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4

CUDA has population count intrinsics for both 32-bit and 64-bit types. (__popc() and __popcll()) These could be used directly in a CUDA kernel or via thrust (in a functor) perhaps passed to thrust::transform_reduce. If that is the only function you want to do on the GPU, it may be difficult to get a net "win" because of the "cost" of transferring data ...


3

There are probably a lot of ways to tackle this. Here's one possible approach: Create an index array (or use a counting iterator) int A[] = {1, 2, 1, 1, 4, 1}; int iA[] = {0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5}; you can use thrust::sequence to do this, for example. Or you can skip the explicit generation of iA and use a counting_iterator in the next step. Use ...


2

Change your initialization constant from an integer: double d = thrust::transform_reduce(f.begin(), f.end(), exponential<double>(), 0, thrust::plus<double>()); to a double: double d = thrust::transform_reduce(f.begin(), f.end(), exponential<double>(), 0.0, thrust::plus<double>()); ...


2

The device backend refers to the behavior of operations performed on a thrust::device_vector or similar reference. Thrust interprets the array/pointer you are passing it as a host pointer, and performs host-based operations on it, which are not affected by the device backend setting. There are a variety of ways to fix this issue. If you read the device ...


2

In the future, please provide a complete example that someone can copy, paste, and compile to see the issue, without adding anything or changing anything. Float3 a[10]; creates data on the host. You cannot wrap a pointer created like that with thrust::device_ptr. It must be used to refer to data that is on the device. a is not on the device. The ...


2

This is wrong: thrust::device_ptr<unsigned int> outputPtrEnd((d_output + stride + (rows * cols))); It should be: thrust::device_ptr<unsigned int> outputPtrEnd((d_output + (rows * cols))); In your first (working) example, you are copying a region from the device to the host. On the device, that region starts at d_output and has a length of ...


1

There are a variety of ways to accomplish this. If you have vectors, and you are wanting the transform to work on consecutive sequences within the vectors, just at varying offsets, then you can add the desired offsets directly to the iterators passed to the thrust::transform call: $ cat t602.cu #include <iostream> #include ...


1

OpenCL 1.2 has popcount which would seem to do what you want. It can work on a vector, so up to ulong16 which is 1024 bits at a time. Note that NVIDIA drivers only support OpenCL 1.1 which does not include this function. Of course you could just use a function or table to compute it pretty quickly, so an OpenCL 1.1 implementation is possible as well, and ...



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