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Multiple Objects of the same class have the identical data members in them. Whenever a function gets called on an object, the change in the data members inside that function always occurs on that particular object's data members. So how does the compiler know which object's data members to access and modify? This is done using a special pointer known as this pointer. this is a keyword in C++ Language.

Whenever a function gets called on some object, compiler automatically creates this pointer and stores that object's address in it. this pointer is sent to that function by the compiler itself and there is no need to explicitly declare it or pass it to the function. The data members and functions of that object could be accessed using this pointer and the arrow member operator (->) inside that function. An example could be created thus.

void myClass :: myFunction ()
{
  this->myVariable = 10 ;
}

which is equivalent to

void myClass :: myFunction ()
{
  myVariable = 10 ;
}

Sometimes, the object is returned itself using this pointer. Its statement would be like this.

return (*this) ;
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