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9

Thinktecture Identity Server is for issuing authentication tokens (for things like websites) and is helpful for SSO (again, in browser scenarios). Thinktecture Authorization Server is for issuing authorization tokens (for things like Web APIs). Authorization Server needs the user to authenticate, and so it can rely upon Identity Server for that. ...


4

To get CORS to play nicely with the OWIN Token endpoint, I had to install the Microsoft.Owin.Cors Nuget package and then add this line of code: Startup.Auth.cs using Microsoft.Owin.Cors; // ... public partial class Startup { public void ConfigureAuth(IAppBuilder app) { // ... app.UseCors(CorsOptions.AllowAll); After adding the ...


4

Simply call AddJsonWebToken in you web api config - and add the issuer name, signing key and realm uri. There is no need to call idsrv for validation. Here's a sample: http://leastprivilege.com/2012/05/26/thinktecture-identitymodel-and-asp-net-web-api/


4

Most likely this question will be closed as too localized. Even then, I will put in a few pointers. This is not an answer, but the comments section would be too small for this. What method and how you authenticate is totally up to your subsystem. There is no one way that will work the best for everyone. A SPA is no different that any other application. You ...


3

In short, ASP.NET Identity is an identity management framework (storing user account data, like usernames and passwords). This article goes into depth on the features and design of ASP.NET Identity: http://brockallen.com/2013/10/20/the-good-the-bad-and-the-ugly-of-asp-net-identity/ Thinktecture.IdentityModel is a security helper library for many missing ...


3

That's a bug in 2.6. Please upgrade to 2.6.1


3

If you do "direct" authentication - meaning you can validate the passwords directly - you can use Basic Authentication. I wrote about it here: http://leastprivilege.com/2013/04/22/web-api-security-basic-authentication-with-thinktecture-identitymodel-authenticationhandler/ In addition you can consider using session tokens to get rid of the password on the ...


3

The session token facility does not have that feature. We wanted to keep it simple to get around the "type in password on every application start" problem. Revocation is hard to achieve without a complete data storage backend (that would work in web farms etc..). You shouldn't store data that might change over session time in the session token.


3

You are correct that ASP.NET Membership provider is not compatible with the SimpleMembershipProvider however SimpleMembershipProvider does support ValidateUser, see here. Assuming SimpleMembership is correctly configured and initalised you should still be able to call Membership.ValidateUser(). If you have already tried Membership.ValidateUser() and got an ...


3

There are a few things you need to do. Create an OAuth client that will make token requests, and use that to get access tokens from identity server allowing you to access your web api endpoints. To do this your OAuth client needs to have implicit flow enabled. You then make a login request to Identity server, typically through a pop up window to allow your ...


3

The AuthenticationHandler only does authentication. You'd need to set the roles in a separate step (e.g. in a delegating handler). If you are on Web API v2 - I'd rather recommend switching to the basic auth OWIN middleware https://github.com/thinktecture/Thinktecture.IdentityModel/tree/master/source/Thinktecture.IdentityModel.Owin.BasicAuthentication This ...


2

WIF is generally not designed for this. And only certain token types support this at all.


2

OK - I think I now remember how that works - When the session cookie is written, it is also cached in memory (regardless of IsReference mode). At read time, the identifier in the cookie is used to try to rehydrate the session token from the cache first. Only if this fails, the actual cookie is used (I guess to save the cost of validation). This explains ...


2

So after waiting a few minutes and receiving no replies and desperately needing this functionality I dived into the Thinktecture IdentityModel 4.5 source code to see what was going on and it seems this feature is not actually supported. Not only is it not supported but from the looks of it cookie mapping is not actually implemented. I forked the repository ...


2

You may be looking to do more work than necessary - you don't need to test ThinkTecture's ClaimsAuthorizeAttribute, because ThinkTecture have already done that. You should write tests which test your own code - namely the outcome of the actions performed inside your override of CheckAccess. If you want to check whether the ThinkTecture attribute works as it ...


2

As indicated by Dominick Baier, I was able to create a nice solution using Thinktecture.IdentityModel. I've posted the code in a Gist. This specific functionality seems to be undocumented but I was able to piece together little bits and pieces from related blog posts and documentation. I'd appreciate any feedback as I'm sure there is some corner of ...


2

Try manually adding the System.IdentityModel dll reference from the assemblies. This is what worked for me. -Right click project, add reference -Assemblies, Framework, System.IdentityModel v4.0.0.0


2

In our system, we have custom claims defined in the user database. The custom claims define the menu items that the user has access to. When the user logs in (using Thinktecture Identity Server), those claims get added to the user token as additional claims. When our application displays the user's menu, it gets the claims from the current principal and ...


2

Finally, after reading a lot I have this: In AngularJS: 'use strict'; app.factory('authService', ['$http', '$q', 'localStorageService', function ($http, $q, localStorageService) { var serviceBase = 'http://localhost:64346/'; var authServiceFactory = {}; var _authData = localStorageService.get('authorizationData'); var _authentication = { isAuth: ...


2

There's an event you can handle - FederatedAuthentication.ServiceConfigurationCreated. This allows setting the claims authorization manager programmatically. See here: https://github.com/thinktecture/Thinktecture.AuthorizationServer/blob/master/source/WebHost/Global.asax.cs


2

I'd suggest starting with the wikis of each project. They go into details about the purpose of each project and how to get started: https://github.com/thinktecture/Thinktecture.IdentityServer.v2/wiki https://github.com/thinktecture/Thinktecture.AuthorizationServer/wiki


2

As you can see from http://developer.xamarin.com/guides/android/under_the_hood/assemblies/ the .NET framework in Mono for Android doesn't seem to contain the assembly System.Web.Extensions Edit: this means that you are referencing a library that was created for desktop use, and has not been recompiled with the Android reference assemblies. This is not ...


1

You should use the created channel like this: private static void CallServiceReference(SecurityToken token) { ServiceReference1.ClaimsServiceContractClient svcRef = new ServiceReference1.ClaimsServiceContractClient(); svcRef.ChannelFactory.Credentials.SupportInteractive = false; var svcChannel = ...


1

If you need both, then configure the server for hrd and then as a RP you can configure IdentityServer as a RP to its own hrd endpoint. There's an issue in the github issue tracker with more info (you'll have to search there).


1

The problem was that the CorsHandler needed to be added Before the AuthenticationHandler. But I did that: config.EnableCors(); // ... config.MessageHandlers.Add(new AuthenticationHandler(authentication)); But that will make the CorsHandler come after the AuthenticationHandler in config.MessageHandlers. Because .EnableCors adds the handler via a ...


1

As the error message in your question title states, the response is lacking an Access-Control-Allow-Origin header. According to the response contents you posted at the end of your question, the server is not including this header. So, the issue is with your server. You'll need to include this header in your response.


1

As commented on your question by @leastprivilege, you can easily achieve SSO for both your sites just by defining both sites as RP's (relying parties) trusting the same IDP. That would of course simplify your authentication solution architecture. Having said that, passive authentication using WS-Fed, is still vulnerable to replay attacks. Although the token ...


1

You can create an AuthorizationContext yourself and you can call the registered authorization manager via the FederatedAuthentication class. Thinktecture.IdentityModel also has a static class called ClaimsAuthorization that helps in that process.


1

You can add/remove claims via the AddClaim/RemoveClaim API on the UserAccount class. See the SingleTenantWebApp sample for an example: https://github.com/brockallen/BrockAllen.MembershipReboot/blob/master/samples/SingleTenantWebApp/Areas/UserAccount/Controllers/HomeController.cs#L28


1

To enable encrypted tokens with Web API, I found this helpful: http://www.alexthissen.nl/blogs/main/archive/2011/07/18/using-active-profile-for.aspx Towards the end you'll see code setting the ServiceTokenResolver property on the Configuration property of a SecurityTokenHandlerCollection using a X509 certificate from the LocalMachine store. The ...



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