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0

It is used to cancel the periodic task after 1 hour


0

One way is to to have the Client return itself (in the Future) when done. Just need a list and then use the afterExecute method. Like this: pool =new ThreadPoolExecutor(...) { @Override protected void afterExecute(Runnable r, Throwable t) { // The future returns the Client object! client = (Client)((FutureTask)r).get(); // ...


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Call shutdownInput() on all the client sockets. That will cause the associated threads to think that the peer has disconnected and so exit gracefully.


1

Store all the sockets in a List before submitting them to the pool. Then the shutdown thread can call close() on all the sockets, which should cause the blocked threads to throw SocketExceptions.


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Reusing the Runnables makes no sense as the problem is not the cost of creating or freeing the runnable instances. These come almost for free in Java. What you want to do is to limit the number of pending jobs which is easy to achieve: just provide a limit to the queue you are passing to the executor service. That’s as easy as passing an int value (the ...


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You'll want to use something like this: ArrayBlockingQueue<Runnable> queue = new ArrayBlockingQueue<Runnable>(MAX_PENDING_TASKS); Executor executor = new ThreadPoolExecutor(MIN_THREADS, MAX_THREADS, IDLE_TIMEOUT, TimeUnit.SECONDS, queue, new ThreadPoolExecutor.CallerRunsPolicy()); for(int i=0; i<10000000000; i++) { executor.submit(new ...


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Why don't you set a limit to how many tasks can run concurrently. Like: HashSet<Future> futures = new HashSet<>(); int concurrentTasks = 1000; for (int ii=0; ii<100000000; ii++) { while(concurrentTasks-- > 0 && ii<100000000) { concurrentTasks.add(executor.submit(new Task(ii))); } Iterator<Future> it = ...


-1

You should use java.lang.Runtime The biggest memory issue is probably going to be your Object creation, not in adding them to your Executor, so that's where you should be calling Runtime.getRuntime().freeMemory().


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Assuming that you are using the java.util.concurrent.Executors.newFixedThreadPool() method, the limit is Integer.MAX_INT, at least in the OpenJDK implementation. The OpenJDK 8 implementation of this method creates a new LinkedBlockingQueue, which defaults to a max size of Integer.MAX_INT. Thus, the maximum number of Runnables in the default fixed thread ...


4

Maximum number of Runnable's that can be added to the Queue in fixed/cached Thread Pool is decided by the memory allocated to the JVM. Once all of the memory is consumed, JVM will throw Exception in thread "main" java.lang.OutOfMemoryError: unable to create new native thread error message.


5

I assume that the 'massiveData' is always copied for each thread (right?) If this is true ... Nope, false. Only the reference to massiveData is copied. Java doesn't do magic copies of non-primitive types. If you want to copy something you have to do it explicitly. If you didn't already know that, I'm guessing you're going to run into all sorts of ...


0

In a w3wp.exe instance hosting one WCF service, there exist at least 3 AppDomains in .NET 4, one is called SharedAppDomains which include over 20 .net framework assemblies, and the other called Default, and the last one is named something like /LM/W3Svc.... some funky name, which contains your WCF application assemblies as well as some direct dependencies. ...


0

Assuming that you're using embedded Tomcat, Spring Boot uses the server.tomcat.max-threads property to control the size of the client request thread pool. Its default value is zero which leaves Tomcat to use its default of 200. To customise the size of this thread pool you should specify a non-zero value for the server.tomcat.max-threads property in your ...


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In your case it's easy to get this exception. ThreadPoolExecutor New tasks submitted in method execute(Runnable) will be rejected when the Executor has been shut down, and also when the Executor uses finite bounds for both maximum threads and work queue capacity, and is saturated. Task rejection lead to generation of RejectedExecutionException. In your ...


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Okay, so here is what I came up with using a combination of the information from everyone contributing to this question -- all excellent and VERY helpful answers, which helped lead me to the final solution. Ideally, I would like this as a straight "class", but I can accept a UserControl for this purpose. If someone can take this and do exactly the same ...


2

If you want to ensure that an object that has no direct knowledge of your UI raises its events on the UI thread then use the SynchronizationContext class, e.g. Public Class SomeClass Private threadingContext As SynchronizationContext = SynchronizationContext.Current Public Event SomethingHappened As EventHandler Protected Overridable Sub ...


1

Does this solve your issue? Private Sub t_UnzipComplete(ZipInfo As Tools.ZipInfo) Handles t.UnzipComplete If TextBox1.InvokeRequired Then TextBox1.Invoke(Sub () t_UnzipComplete(ZipInfo)) Else TextBox1.Text = TextBox1.Text & ZipInfo.ZipFile & vbCr End If End Sub You could create a callback to do the invoking in a safer ...


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You should register from the Form to events of the Tools class (you already have these events defined), of course the actual event will be fired under a non-UI thread, so the code it executes during the callback will only be able to update the UI via an Invoke() You want to simply raise the event in the Tools class, the Invoke needs to be done because you ...


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Here's how you can do the synchronization you're looking for without using a pool: import multiprocessing def function(arg): print ("got arg %s" % arg) if __name__ == "__main__": number_of_cpus = 5 number_of_iterations = 2 # An array for the processes. processing_jobs = [] # Start 5 processes 2 times. for iteration in ...


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A Pool can be very easy to use. Here's a full example: source import multiprocessing def calc(num): return num*2 if __name__=='__main__': # required for Windows pool = multiprocessing.Pool() # one Process per CPU for output in pool.map(calc, [1,2,3]): print 'output:',output output output: 2 output: 4 output: 6


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The low application throughput itself cannot explain the thread creation and destruction. The socket receives 20 messages per seconds, which is more than enough to keep a thread alive (the waiting threads are being destroyed after spending 10 seconds idle). This problem is related to the thread pool thread injection, i.e. the threads creation and ...


0

You face the “java.lang.OutOfMemoryError: Unable to create new native thread” whenever JVM is asking a new thread from the OS. Whenever the underlying OS cannot allocate a new native thread, this OutOfMemoryError will be thrown. The exact limit for native threads is very platform-dependent thus we recommend to find your limits by running a small test to find ...


0

simply surround worker.ProcessOnce(); with a try catch block and make sure it's not throwing any exceptions. if you find that's not the case, i am really suspecting that your logging system is crashing Log.Instance.Info. double check your logging class code and consider using locking in order to avoid simultaneous access to the same variable from multiple ...


0

You're getting resets and timeouts so it seems that the web server is not listening for incoming connections. Since you wrote that you "started" getting this, I'm assuming that you received responses for at least some requests, so the web server was up and was accessible. It might be some DoS protection that blocks clients that attempt to establish too many ...


0

You need to check what is the connections per host value which you have given while setting up connection (looking at the exception I think you would have set it to 500). MongoClientOptions.Builder builder = new MongoClientOptions.Builder(); builder.connectionsPerHost(200); MongoClientOptions options = builder.build(); mongoClient = new MongoClient(URI, ...


3

The real problem is that you are trying to create too many threads using too much stack memory. You could reduce the default size for the thread stacks (as suggested), but that isn't a complete solution. (When you decide to run your program on more URLs, you will run into the same problem again. And eventually you will hit "the wall" where you can't ...


0

Using invokeAll also you can achieve. List<Future<byte[]>> results = exec.invokeAll(callables); It will return the future object list. ThreadPoll will execute the tasks in random order . Task execution order cannnot be controlled. Future Object Its a reference of task which is submitted in ThreadPool. It has a method get(). Its a ...


0

SELECT * FROM Mails WHERE Unsibscribed=0 LIMIT 0,1000 SELECT * FROM Mails WHERE Unsibscribed=0 LIMIT 1000,1000 ... see http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/select.html especially LIMIT clause. also http://php.about.com/od/mysqlcommands/g/Limit_sql.htm


2

Look at your loop: for(int year = 11; year <= 13; year++){ for(int i = 1; i <= 350; i++){ //generating 1050 URLs at one shot StringBuffer regNo = new StringBuffer("1111").append(year).append("111").append(String.format("%03d", i)); String url = "magicUrl" + regNo; System.out.println(url); ...


1

From MSDN Beginning with the .NET Framework 4, the thread pool creates and destroys worker threads in order to optimize throughput, which is defined as the number of tasks that complete per unit of time. Too few threads might not make optimal use of available resources, whereas too many threads could increase resource contention. Note ...


0

The difference might be described as follows (with some simplification): in "thread driven" runtimes, when request comes in, a new thread is being created and all the handling is being done in that thread. in "event driven" runtimes, when request comes in, the event is dispatched and handler will pick it up. When? In Node.js there is a "event loop", which ...


1

That whole stack trace part below BaseWork is simply the Task delegate being queued to the ThreadPool. If you simply wrote Log.Instance.Info(new StackTrace().ToString()), you would have gotten a bit more verbose listing, something like: // this is the anonymous handler delegate where you print the stack trace <BaseWork>b__3(System.Object, ...


2

You're hitting a thread-safety issue in the datetime library, according to this link. Last Friday, I met a Python Bug, so this weekend I spent some time to investigate this bug and wrote this post to explain the root cause. I’m not a Python specialist, a C programmer, instead. If you found anything error please correct me. I extracted the ...


0

The sentence you are afraid of: The threads in the pool will exist until it is explicitly shutdown describes only calls to Executors.newFixedThreadPool(). To keep more control on the thread pool behavior, use ThreadPoolExecutor constructor expicitly, e.g new ThreadPoolExecutor(1, //minimal Pool Size, 10, // maximal Pool Size, ...


0

There is no difference between the threads except for the pool they were/are in as you can read here: Simple description of worker and I/O threads in .NET A thread has no knowledge about the pool that it came from. So this is not possible.


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When using the .NET ThreadPool there is some guarantee that actions performed in a thread prior using the ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem method happen-before its execution begins? Yes. Like Hans already said any action that would cause code to execute in another thread will create a memory barrier on the initiator such that writes are committed and on ...


0

The ExecutorService is the way to go. It provides you an interface (Future) to the state of the underlying thread, the ability to detect exceptions and return a value from the completed thread. Here is a simple example of how to use ExecutorSerivce and the Future interface. public class Updater implements Future< boolean > { public Updater() { ...


1

Here you need to understand the difference between Thread and the Runnable/Callable Task. so the meaning of The threads in the pool will exist until it is explicitly shutdown. is that at any point of time there will be 5 threads in the thread pool if you use Executors.newFixedThreadPool(5); . And the work that you want these threads to do would be submitted ...


1

Use the ScheduledExecutorService with a fixed pool of threads for however many connections you need. Have a BlockingQueue that you put requests in, the worker threads wait on the queue and process the requests as they appear.


1

The threads will stay there (waiting for other tasks to run), but it won't hold on to all the data that you put there. When the thread in the threadpool has executed the task, it will take a next task and won't reference the existing task anymore. So your fears are baseless, unless you explicitly keep references to the tasks.


0

There's something fishy in there. When does initClock ends? Looks like never, or more like it when you exit the application. So, if you're starting many thread pool threads with the entry point initClock then that's why you run out of thread pool capacity. In this case it doesn't matter how much you increase the min threads, it will still behave like this. ...


1

Are you starting many of those tasks, each of which block for a long time? According to the information given this might be the case. This means that a lot of threads can be active at at a time. When you use the thread-pool above the minimum limits starting an additional thread will be throttled for (I believe) 500ms. This might be the delay you are seeing. ...


0

From my comments: I can't imagine a tiny request every 5 seconds causing much of an issue, if your site is designed to handle your normal page traffic already. With only 50 users, there should be no chance at all of any resource problems, if you have any kind of halfway-decent hardware and network. You should be fine with 100 times that much traffic.


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If you're going to make myadd an instance method of the test class, you have to actually instantiate the test class to call myadd: from multiprocessing.pool import ThreadPool class test(): def myadd(self,x): return(x+2) t = ThreadPool(5) test_obj = test() # This gives you an instance of the `test` class t.map(test_obj.my_add, range(1,100)) # ...


0

You cannot have abstract methods in non abstract class! So having a abstract method in Thread would have to make Thread class abstract as well. Then why stop there? Make it an interface. But wait.. we already have Runnable interface that Thread class implements. Also note we call start() method and not the run() method. start() will start a new Thread of ...


3

You have almost answered your own question. Here is the default implementation of run public void run() { if (target != null) { target.run(); } } That is, the default implementation invokes the Runnable that was passed in via the constructor. Which is the first approach that you mentioned in your question. new Thread( runnable ...


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If Thread#run() was abstract, then following would be a compile error: Thread t = new Thread(myRunnable);


0

Regarding to my other question here: Using HttpContext.Current in WebApi is dangerous because of async now I know it is safe to store the data in HttpContext.Current so it works now as desired..



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