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Together with MeshDepthMaterial and the logarithmicDepthBuffer flag, I can get pretty nice looking depth map with the weird camera setup. var renderer = new THREE.WebGLRenderer({logarithmicDepthBuffer: true });


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I guess reading the documentation should help you understand the difference. From the documentation: .getElapsedTime () Get the seconds passed since the clock started. .getDelta () Get the seconds passed since the last call to this method http://threejs.org/docs/#Reference/Core/Clock.getElapsedTime


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To do collision detection between meshes, all the meshes must be known to physi.js. In other words, you must use one of the physi.js shapes. So you need a physi.js mesh for your Player so he doesn't fall through the floor. This doesn't have to be the same mesh that is visible to the user. You can have an invisible mesh that follows the player around and ...


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Solution: Don't use Internet Explorer, i run the same code in Firefox and it works.


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Solution: If you use a mouse-controlled camera with three.js, you have to comment the following line in the MouseListener of the mouseDown action: event.preventDefault();


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I'm currently solving this by refreshing every mesh in the scene as follows: mesh.geometry = mesh.geometry.clone(); mesh.material = mesh.material.clone(); newMesh = mesh.clone();


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You could create an opaque plane that is perpendicular to the camera. Then anything behind it will be hidden. Based on this other SO post, you could use the myPlane.lookAt() function to look at the camera's position and thereby make it perpendicular to the camera.


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If you make a boundingBox (THREE.Box3) for both the 'robot' and the 'home' you can use the containsBox method. So something like this: var robotBB = new THREE.Box3().setFromObject(robot); var homeBB = new THREE.Box3().setFromObject(home) where home and robot are of course your objects. var robotIsHome = homeBB.containsBox(robotBB); robotIsHome will be ...


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I am not sure if this outline effect is what you are looking for, but it is a nice way to put a border around your objects: Here a similar question where you find more examples and a working fiddle to fool around with. It uses some WebGL native shader effect if I am not mistaken it is this part: vertex_shader: [ "uniform float offset;", "void ...


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If you're not changing the number of faces, you can use morph targets http://threejs.org/examples/webgl_morphtargets.html You should Create your geometry Clone the geometry and make your modifications to it, such as the maximum length of your geometry pillar Set both geometries as morph targets to your base geometry, for example ...


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Line 171 would have been for the vertices array. Did you not check the Vertices option when exporting? Did you possibly export a Scene and not a Geometry format?


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You are using MeshPhongMaterial. What you are seeing is the specular highlight only. Your light is blue. However, your material is green, so it reflects only green light. Therefore, there is no diffuse light reflected from the material. The material specular reflectance is, by default, 0x111111. So all colors are reflected specularly. Since your light is ...


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No, you'll need two different canvases. One possibility would be render the pixi's canvas to a texture and map it onto a 3d shape (in three.js canvas) but it looks neither easy nor useful. I would rather suggest you to use CCS3 transformations in order to apply 3D transforms to your pixi's canvas. May I ask you what are you trying to achieve?


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as answered here: http://gamedev.stackexchange.com/questions/93031/three-js-lighting-not-calculating-correctly-on-three-geometry-objects/93099#93099 The triangle winding needs to be counter-clockwise as seen from the outside of the object. To confirm, change all instances of THREE.DoubleSide to THREE.FrontSide and run. THREE.FrontSide should look perfect ...


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var clock = new THREE.Clock(); var trackballControls; function render() { stats.update(); var delta = clock.getDelta(); trackballControls.update(delta); // render using requestAnimationFrame requestAnimationFrame(render); webGLRenderer.render(scene, camera); } function trackBall(){ ...


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Did you try working with the Frame step option at all? Right now the exporters (both r69 and r70) will step through each frame. This option allows you to dial up the number of frames to step through in the timeline allowing the export to skip an X amount of frames.


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The call to THREE.SceneUtils.createMultiMaterialObject() (to create your polyhedron) returns a THREE.Object3D where the call to THREE.Mesh() (to create your sphere and cube) returns a THREE.Mesh. So they are different entities but you treat them the same. If instead you call: polyhedron = new THREE.Mesh( geometry, new THREE.MeshBasicMaterial( { color: ...


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You need to choose a file format that allows to specify color per triangle-set, not only per mesh. To my knowledge this works with vrml, which can be exported by FreeCAD. Annother idea would be to split your part into multiple ones and export every color region as single mesh with on color.


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Check these examples, they will help you working with particle/point clouds: webgl_interactive_particles and webgl_interactive_raycasting_pointcloud. With intersects[0].index you can find the index of the point you intersected. So you can use this index to find your point: var index = intersects[0].index; var point = particles.geometry.vertices[ index ]; ...


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Be careful grouping objects under a Null (empty) in Blender. I tried this awhile ago with my light setups as its normally a logical work flow but found that there were transformation issues when the scene was constructed in three. When I export in three.js, only the last selected object in Blender will be exported as a .json file. The key word here is ...


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The point cloud material attribute I was missing was depthWrite:false and as @WestLangley correctly said, depthTest: true; I don't know how to version the embedded code so I updated it to work with these values.


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OH! It was all the texture filtering, this entire time. I needed to change my generatePickingTexture function to: function generatePickingTexture(w, h){ var canvas = document.createElement("canvas"); canvas.width = w; canvas.height = h; var texture = new THREE.Texture(canvas, THREE.UVMapping, THREE.RepeatWrapping, THREE.RepeatWrapping, ...


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EDIT: I have found 2 major things you have to improve: Planes updates with GPU speedup: high Lets pick your code from plane.js timer += dT; if(timer > 0.1) { var x = 2 + Math.floor(Math.random() * (this.mapSize - 4)); var y = 2 + Math.floor(Math.random() * (this.mapSize - 4)); //accmap[x][y] += 30000 * ...


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It is not the light that is going through the box but the shadow. Try playing with the shadow bias. In your case adding: spotLight.shadowBias = 0.001; takes care of the artifact.


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I think your mistake is in the fact that you make a texture of a texture. When you do: dummyDataTex = new THREE.DataTexture( dummyRGBA, 4, 4, THREE.RGBAFormat ); the object dummyDataTex that you create here is already of type THREE.Texture. So your next step: dummyTex = new THREE.Texture(dummyDataTex); is not necessary. You should instead immediately ...


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issue is that the texture we are trying to display is not valid. New thread create about this specific issue: generate texture from array in threejs


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Basically you need to do tween.update(time) for each requested animation frame. I hvae modified an example from threejs.org to demonstrate this: http://jsfiddle.net/up1wg1Lo/2/ Note that I add parameter to animte and render so that they can know the tick. Also note the usage of tween.update(time) on line 143


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The Final answer to my problem was I did not have the "Materials" check box selected in the Three_js The export options, not the materials options. repsac is the one that helped me, I dont know how to vote for him, or highlight his comment above with the link as being the correct answer. This is my first time here, so I am trying to define the answer that ...


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Can't recreate this. The pastebin is only a partial JSON and not too useful in this context. The exporter creates a log in your $TMPDIR. A shell window prints the log path Log: /var/folders/0s/d7365qbn5gv76sj266_9qqs00000gn/T/io_three.export.log That is a bit more informative and without the actual scene the log is possibly the only thing that may help (if ...


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I can only respond for Babylon.js Actually for question 1, I can respond for both:) they are javascript 3d engines that need WebGL to run hardware accelerated rendering (Three.js can run with pure software rendering as well but do not except to render anything else but a cube). So they can be used for web pages and web apps (ala Cordova or with Cocoon.js) ...


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Seems like a non-power-of-two problem. Make sure your texture file has power of two sides (in pixels).


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You need to update the Matrices for the objects not in the render scene manually as its done as part of the render process so if you are using your ghost scene, you don't need to render it, just update the matrices before doing the intersection: scene_ghost.updateMatrixWorld(true);


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Why not use http://threejs.org/docs/#Reference/Extras.Geometries/PolyhedronGeometry var verticesOfCube = [ -1,-1,-1, 1,-1,-1, 1, 1,-1, -1, 1,-1, -1,-1, 1, 1,-1, 1, 1, 1, 1, -1, 1, 1, ]; var indicesOfFaces = [ 2,1,0, 0,3,2, 0,4,7, 7,3,0, 0,1,5, 5,4,0, 1,2,6, 6,5,1, 2,3,7, 7,6,2, 4,5,6, ...


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See Transparent background with three.js for transparent background rendering and then you can apply CSS gradients http://www.w3schools.com/Css/css3_gradients.asp however it won't move with your scene unless you get really tricky.


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Raycaster's intersect object takes an Object3D with children, and has a flag for recursion. https://github.com/mrdoob/three.js/blob/master/src/core/Raycaster.js#L33 So it should look like this: var intersections = raycaster.intersectObjects( yourRootObject3D, true );


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You might have moved container out by accident container = document.body.appendChild( container ); container.appendChild( this.renderer.domElement ); Will cause the container to be on body, which will show up at the bottom. @Vinay had the right answer, you can give the renderer constructor a canvas so you can make your own canvas in the container, then ...


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In your code // rotation (using slerp) (function () { var qa = camera.quaternion; // src quaternion Change it to qa = new THREE.Quaternion().copy(camera.quaternion); // src quaternion The way you do it, qa is the same as the camera quaternion, and it feeds back in the slerp calculus. It must be a constant variable.


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Do you mean smooth faces? The way to make your edges 'hard' is to first add this to your material options: shading: THREE.FlatShading, And then possibly: geometry.computeVertexNormals()


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THREE doesn't offer much in terms of 2D shapes so you have to get the arc somehow. If you don't need to generate it procedurally, you can draw the arc in illustrator as an enclosed shape, save it out as an SVG, use TWO.js (https://jonobr1.github.io/two.js/) to convert it into points, and then you can extract the points into THREE.js. Another way is to ...


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Check out https://github.com/mrdoob/three.js/wiki/Uniforms-types for arrays, such as: "uFloatArray3" : { type: "fv", value: [ 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5, 0.6 ] }, // float array (vec3) or "uVec4Array" : { type: "v4v", value: [ new THREE.Vector4( 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4 ), new THREE.Vector4( 0.4, 0.5, 0.6, 0.7 ) ] }, // ...


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I figured it out! You must update the matrix before merging Geometry plane.updateMatrix(); mapGeo.merge(plane.geometry, plane.matrix);


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That won't work because the matrix for your target is not in the same place, and can be scaled differently and all sorts of stuff. A better technique is to raycast from your eye object, and see if it hits the target object. http://threejs.org/examples/#webgl_geometry_terrain_raycast var raycaster = new THREE.Raycaster(); raycaster.setFromCamera( mouse, ...


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Open up terminal, navigate to your folder where index.html lives, then type in (for python 26) python -m SimpleHTTPServer (for python 3) python -m http.server Now navigate to localhost:8000 in your browser. The reason for this is because you need to host a web server for the browser to fetch files, such as textures, shaders, etc, using ajax.


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Usually 360 panoramic images are loaded in as cube-maps, so something like http://www.humus.name/Textures/SaintPetersSquare1.jpg You can split the cubemap up into many images, as is done in most THREE.js examples (okay stackoverflow is being a bitch at me since I'm new and can't post more than one link) http:// threejs.org / ...


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Try checking out how Jerome Etienne did his ObjCoord library to get an idea: https://github.com/jeromeetienne/threex.objcoord It's a bit outdated however: /** * get the world position * @return {THREE.Vector3} the world position */ THREEx.ObjCoord.worldPosition = function(object3d){ object3d.updateMatrixWorld(); var worldMatrix = ...


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The solution was pretty simple actually: for ( var k in materials ) { materials[k].skinning = true; }


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As of r70 device pixel ratio for rendered can be set via: renderer.setPixelRatio(window.devicePixelRatio ? window.devicePixelRatio : 1)


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The ColladaLoader returns a scene because the loaded Model is'nt created as a 3DObject. The ColladaLoader creates a new scene added to your scene including the loaded .dae-Model. (Now it returns a group) That's because not every Model is just one Object. Check the childs of the dae.scene that you loaded, it helps a lot.


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You want the rotation from the point of view of the rotated object so you need to left-multiply the rotation. So if the final MVP matrix is from perspective*view*model then you need to insert the rotation between the model and view matrices. function rotateAroundObjectAxis(object, axis, radians) { var rotObjectMatrix = new THREE.Matrix4(); ...


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you can calculate the position of the camera using the vector normal to the plane: camera_position = plane_position + distance_to_the_plane * plane_normal or camera_position = plane_position - distance_to_the_plane * plane_normal to place the camera on the other side of the plane. After that you can rotate the camera to be pointing along the vector: ...



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