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43

#include <boost/thread/tss.hpp> static boost::thread_specific_ptr< MyClass> instance; if( ! instance.get() ) { // first time called by this thread // construct test element to be used in all subsequent calls from this thread instance.reset( new MyClass); } instance->doSomething();


33

Thread-local storage duration is a term used to refer to data that is seemingly global or static storage duration (from the viewpoint of the functions using it) but in actual fact, there is one copy per thread. It adds to the current automatic (exists during a block/function), static (exists for the program duration) and dynamic (exists on the heap between ...


28

It is worth noting that C++11 introduces the thread_local keyword. Here is an example from Storage duration specifiers: #include <iostream> #include <string> #include <thread> #include <mutex> thread_local unsigned int rage = 1; std::mutex cout_mutex; void increase_rage(const std::string& thread_name) { ++rage; ...


26

The speed depends on the TLS implementation. Yes, you are correct that TLS can be as fast as a pointer lookup. It can even be faster on systems with a memory management unit. For the pointer lookup you need help from the scheduler though. The scheduler must - on a task switch - update the pointer to the TLS data. Another fast way to implement TLS is ...


21

When you declare a variable thread_local then each thread has its own copy. When you refer to it by name, then the copy associated with the current thread is used. e.g. thread_local int i=0; void f(int newval){ i=newval; } void g(){ std::cout<<i; } void threadfunc(int id){ f(id); ++i; g(); } int main(){ i=9; std::thread ...


13

It's a little complicated (this document explains it in great detail), but it's basically neither. Instead the compiler puts a special .tdata section in the executable, which contains all the thread-local variables. At runtime, a new data section for each thread is created with a copy of the data in the (read-only) .tdata section, and when threads are ...


13

Foundation provides -[NSThread threadDictionary]. You can use this to store thread-local Objective-C objects, which could include an NSValue wrapping the address of any dynamic storage. Note that Cocoa is moving towards thread-blind execution of threaded code, where you submit blocks of code to be run on any available system-owned thread. This is the model ...


12

Have a read of the Wikipedia entry. Thread-local storage isn't something that's particular to C++. Sometimes it goes by different names, like "TLS" (just an abbreviation of thread-local storage), or "thread-specific storage" (TSS). Most operating systems provide APIs to access per-thread storage. For example, Windows has a bunch of API functions starting ...


10

The documentation is being too helpful when it says that the initial value the system allocates for TLS is zero. The statement is true but not useful. The reason is that applications can free TLS slots by calling TlsFree, so when you allocate a slot, there is no guarantee that you are the first person ever to be given that slot. Therefore, you don't know ...


9

Storage space: size of the variable * number of threads, or possibly (sizeof(var) + sizeof(var*)) * number of threads. There are two basic ways of implementing thread-local storage: Using some sort of system call that gets information about the current kernel thread. Sloooow. Using some pointer, probably in a processor register, that is set properly at ...


9

boost::thread_specific_ptr is the best way as it portable solution. On Linux & GCC you may use __thread modifier. So your instance variable will look like: static __thread MyClass *instance = new MyClass();


8

Thread locals in D are really fast. Here are my tests. 64 bit Ubuntu, core i5, dmd v2.052 Compiler options: dmd -O -release -inline -m64 // this loop takes 0m0.630s void main(){ int a; // register allocated for( int i=1000*1000*1000; i>0; i-- ){ a+=9; } } // this loop takes 0m1.875s int a; // thread local in D, not static void ...


8

If you're using Pthreads you can do the following: //declare static data members pthread_key_t AnotherClass::key_value; pthread_once_t AnotherClass::key_init_once = PTHREAD_ONCE_INIT; //declare static function void AnotherClass::init_key() { //while you can pass a NULL as the second argument, you //should pass some valid destrutor function that ...


8

One needs to be very careful in interpreting benchmark results. For example, a recent thread in the D newsgroups concluded from a benchmark that dmd's code generation was causing a major slowdown in a loop that did arithmetic, but in actuality the time spent was dominated by the runtime helper function that did long division. The compiler's code generation ...


7

A description for how it works on Linux by Uli Drepper (maintainer of glibc) can be found here: www.akkadia.org/drepper/tls.pdf The requirement to handle dynamically loaded modules etc. make the entire mechanism a bit convoluted, which perhaps partly explains why the document weights in at 79 pages (!). Memory-usage-wise, each per-thread variable obviously ...


6

Do Java ThreadLocal variables produce thread-local values if they are used as instance variables. Yes, they do. Think about it: Not the ThreadLocal is static or non-static, only the reference to the ThreadLocal is static or not. The object itself looks always the same. Does any of the above approaches make sense for the case described, or should the ...


6

__thread is not in C99. It is a GNU C extension - the section you have linked to is within Extensions to the C Language Family. It describes the extension in terms of changes to the C99 standard, presumably as preparation to have it adopted in a future revision of the standard.


6

Replace ptr.release(); with ptr.reset();.


5

I believe the point that Apple's docs are making is that you cannot use pthread_setspecific to set a value and then expect it to be available in threadDictionary. I wouldn't expect them to directly interfere with each other; they're just separate. That said, if this is iOS-specific code, then the strongly preferred way to manage this is with GCD rather than ...


5

You should not use ThreadLocal with parallel Tasks, it is very hard to clean up after yourself if you have resources that need disposing unless you track the objects you create as you create them. This is because Tasks are created on the ThreadPool so there is no way to guarantee to get back on the same thread again to do your cleanup work1. A better way to ...


5

According to the C++ Standard When thread_local is applied to a variable of block scope the storage-class-specifier static is implied if it does not appear explicitly So it means that this definition void f() { thread_local vector<int> V; V.clear(); ... // use V as a temporary variable } is equivalent to void f() { static ...


5

Warning: this is guesswork. Suppose you're writing a server, and serving a request means you have to talk to a bunch of different services. Being a thoroughly modern developer, you make these requests asynchronously, coordinating when everything's replied (or timed out) in order to respond to the original request. That means the work corresponding to a ...


5

Rather than using FS:[18h] you should probably use PsGetCurrentThreadTeb. Even then, I think you'd be relying on details that might change in future OS releases (potentially including service packs). Instead, couldn't you use KeGetCurrentProcessorNumber as an index into an array where you can store a pointer to your context information? (Provided that ...


5

Yes, it should be uniqueNum.get(). The JDK 7 docs get it right, and use better names: import java.util.concurrent.atomic.AtomicInteger; public class ThreadId { // Atomic integer containing the next thread ID to be assigned private static final AtomicInteger nextId = new AtomicInteger(0); // Thread local variable containing each thread's ID ...


5

First some clarification. ThreadLocal leak happens when you place some custom class in ThreadLocal inside your application and you undeploy/redeploy that application without clearing ThreadLocal first. When this happens, thread still holds a reference to your class, which holds a reference to ClassLoader, which in turns holds references to all other classes ...


4

The Standard describes thread_local as a storage specifier like the others (static, extern etc.) in ยง7.1.1. There is no restriction to "simple" data types by any definition of that word. The problem is briefly discussed in a pre-C++11 discussion document N2147 (see the section "Thread Variable Dynamic Initialization"). That includes a description of the key ...


4

To answer your headline question, ThreadLocal provides each thread with a separate value of that ThreadLocal instance. So if you have two instances in different places, each thread will have separate values in each. This is why ThreadLocals are so often static; if all you want is a separate value for a variable per thread, then you only need one ThreadLocal ...


4

You can create a structure that holds the incoming request, and you pass this around instead of the actual request, then you just put in any fields you need. Obviously this doesn't completely remove the need to pass an object around, but normally you are passing the request around anyway. From most of the driver stuff I've seen (which admittedly isn't a ...


4

Thread-local storage is in every aspect like static (= global) storage, only that each thread has a separate copy of the object. The object's life time starts either at thread start (for global variables) or at first initialization (for block-local statics), and ends when the thread ends (i.e. when join() is called). Consequently, only variables that could ...


4

Upgrade your gcc to gcc-4.5 or above (through macports or something). TLS operation on mac is much more expensive than on linux or other unix, because it is emulated. The following code: __thread int foo; void f() { ++foo; } on linux, it would be translated to this: f: pushl %ebp movl %esp, %ebp movl ...



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