server and "attach" them as additional collections. This will make the contents available for everyone. Set permission to readonly and you can make sure you never miss anything.


1

In Git a commit hash is unique (it's cryptographically calculated) to the history graph. When you push a commit from one repository to another, the hash stays the same. You can push the same commit (with the same unique hash) to multiple remote repositories. This will result in the same hash in multiple repositories. This is the reason you need to tell TFS ...


1

If the server is configured for TFVC and you have a local Git repo then you cant just push from local to tfs. You have two options. You can: 1) You can create a new team project that is configured for Git and push as normal. 2) you can use TF-Git to push from your local git repo to the TFVC server: ...


1

I find that Sprint Review meetings work best when the Product Owner has reviewed and approved the stories done in the sprint prior to the meeting. The Product Owner should be getting visibility of developed stories as soon as they are complete and possibly even while they are still in progress. This gives them a chance to feedback on the stories while there ...


1

As the Product Owner is part of the Scrum Team, at the end of the Sprint I would expect them to already know what is going on. Any ratting system that you apply to the individual will destroy your team. If they are on the line individually then they will only work to get their stuff done first. You need them to work together as a cohesive team to get the ...



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