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84

Rake and Thor serve different purposes. Rake is a general build script tool that is project-specific. In other words, you put your rakefile into your project folder and in your project's source control, and you can create, build and do other automation tasks that are specific to your project in that rakefile. Rake requires a rakefile to run. Thor is a ...


29

It seems the proper Thor-way to do this is using default_task: class Commands < Thor desc "whatever", "The default task to run when no command is given" def whatever ... end default_task :whatever end Commands.start If for whatever reason that isn't what you need, you should be able to do something like class Commands < Thor ... end ...


21

Disclaimer: I'm the author of boson. I've used both and thor was what inspired me to write boson. While the two have overlapping functionality, I see them as having different goals. Thor is a scripting framework which quickly and beautifully gives applications a commandline interface. The 116 gems (including rails) that depend on it are good evidence of ...


18

Another way of doing this is to use register: class CLI < Thor register(SubTask, 'sub', 'sub <command>', 'Description.') end class SubTask < Thor desc "bar", "..." def bar() # ... end end CLI.start Now - assuming your executable is called foo - you can call: $ foo sub bar In the current thor version (0.15.0.rc2) there is a bug ...


14

Sounds like your app is already using bundler and you have a bundler-inside-bundler problem. Try this: Bundler.with_clean_env do puts `bundle install` end I'm guessing what's happening is that your outer bundler sets the BUNDLE_GEMFILE env variable to your app's Gemfile, and then your inner bundler ends up inheriting it.


13

All Ruby 1.9 strings have an encoding attached to them. YAML encodes some non-UTF8 strings as binary, even when they look innocent, without any high-bit characters. You might think that your code is always using UTF8, but builtins can return non-UTF8 strings (ex File path routines). To avoid binary encoding, make sure all your strings encodings are UTF-8 ...


11

For setting up Ubuntu chores, Chef might be a better option. From their web site: Chef is an open source systems integration framework, built to bring the benefits of server configuration management to your entire infrastructure. It's written in Ruby and there are tons of Chef recipes/cookbooks. Chef will handle setting up Ubuntu and installing ...


10

Make the shebang line #!/usr/bin/env ruby and then at the end of your script add App.start


10

Just shell out: result = %x(git log) puts result or system('git log') if you just want to pass the output to the terminal. There is also the grit gem that abstracts the Git tools into a Ruby library: require 'grit' repo = Grit::Repo.new("/path/to/repo") repo.commits.each do |commit| puts "#{commit.id}: #{commit.message}" end


10

I know this has been answered already but I think this is a better answer so I thought I'd contribute it anyway. Thor has a method you can use to change the behavior so errors cause non-zero exit codes. It's not documented very well (IMHO). class Test < Thor def self.exit_on_failure? true end desc "example", "an example task" def example ...


8

au BufRead,BufNewFile *.thor set filetype=ruby I think should suffice... maybe this if you want to customize it later: au BufRead,BufNewFile *.thor set filetype=thor au! Syntax thor source $HOME/.vim/syntax/thor.vim and copy ruby .vim syntax highlight file to $HOME/.vim/syntax/thor.vim


8

Indeed it can! You are looking for ask. An example: class PhotoonRails < Thor # [1] desc "install", "install my cool stuff" def install say("We're about to install your system.. blaa, blaa, blaa... We have to know you're Flick ID, get i here http://idgettr.com") flickr_id = ask("Flickr ID: ") ...


7

By using instance variables, it should work. @name = name template("source","target") My template looks like this: <test><%= @name %></test> This works for me. I haven't tried the passing of specific values.


7

I can't find any documentation to answer this, but reading through the source of the Bundler CLI, it appears that if you were trying to reference the :author_email parameter inside the template, Author email: <%= config[:author_email] %> works.


7

Use an over-arching module, let's say Foo, inside of which you will define all sub-modules and sub-classes. Start the definition of this module in a single foo.thor file, which is in the directory from which you will run all Thor tasks. At the top of the Foo module in this foo.thor, define this method: # Load all our thor files module Foo def ...


7

After version 1.9.3p125, ruby build-in YAML engine will treat all BINARY encoding differently than before. All you need to do is to set correct non-BINARY encoding before your String.to_yaml. in Ruby 1.9, All String object have attached a Encoding object and as following blog ( by James Edward Gray II ) mentioned, ruby have build in three type of encoding ...


6

Yes, there is another way of doing this. require 'thor' class TestApp < Thor desc "hello NAMES", "long desc" def hello(*names) say "hello #{names.join('; ')}" end end And it can be called like this: $ thor test_app:hello first second third hello first; second; third


6

desc is pretty easy to implement, the trick is to use Module.method_added: class DescMethods def self.desc(m) @last_message = m end def self.method_added(m) puts "#{m} described as #{@last_message}" end end any class that inherits from DescMethods will have a desc method like Thor. For each method a message will be printed with the method ...


6

You can use invoke to run other tasks: def show_version invoke :connect_to_database # ... end That will also make sure that they are run only once, otherwise you can just call the method as usual, e.g. def show_version connect_to_database # ... end Or you could add the call to the constructor, to have it run first in every invocation: def ...


6

Setting the RAILS_ENV environment variable to 'production' right above therequirestatement should work. I used conditional assignment here to default the environment to 'production' if the environment variable is not set ahead of time. class CheckData < Thor ENV['RAILS_ENV'] ||= 'production' require File.expand_path('config/environment.rb') end If ...


5

I got a tweet from Yehuda Katz. (Thanks again!) Here's the solution: class YourApp < Thor check_unknown_options! # ... end I tested and added it into my project. Here's the new behavior: $ maid --slient Unknown switches '--slient' $ maid rules.rb Could not find task "rules.rb". See the full code on GitHub.


5

In thor/spec/fixtures/script.thor you can find such usage: desc "hidden TYPE", "this is hidden", :hide => true def hidden(type) [type] end


5

Here is a possible solution : def ssh(cmd) Net::SSH.start( server_ip, user, :port => port) do |session| result = nil session.exec!(cmd) do |channel, stream, data| if data =~ /^\[sudo\] password for user:/ channel.send_data 'your_sudo_password' else result << data end end result # content of 'cmd' ...


5

in your gem project, you need to include a "bin" folder. this folder needs to include the ruby script that is your generator, without a file extension. if you are using something like jeweler, it will automatically scan the bin folder during packaging. when the gem is installed, the gem system will put the files from the bin folder into your ruby ...


5

Don't know if you found your solution, but there's a Railscast episode on how to make generators using Thor as was done in Rails 3. This should help. There's also this tutorial via Platformatec. I realize you don't want to make Rails generators, but the basic idea behind how they work is pretty well explained, and I think this will help you get on the right ...


5

I had trouble getting this to work at first, too. Here's the pattern that I've started using: $ cat cli.rb #!/usr/bin/env ruby require 'rubygems' require 'thor' require 'thor/group' module CLI class Greeter < Thor::Group def say_hi say "Hi" end def say_goodbye say "Goodbye" end end end module CLI class Crud < Thor ...


5

If you set up your .thor file like this: <my_thor_commands>/ templates/ bin/ lib/ ... main.thor thor install <my_thor_command> will look for a file called main.thor, and then install it and anything else in <my_thor_command>. After that, you can rely on: def self.source_root File.dirname(__FILE__) end which will ...


5

The hash is frozen: "Prevents further modifications to obj. A RuntimeError will be raised if modification is attempted. There is no way to unfreeze a frozen object." You can copy options to a new hash (will be unfrozen) and modifying that instead. new_options = options.dup options = new_options options.merge!(:a => "this will work now") Or if ...


5

I hope this will help someone searching. I also needed to sudo during deployment (restarting thin instances) # deploy.rake require 'net/ssh' # INITIALIZE CONSTANTS HERE HOST = 'yourwebsite.com' USER = 'admin' PASSWORD = 'your server password' # or use ENV variables? # etc. namespace :deploy do namespace :staging do task :restart do commands ...


5

i did not test that out, but i think from what you linked to in the ActiveAdmin generator it might work like this: inject_into_file "config/routes.rb", " do_stuff(foo)\n", :before => /^end/ this should insert your code right before an end token that starts at the beginning of a line. this only works for properly formatted routes files though....



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