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6

Why does it work with printf? Because NVIDIA added runtime support for in-kernel printf for all hardware which supports the device ABI (compute capability >= 2.0). There is a template overload of the host printf in device code which provides (almost) standard C style printf functionality. You must include cstdio or stdio.h in your device code for this ...


6

You should be able to do this by invoking thrust::reduce within a kernel using the serial execution policy and then launching that kernel with a single thread. Something like: __global__ void serial_reduce(double *result, double *aux, int G) { *result = thrust::reduce(thrust::seq, aux, aux+G); } double *result; cudaMallocManaged(&result, sizeof(...


6

This was a real bug, and thrust developpers were already aware of it, see https://github.com/thrust/thrust/issues/775 Using the latest 1.8.3 version of thrust from the github repository solved the problem for me.


5

This is an update to my previous answer. Starting from Thrust 1.8.1, CUDA Thrust primitives can be combined with the thrust::device execution policy to run in parallel within a single CUDA thread exploiting CUDA dynamic parallelism. Below, an example is reported. #include <stdio.h> #include <thrust/reduce.h> #include <thrust/...


5

Output size of reduction depends on input data, and this value is not typically known before reduction. However, depending on your problem, sometimes you know this size. Reasonable implementations would require only at least number of key spans elements for the output. And thrust::reduce_by_key seems to be included in this list. Examples: Non-sorted (...


5

The address of a __device__ function, (or __host__ __device__) cannot be taken in host code, for use on the device: thrust::transform(X.begin(), X.end(), X.begin(), functor(&g)); ^ You will not get the ...


4

It looks like a bug of thrust::complex. The multiply operation between const thrust:complex<double> and signed long is not defined. /usr/local/cuda/bin/../targets/x86_64-linux/include/thrust/system/detail/generic/sequence.inl(48): error: no operator "*" matches these operands operand types are: const thrust::complex<double> * signed ...


4

Discard iterator is designed for this. https://thrust.github.io/doc/classthrust_1_1discard__iterator.html thrust::reduce_by_key(keys.begin(), keys.end(), values.begin(), thrust::make_discard_iterator(), result.begin());


4

The cublas function gemv does a matrix-vector product: y = alpha*A*x + beta*y The y in your above equation is represented by your devOutputPtr which you are allocating like this: float *devOutputPtr = thrust::raw_pointer_cast(thrust::device_malloc<float>(colSize)); Ordinary thrust allocations like this: thrust::device_vector<float> my_vec.....


4

If you want const-correctness, you need to be const-correct everywhere. input is a pointer to const T, therefore so should be X: const thrust::device_ptr<const T> X = thrust::device_pointer_cast(d_input);


4

thrust::device_vector is not usable in device code. However you can return a pointer to a dynamically allocated area, like so: #include <assert.h> template <typename T> __device__ T* make_array(T zeta, int l) { int N =(int)(5*l+zeta); //the size of the array will depend on l and zeta, in a complex way... T *ret = (T *)malloc(N*sizeof(T));...


4

Typical thrust code makes use of certain C++ idioms frequently (e.g. functors) so if your C++ is rusty, you may want to read about C++ functors, for example. You may also want to review the thrust quick start guide for a discussion of functors as well as the fancy iterators we will use presently. In general, at least from an expression standpoint, I think ...


4

I would use a thrust::zip_iterator to zip the key and values pairs together, and then I would do a thrust::remove_if operation on the zipped values which would require a functor definition that would indicate to remove every pair for which the value is negative (or whatever test you wish.) Here's a worked example: $ cat t1009.cu #include <thrust/remove....


4

A single Thrust::transform() can do most part of your work. All you need to do is to shift the data a little bit so that grad[i], data[i-1] and data[i+1] are aligned. thrust::transform(data.begin()+2, data.end(), data.begin(), grad.begin()+1, (_1 - _2) * 0.5); Then you can deal with ...


3

Yes, it should be possible by using thrust::reduce_by_key instead with a thrust::constant_iterator supplied for the keys.


3

Meanwhile, what am I doing wrong? thrust::reduce (or thrust::reduce_by_key) will perform a parallel reduction. This parallel reduction requires a reduction operator that can be applied pairwise. To take a very simple example, suppose we want to reduce 3 elements (E1, E2, and E3) and we have a binary operation (bOp) that we will use to define the ...


3

Converting my comment into this answer: As @JaredHoberock already stated, there is no automatic way to achieve what you want. There is always some syntactic / typing overhead. One way to reduce this overhead of writing a separate functor (as you did with my_func) is to use lambdas. Since CUDA 7.5 there is an experimental device lambda feature which allows ...


3

In thrust, you can use function/functor with __device__ qualifier. An example of vector operation saxpy is shown in the link, where you could find the functor saxpy_functor http://docs.nvidia.com/cuda/thrust/#transformations Similar to boost::compute, you could also use thrust lambda expression as thrust::transform(X.begin(), X.end(), Y.begin(), Y.begin(),...


3

There are a number of problems here which mean that this won't ever work as you imagine. In no particular order: In your loop, you construct a acc_func instance and pass it by value to a for_each call. The GPU is operating on a copy of AF. So when you call not_expected you are printing out the values of the host's original, not the copy the GPU actually ...


3

Solved! tup should have been thrust::tuple<'float, float>, not thrust::tuple<iter, iter>. Full solution: #include <iostream> #include <stdlib.h> #include <thrust/device_vector.h> #include <thrust/transform.h> #include <thrust/tuple.h> #include <thrust/transform_reduce.h> #include <thrust/iterator/...


3

What you described in your example does not look like a histogram but rather like a segmented reduction. The following example code uses thrust::reduce_by_key to sum up the masses of particles within the same cell: density.cu #include <thrust/device_vector.h> #include <thrust/sort.h> #include <thrust/reduce.h> #include <thrust/copy.h&...


3

Your thrust/CUSP side code for handling pointers is totally incorrect. This: thrust::device_ptr<int> wrapped_device_I(row_i); doesn't do what you think it does. What you have effectively done is cast a host address into a device address. That is illegal unless you are working with CUDA managed memory, and I see no evidence of that in this code. What ...


3

Yes, it's possible, pretty much exactly as you describe. Here's a fully-worked example: $ cat t1205.cu #include <thrust/execution_policy.h> #include <thrust/for_each.h> #include <thrust/device_vector.h> #include <thrust/sequence.h> #include <iostream> #include <vector> struct AddOne { int *numbers; template <...


3

The traditional way to do this is to wrap the device pointer into a thrust::device_ptr and pass that to thrust algorithms. The tag based template model in Thrust will ensure that a device execution results because of the type of the input sequence supplied in the call. #include <thrust/device_ptr.h> #include <thrust/reduce.h> int* X; cudaMalloc(...


3

The proximal issue is that in-kernel malloc and new are limited in the size of the device heap that they have available to allocate from. This limit can be raised. Please read the documentation. A few other suggestions: You're not doing any error checking after your kernel (before the first thrust call). You should do error checking on the kernel, then ...


3

You can do this using thrust:gather, something like: device_vector<int> ID(N); device_vector<float> F(M),Y(N); thrust::gather(ID.begin(), ID.end(), F.begin(), Y.begin()); In the call, ID is the map used to gather the values in F and write them into Y. [standard disclaimer: written in browser, not tested, use at own risk]


3

You can actually do all you want using one thrust::set_intersection_by_key call. However, some prerequisites need to be met: First, the easy one: You need to zip Lvalsv and Rvalsv into a single thrust::zip_iterator and pass this as the values to thrust::set_intersection_by_key. You could already run this: std::size_t min_size = std::min(Lsize, Rsize); ...


3

Quoting from the thrust documentation: The generalization is that if an element appears m times in [keys_first1, keys_last1) and n times in [keys_first2, keys_last2) (where m may be zero), then it appears min(m,n) times in the keys output range Since comp does only contain each key once, n=1 and therefore min(m,1) = 1. In order to get "all of the vals ...


3

mat-vec multiplication is a standard BLAS operation. However your data type is not a standard one (float or double). So it may not be the best choice to convert your data to double, use BLAS routines like gemv() and convert the result back to long long. Alternatively you could create your own CUDA kernel, or use Thrust to avoid writing kernel code but with ...


3

If you read the thrust quick start guide you'll find one suggestion for handling "raw" device data: use a thrust::device_ptr: You may wonder what happens when a "raw" pointer is used as an argument to a Thrust function. Like the STL, Thrust permits this usage and it will dispatch the host path of the algorithm. If the pointer in question is in fact a ...



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