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12

The catch: you have to use it too reap the benefits of all the work. But seriously reinventing boost is madness. Find what their (management) concerns are and work to break those issues down. Or accept the pay, and keep your head down, Or start looking. Madness all round.


11

Nothing wrong with the boost licence, but the developer guidelines are a bit to relaxed - once a library is in the developer can change anything he wants - behavior and interface. It happened to me with boost::exception (1.37 -> 1.38) where parts of the documented interface (functions and macros) just changed or simply dissapeared (without even a notice in ...


10

Subclassing (which does involve overriding, as the term is generally used) is generally much preferable to "monkey-patching" (stuffing altered methods into existing classes or modules), even when the latter is available (built-in types, meaning ones implemented in C, can protect themselves against monkey-patching, and most of them do). For example, if your ...


9

In CSS Files. expressions(code), behavior:url(), url(javascript:code), and -moz-binding:url() all have potential security issues. Behavior can't be cross domain so that removes some threat, but generally speaking you do need to sanitize it somehow. This site does an in depth analysis of CSS security issues if you scroll down (Note: This link is for ...


8

Regardless what the license says, your employer might have a different opinion about including third-party sourcecode into the project.


7

Some parts of boost are very incestuous. To use a small boost library, often you end up (unknowingly) #including a huge amount of "junk". It is actually quite astonishing if you generate a dependency graph. Perhaps you don't need to support the dozen or so platforms that boost does, so a smaller amount of code would be easier to maintain. Your employer or ...


6

TeamCity, by default, is configured to cache the exported sources (Checkout mode: Automatically on server). This means that the first build may take some time, but subsequent builds will be significantly faster as it only loads the changed files. Automatic clean checkouts will only happen in certain circumstances. If you have checked in the entire 3rd ...


5

Here are some possible issues: boost is a big dependency to have on your project. Maybe they're weary of adding such a dependency only for a few classes. You can get around this by using the bcp tool to extract only the parts of boost that you need. related to the former: once boost is in, it's possible that some programmers on the team will go wild with ...


5

As long as you validate it somehow you should be good. GOLDEN RULE: Do NOT trust the user


4

You could define your own const fields in your assembly like so: internal const string Empty = ""; And then perform a check against String.Empty, but it's pretty much a futile effort. You'd have to perform a check everywhere you access String.Empty and effectively replace it (since you'd check at the point of comparison, there's no point in actually ...


4

(I work on Caja at Google, but this is not an official position; it is solely my perspective on the current state of the world.) As far as I know, Yahoo is no longer using Caja, not because they have switched to something else but by discontinuing the project in question. I was never very familiar with the details, but I understand it was used in a “gadget” ...


4

Sql-server may not be the best tool, but you could use a script like this, it will split up all the words at the spaces and take the difference between the list words. So a word in 1 text that doesn't exists in the other text will be included in the output, finally the script will concatinate the words: declare @str1 varchar(2000) = 'abc This is for test. ...


3

It may be overkill, but did you consider using virtualenv? It would let you have a virtual Python installation that used the standard for everything except the libraries you want to keep separate.


3

Some possibilities come to mind: Change CI to update incrementally. Avoid svn:externals, instead symbolic link the checkout during the build.


3

A few points here: If you have clashing JARS in your WAR file, then you're asking for trouble. You should sort out which ones your application needs, and discard the rest. otherwise, you run the risk of tomcat loading the "wrong" classes. JWSDP 2.0 is very old, and contains an old, pre-release version of JAXB. I'd strongly recommend using the latest JAXB ...


3

The version in the debian repositories isn't the newest and when downloading a new version of boost, you have to download almost 30MB and compile the libraries you want to use, which is extremely horrible, and you have to read some of the documentation twice before understanding it. (Sorry, these are the only negative points I found.)


3

You can set PYTHONPATH to a directory with additional modules. And if you use Python 2.6 or newer, you can just use the default per-user module directory without additional configuration.


3

Remember too that the GWT compiler needs actual Java source to compile to javascript, so it isn't enough that the classes are available and that all are serializable. For RPC to send the classes over the wire, they must be able to be used as JS when they get to the client. That said, take a look in gwt-user, at the module ...


3

I have contacted the delicious.com support. The issue is with their api for several days and did not noted until reported. Now its working.


2

Boost has one of the least restrictive licences I am aware of, so it is hard to see what any catch there could be. Of course there is a catch to trying to re-create Boost: there are a lot of subtleties to the operation of the Boost libraries that will be very hard to re-create. Follow the Boost mailing list for a while to see the kind of depth of inspection ...


2

RestrictedPython (shown in the link you provided) looks promising. I can't say I've actually tried to do such a thing, however. Another option that might work is building an extremely minimal Linux distribution, then replicating it in a virtualized environment for each user. Use the virtual machine's monitoring mechanisms to restrict CPU and memory usage by ...


2

You could use setuptools to create egg files for your libraries, assuming they aren't available in egg form already. You could then bundle the eggs alongside your software, which would need to either install them, or ensure that they were on the import path. This has some complexities, i.e. if your libraries have C-extensions, then your eggs become ...


2

If the user is the only person with the ability to see their custom CSS, then there is not really any danger. They could ruin their own experience on your site, but not that of others. However, if their custom CSS is displayed to other users, then they could potentially use it to completely mess up the styles of your site as you intended. For example, they ...


2

In your application core, define an interface for any services provided by the third-party product. In your infrastructure layer, implement each interface as an Adapter/Wrapper to the third-party product. Code against the interface everywhere else in your application. Use Inversion of Control to register implementations of your service interfaces and ...


2

I'm not up to speed with Prism, but is this a release version? Anyway, if the authors didn't strong-name their assemblies they did not intend their assemblies and derived ones to be put in the GAC. And maybe you should just re-think that decision, the GAC should be used very rarely.


2

The decompiler I use is JAD. It has an eclipse plugin, Jadclipse. You can download JAD from http://www.varaneckas.com/jad You can get Jadclipse from http://sourceforge.net/projects/jadclipse/. Click on the download jar and then simply copy the jar into your Eclipse/plugins directory, and restart Eclipse. Set up the path to JAD from ...


2

Came up with a way to do it using OpenXML SDK 2.0. General Steps: Create your macro code and save it in .xlsm format, say snorehorse.xlsm. Open snorehorse.xlsm in the OpenXML Productivity Toolkit and do a Reflect Code on the tree root. Find the macro's binary code. It's in a string format and looks like random characters. In your IDE, add a reference to ...


2

The correct way is to follow PSR-0 from the PHP Framework Interop Group. This suggests that your directory should be structured in a /path/to/app/lib/vendor/class/ format. So each separate vendor should have its own tree in your lib directory. That means you should have ../lib/CodeIgnitor, ../lib/AWS/, '../lib/Facebook/, etc. Each vendor should also be ...



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