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338

One possible (and common) use is when you have some object that is not thread-safe, but you want to avoid synchronizing access to that object (I'm looking at you, SimpleDateFormat). Instead, give each thread its own instance of the object. For example: public class Foo { // SimpleDateFormat is not thread-safe, so give one to each thread private ...


189

Since a ThreadLocal is a reference to data within a given Thread, you can end up with classloading leaks when using ThreadLocals in application servers which use thread pools. You need to be very careful about cleaning up any ThreadLocals you get() or set() by using the ThreadLocal's remove() method. If you do not clean up when you're done, any references ...


52

Many frameworks use ThreadLocals to maintain some context related to the current thread. For example when the current transaction is stored in a ThreadLocal, you don't need to pass it as a parameter through every method call, in case someone down the stack needs access to it. Web applications might store information about the current request and session in a ...


49

A thread is a unit of execution and so multiple thread can execute the same code at the same time. If multiple threads execute on an object/instance at the same time they will share the instance variables. Each thread will have its own local variables but it is difficult to share these across objects without passing parameters. It is best explained by way ...


39

In Python, everything is shared, except for function-local variables (because each function call gets its own set of locals, and threads are always separate function calls.) And even then, only the variables themselves (the names that refer to objects) are local to the function; objects themselves are always global, and anything can refer to them. The Thread ...


36

Modern JVMs implement ThreadLocal using an unsynchronised HashMap in the Thread.currentThread() object. This makes it extremely fast (though not nearly as fast as using a regular field access, of course), as well as ensuring that the ThreadLocal object gets tidied up when the Thread dies. Of course, new Object() is also very fast these days, and the Garbage ...


35

All of the answers here are correct, but a little disappointing as they somewhat gloss over how cool ThreadLocal's implementation is. I was just looking at the source code for ThreadLocal and was pleasantly impressed by how it's implemented. The Naive Implementation If I asked you to implement a ThreadLocal<T> class given the API described in the ...


33

Thread-local storage duration is a term used to refer to data that is seemingly global or static storage duration (from the viewpoint of the functions using it) but in actual fact, there is one copy per thread. It adds to the current automatic (exists during a block/function), static (exists for the program duration) and dynamic (exists on the heap between ...


28

Consider the following code: #/usr/bin/env python from time import sleep from random import random from threading import Thread, local data = local() def bar(): print "I'm called from", data.v def foo(): bar() class T(Thread): def run(self): sleep(random()) data.v = self.getName() # Thread-1 and Thread-2 accordingly ...


28

DynamicVariable is an implementation of the loan and dynamic scope patterns. Use-case of DynamicVariable is pretty much similar to ThreadLocal in Java (as a matter of fact, DynamicVariable uses InheritableThreadLocal behind the scenes) - it's used, when you need to do a computation within an enclosed scope, where every thread has it's own copy of the ...


28

PermGen exhaustions in combination with ThreadLocal are often caused by classloader leaks. An example: Imagine an application server which has a pool of worker threads. They will be kept alive until application server termination. A deployed web application uses a static ThreadLocal in one of its classes in order to store some thread-local data, an instance ...


27

Bear in mind that that was in 2008 - I believe that .NET 4 is a lot faster for ThreadStatic fields than .NET 3.5 was. I can't remember for sure, but you could run tests if you want. That said, I'm not really convinced by the test description - because it's unrealistic. Do you really need to repeatedly read a thread-local field in a loop? Isn't it more ...


24

You mean java.lang.ThreadLocal. It's quite simple, really, it's just a Map of name-value pairs stored inside each Thread object (see the Thread.threadLocals field). The API hides that implementation detail, but that's more or less all there is to it.


24

Running unpublished benchmarks, ThreadLocal.get takes around 35 cycle per iteration on my machine. Not a great deal. In Sun's implementation a custom linear probing hash map in Thread maps ThreadLocals to values. Because it is only ever accessed by a single thread, it can be very fast. Allocation of small objects take a similar number of cycles, although ...


22

I disagree entirely. TLS is extremely useful. It should be used with care, just as globals should be used with care; but saying it shouldn't be used at all is just as ridiculous as saying globals should never be used. For example, I store the currently active request in TLS. This makes it accessible from my logging class, without having to pass the ...


21

Good question, I've been asking myself that recently. To give you definite numbers, the benchmarks below (in Scala, compiled to virtually the same bytecodes as the equivalent Java code): var cnt: String = "" val tlocal = new java.lang.ThreadLocal[String] { override def initialValue = "" } def loop_heap_write = { ...


21

I avoid this sort of usage of threadlocals, because it introduces an implicit non-local coupling. I frequently use models in all kinds of non-HTTP-oriented ways (local management commands, data import/export, etc). If I access some threadlocals data in models.py, now I have to find some way to ensure that it is always populated whenever I use my models, and ...


21

When you declare a variable thread_local then each thread has its own copy. When you refer to it by name, then the copy associated with the current thread is used. e.g. thread_local int i=0; void f(int newval){ i=newval; } void g(){ std::cout<<i; } void threadfunc(int id){ f(id); ++i; g(); } int main(){ i=9; std::thread ...


20

In Java, if you have a datum that can vary per-thread, your choices are to pass that datum around to every method that needs (or may need) it, or to associate the datum with the thread. Passing the datum around everywhere may be workable if all your methods already need to pass around a common "context" variable. If that's not the case, you may not want ...


19

ThreadLocal uses a WeakReference internally. If the ThreadLocal is not strongly referenced, it will be garbage-collected, even though various threads have values stored via that ThreadLocal. Additionally, ThreadLocal values are actually stored in the Thread; if a thread dies, all of the values associated with that thread through a ThreadLocal are ...


17

I don't think there is anything wrong with threadlocals - yes, it is a global variable, but besides that it's a normal tool. We use it just for this purpose (storing subdomain model in the context global to the current request from middleware) and it works perfectly. So I say, use the right tool for the job, in this case threadlocals make your app much more ...


17

They say that [ThreadStatic] is much more performant than Thread.AllocateDataSlot. The implementation of ThreadLocal<T> (according to Reflector) has 16 dedicated types that just use [ThreadStatic] under the cover. Once they are used up and not freed, TheadLocal<T> switches over to Thread.AllocateDataSlot. (Actually it seems to be 16^3 slots per ...


14

Thread local storage is useful for instance if you have a thread worker pool and each thread needs access to its own resource, like a network or database connection. Note that the threading module uses the regular concept of threads (which have access to the process global data), but these are not too useful due to the global interpreter lock. The different ...


13

Sigh, this is old news Well, a bit late to the party on this one. In October 2007, Josh Bloch (co-author of java.lang.ThreadLocal along with Doug Lea) wrote: "The use of thread pools demands extreme care. Sloppy use of thread pools in combination with sloppy use of thread locals can cause unintended object retention, as has been noted in many ...


13

There is only one unique instance of the FacesContext per thread. The FacesServlet creates a ThreadLocal<FacesContext> on the beginning of the HTTP servlet request and removes it on the end of the HTTP servlet response associated with the HTTP servlet request. Whenever you do a FacesContext#getCurrentInstance() in your JSF code, you'll always get the ...


13

Something the blog post noted in the comments doesn't make explicit, but I find to be very important, is that [ThreadStatic] doesn't automatically initialize things for every thread. For example, say you have this: [ThreadStatic] private int Foo = 42; The first thread that uses this will see Foo initialized to 42. But subsequent threads will not. The ...


12

Have a read of the Wikipedia entry. Thread-local storage isn't something that's particular to C++. Sometimes it goes by different names, like "TLS" (just an abbreviation of thread-local storage), or "thread-specific storage" (TSS). Most operating systems provide APIs to access per-thread storage. For example, Windows has a bunch of API functions starting ...


12

The point is to have the request and response objects in classes that would otherwise would not have them (for example they are not servlets). One example are JSF managed beans - their methods do not take HttpServletRequest parameters, and so you can obtain the request via the FacesContext, which has them in ThreadLocal variables. The reason this works is ...


11

Spring doesn't spawn the threads. Tomcat does. Spring is just creating and wiring up the objects for you. Each request from the browser is processed in one request. It is Tomcat that handles the request. It is Tomcat that creates the thread to process the request. Assuming you have just created a singleton bean in Spring called "X". Then the same instance ...


11

The reason this is flagged as a problem is because synchronizing on local variables is usually a bad idea. If the object returned by someGlobalInstance.getMap() is always the same, then the synchronized block does in fact use that quasi-global objects monitor and the code produces the expected result. I also agree with the suggestion to use a synchronized ...



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