Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

7

The standard allows for this behavior, although it doesn't guarantee it. From 3.7.2/2 [basic.stc.thread]: A variable with thread storage duration shall be initialized before its first odr-use (3.2) and, if constructed, shall be destroyed on thread exit. It's also possible that the objects are constructed at some other time (e.g. on program ...


6

ThreadStatic Initialize only on first thread, ThreadLocal Initialize for each thread. Below is the simple demonstration: public static ThreadLocal<int> _threadlocal = new ThreadLocal<int>(() => { return Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId; }); public static void Main() { new Thread(() ...


4

Actually, there is a pool of threads serving the requests. The threads get reused for different requests. This is why it is of key importance to unconditionally clear the ThreadLocal when the processing of one request finishes. You should do it using the idiom try {} finally { threadLocal.clear(); }


4

There is no way to pair user-level context switches with TLS. Even with atomics and full memory fence, caching address seems legitimate optimization since the thread_local variable is file-scope, static variable which cannot be moved as assumed by the compiler. (though, perhaps some compilers can still be sensitive to the compiler memory barriers like ...


3

Global variables, and more generally namespace-scope variables, automatically have static storage duration when not declared with a storage class specifier. At namespace scope, static does not mean "static storage duration"; it means the variable has internal linkage. Hence int x; static int x; at namespace scope both declare x with static storage ...


3

If your situation is that single thread will have to format the date only once, then there's no point going with ThreadLocal, you can simple create new object every time. Since the object is creating nevertheless of the situation, in this case using ThreadLocal will be costly and might have memory issue. My suggestion -> go for new Object creation. I think ...


3

The Spring solution will cost more but will make for cleaner code IMO. There are a lot of steps involved in fetching, creating, initializing, and storing a bean. However you won't have to think about clearing the request scoped bean as you would the ThreadLocal. It will be collected when the corresponding ServletRequest is cleaned up.


3

Most executors can be constructed with a ThreadFactory. That's also true for ForkJoinPool. However, for simplification, I use a different ExecutorService. ExecutorService executor = Executors.newFixedThreadPool( 10, new FinalizerThreadFactory(Executors.defaultThreadFactory())); The class FinalizerThreadFactory delegates the creation of threads to the ...


2

ThreadLocal is different. SingleTon is different. ThreadLocal Even singleton object has different thread local in different thread. For ex, A is a singleton reference. A can be shared in multiple threads. So each thread has thread specific thread local value. Singleton Only one object exists in JVM at a time.


2

It seems like you're making this much harder than it has to be. Consider this: public class MyClass: IDisposable { private Stream _foo; public MyClass Get() { if (_foo == null) { _foo = new MemoryStream(); } } public void Foo() { _foo.WriteByte(1); } public void Dispose() { ...


2

The accepted answer to this question, and the "severe" logs from Tomcat about this issue are misleading. The key quote there is: By definition, a reference to a ThreadLocal value is kept until the "owning" thread dies or if the ThreadLocal itself is no longer reachable. [My emphasis]. In this case the only references to the ThreadLocal are in the ...


2

If we consider the traditional Java approach the answer can be deducted from the quote bellow as being much slower: Because reflection involves types that are dynamically resolved, certain Java virtual machine optimizations can not be performed. Consequently, reflective operations have slower performance than their non-reflective counterparts, and ...


2

Christian from Realm here. It is a good strategy, and luckily we already implemented it for you :) All Realm instances are already being cached in a ThreadLocal and we keep track of instances using a counter. The Realm is only fully closed once the counter reaches 0. This means as long as you always calls close() (which you should), it is effectively the ...


2

This is a classic problem related to ThreadLocal. Thread local variables being global thread-local variables (Confined and belongs to the thread), they must not be used with a Thread Pool which retains Threads even after their task is over. This will eventually result in PermGen memory issues. Since you can not change the ThreadLocals in the third party ...


2

Now you're returning a new ThreadLocal every time getMoneyFormatter is being called. You should initialize it once only. However, using ThreadLocal can result in resource leaks, so unless you really know you'll need it, it would be simpler to just create a new formatter when you need it.


2

You are observing the behavior which is the whole point of the ThreadLocal: what you set in one thread is not visible from another. You must set the ThreadLocal values from within the thread where you use them.


2

ThreadLocal.remove() is indeed removing a reference to the value... and if there is no more other living reference to it : the value will be soon garbage collected. When the thread died, the thread is removed form the GC-root... therefore the entry for the thread in the ThreadLocal is subject to GC... therefore the value for this entry in the ThreadLocal is ...


2

synchronized(request.getAttribute("foo")) is bad, because there can be no foo in request and you'll get NPE. Better use some dedicated lock object. Regarding ThreadLocal usage -- it's fine if not overused. For code of size you posted it's ok, but I think real issue is in your real code-base and it's pretty impossible to give short helpful advice here except ...


1

I compiled int regular_global_int; __thread int static_thread_local_int; int main() { regular_global_int = 1; static_thread_local_int = 1; } at http://ellcc.org/blog/?page_id=340 I had to take off the static to keep the optimizer from getting rid of the static variable. I got main: # @main # BB#0: ...


1

If its any help I use a custom SPI (an interface) and the JDK ServiceLoader. Then all of my various internal libraries (jars) that need to do unloading of threadlocals just follow the ServiceLoader pattern. So if a jar needs threadlocal cleanup it will automatically get picked if it has the appropriate /META-INF/services/interface.name. Then I do the ...


1

If that instance is used exclusively with ThreadLocal and not passed around, there doesn't appear to be much point in volatile. Note, however, that MyClass is just a class like any other: there's nothing preventing it from being used in contexts not involving thread-local storage. In those contexts it could well make sense for the variable to be volatile.


1

This is because you need to override the initialValue() method for the ThreadLocal class. E.g. /** Thread local logger. */ private static final ThreadLocal<Logger> LOGGER = new ThreadLocal<Logger> () { @Override protected Logger initialValue() { return LoggerFactory.getLogger(ThisClass.class); } };


1

I think you are going down a needlessly complicated path. Since the supply-test-supply-test-supply-test sequence is sequential, initial supplyAsync is all you need. There's no reason to do async within async. Here's a simple implementation: public static <T> CompletableFuture<T> repeat(final Supplier<T> action, final ...


1

A thread local cached copy is fine as it is simpler and more efficient. A cached copy where you are not sure it is thread local could be a problem. A singleton by definition means there can only be one. I wouldn't what you have as a singleton and you have one per thread. I would init() your thread local object in it's constructor. BTW Your ThreadLocal ...


1

The ActionContext is ThreadLocal and it doesn't have a request object when you run a background thread via execAndWait interceptor. If you use SessionAware, then you should have servletConfig interceptor on the stack to be able to set the session object to your action before the action is executed. Solution: if you can get ServletRequestAware to set a ...


1

There's no reason to call clearCache(). Once the thread exits or the thread_specific_ptr goes out of scope, the cleanup function will be invoked. If you don't pass a cleanup function to the thread_specific_ptr's constructor, it will just use delete.


1

Each thread that accesses the variable of singleton class object (via its get or set method) has its own, independently initialized copy of that variable, it woun't be shared and that is the character of ThreadLocal variable. Documentation


1

Yes, each call will be received by different (thread local) objects.


1

Using ThreadLocal to store request scoped information has the potential to break if you use Servlet 3.0 Suspendable requests (or Jetty Continuations) Using those API's multiple threads process a single request.


1

This looks like you are using the same Timer object in more than one thread. You should move the new Timer() into initialValue(). Only then you can be sure to have a unique Timer object per thread. And guessing from your code, config is immutable so you can pass this into the timer. You then only create one MonMetrics and reuse it in all threads.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible