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67

Sleep(1) is a documented way in Windows to yield the processor and allow other threads to run. You can find this code in the Reference Source with comments: // Our memory model guarantee if we pick up the change in bucket from another processor, // we will see the 'isWriterProgress' flag to be true or 'version' is changed in the reader. // int ...


27

The call to Thread.Sleep is blocking the UI thread. You need to wait asynchronously. Method 1: use a DispatcherTimer tbkLabel.Text = "two mins delay"; var timer = new DispatcherTimer { Interval = TimeSpan.FromSeconds(2) }; timer.Start(); timer.Tick += (sender, args) => { timer.Stop(); var page = new Page2(); page.Show(); ...


24

You call Thread.sleep(10000); It always makes the current thread sleep. Even if you did: Thread t = new Thread(...); t.start(); t.sleep(10000); That would still make the current thread sleep for 10 seconds, while leaving the new thread to go on its merry way. This is almost the canonical example for why this warning is important - it's because you're ...


19

Well, if you want the UI to remain responsive you can't block the UI thread with Thread.sleep there. Create a new thread, then sleep it. After the sleep, run the method for changing the view drawable on the UI thread new Thread(new Runnable() { @Override public void run() { try { Thread.sleep(5000); } catch ...


13

This is by design. You are seeing the threadpool manager trying to keep a limited number of threads in the executing state. Important to ensure that your program isn't running more threads than your machine has cpu cores. That's inefficient, less work gets done when Windows is forced to start swapping the cores between active threads. The threadpool ...


13

If you need to sleep within a Runnable, you can simply call Thread.sleep(); inside the run method. To access the thread that is running the Runnable, you can call Thread.currentThread(), but that is not necessary to call the sleep method, which is static.


13

Can someone help me understand how the Thread.sleep() function is implemented? It calls sleep on the underlying native thread provided by the operating system. Sleep is said to have no effect on the CPU consumption. A thread that is not running does not consume CPU time. Is the current thread added to a list of listeners? No. When will ...


12

Thread.Sleep takes a value in milliseconds, not seconds, so this only tells the current thread to wait 3.6 seconds. If you want to wait 10 minutes, use: Thread.Sleep(1000 * 60 * 10); // 600,000 ms = 600 sec = 10 min This is probably an inappropriate use of Sleep, though. Consider using a Timer instead, so that you get something along the lines of: // ...


12

So I was wondering when it will release the lock. It will release the lock upon exit from the synchronized block, and not earlier. If the thread, put on sleep, never gets the chance to run so it will always keep the lock with itself and then how other threads get to enter synchronized methods/block. Quite simply, other threads will not be able to ...


12

The classical Unix solution for this is to use select() with no file descriptors: let minisleep (sec: float) = ignore (Unix.select [] [] [] sec)


12

The granularity of sleeps is generally bound by the thread scheduler's interrupt period. In Linux, this interrupt period is generally 1ms in recent kernels. In Windows, the scheduler's interrupt period is normally around 10 or 15 milliseconds If I have to halt threads for periods less than this, I normally use a busy wait EDIT: I suspect you'll get best ...


12

Can anyone tell me why sleeping one thread is stopping my whole execution to better explain your Swing GUI is created on its own special thread separate from that which main() and other code will run in, this is done via creating your Swing components in the SwingUtilities.invokeXXX block (even if you have not done this your GUI will be run on a ...


12

(The answer from Blackhex raised some interesting points, but I can't cram all this into a comment.) Having two threads operating asynchronously is bound to lead to issues like this. Look at it this way: the event that drives animation is the hardware "vsync" signal, i.e. the point at which the Android surface compositor provides a new screen full of data ...


12

Look at Thread thread = new Thread(this); thread.start(); b1 = new Ball(40, 40); b2 = new Ball(70, 200); You are initializing your variables after your thread starts. Sometimes the thread uses them before they are actually initialized, sometimes they get initialized first. Move them before the start() call: b1 = new Ball(40, 40); b2 = new Ball(70, ...


12

First of all, do you really need a wait loop? You can typically solve your problems using proper notifications, i.e. having an Object, calling wait() and notify() on it or other means (like a blocking queue, or Semaphore.acquire() in your case). That said, if you really want a polling loop (which you really shouldn't do unless you have to), I'd stick with ...


11

Don't use Thread.Sleep for this type of thing. Use a Timer and calculate the duration you need to wait. var now = DateTime.Now; var tomorrow = now.AddDays(1); var durationUntilMidnight = tomorrow.Date - now; var t = new Timer(o=>{/* Do work*/}, null, TimeSpan.Zero, durationUntilMidnight); Replace the /* Do Work */ delegate with the callback that will ...


10

[lots of nonsense about calling sleep() in UI thread]. If i get it right, you mean having something like: //...inside onTick() try { tv2.setText("almost waking up"); // first setText() Thread.sleep(4000); tv2.setText("waking up"); // second seText() } If you make your main thread sleep, it will just stop processing anything: the current ...


10

If you use Object.wait instead of Thread.sleep, the lock from the synchronized block will be released.


10

The Thread.delay function pauses the thread for the given number of seconds, but it takes a float, allowing you to pause the thread for less than a second.


10

When you use Thread.sleep() you're doing it on the main thread. This freezes the gui for five seconds then it updates the outputField. When that happens, it uses the last set text which is blank. It's much better to use Swing Timers and here's an example that does what you're trying to accomplish: if (match) { // Another class calculates } else { ...


10

try this: public void check(){ isDataAvailable = GetInternetAvailibility() if(!isDataAvailable){ disableInternet(); enableInternet(); if(retry>0){ retry--; new Handler().postDelayed(new Runnable() { @Override public void run() { check(); } }, 10000); } } } ...


10

Thread.sleep(1000); will block the current running thread paintComponent is called from within the context of the Event Dispatching Thread. Swing won't update the state of the UI until it's finished processing the current (in this case "paint") event, meaning that while it's blocked at Thread.sleep, nothing will be updated on the UI and no new events will ...


9

My guess is that you're doing something like: DataSyncThread thread = new DataSyncThread(); thread.run(); That will run the run() method synchronously. You should be calling start() to create a separate thread of execution: DataSyncThread thread = new DataSyncThread(); thread.start(); I would also recommend implementing Runnable instead of extending ...


9

Thread.sleep() is not a problem for sure. It does not create any threads or such. I can only guess that isRunning is never set (or the change is not visible due to poor synchronization) and new threads are created while old ones are still running. BTW instead of constantly calling available and sleeping the thread can simply block on input.read(). Code ...


9

You should start AsyncTask with a Handler created on main thread. So replace your run() method in IceCastPoll with this one: private Handler handler = new Handler(Looper.getMainLooper()); @Override public void run() { handler.post(new Runnable() { public void run() { new AsyncTaskProc().execute(); } }); }


9

The WaitHandle type and derived types provide an event-driven mechanism for waiting that ties into the operating system. For example, when you have a Task<T> task and you wait on the result by accessing task.Result, the internal implementation isn't polling with Thread.Sleep calls in between. It's using a WaitHandle-derived type to do waiting and ...


9

you are invoking sleep() on main thread, sleep() is static method you are just using its Thread's instance (creed) to call it which is discouraged, It sleeps the Thread in which this method is being called if you want to pause creed thread then you need to execute Thread.sleep() from its run() method


9

Here's your problem: Thread thread = new Thread(this); thread.start(); b1 = new Ball(40, 40); b2 = new Ball(70, 200); You need to set b1 and b2 before calling thread.start() -- the call to start calls your run method in a new thread, and there's a chance the run method could be called before these variables are itinitialized, leading to your ...


9

As Philip Whitehouse states in his answer, you are blocking the swing Event Dispatch Thread with the Thread.sleep(...) call. Given that you've taken the time to set up an ActionListener already, it would probably be easiest to use a javax.swing.Timer to control clearing the text. To do this, you could add a field to your GUI class: private Timer ...


8

When you sleep inside the event dispatch thread (EDT), the GUI is frozen. Every long running task should be done outside of the EDT, and all swing manipulations should be done in the EDT. You should use a SwingWorker to sleep in another thread, and publish some progress every 500ms. Or you could use a javax.swing.Timer which would fire an event every ...



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