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51

The word thunk has at least three related meanings in computer science. A "thunk" may be: a piece of code to perform a delayed computation (similar to a closure) a feature of some virtual function table implementations (similar to a wrapper function) a mapping of machine data from one system-specific form to another, usually for compatibility reasons I ...


39

Official answer It's none of your business. Strictly implementation detail of your compiler. Short answer Yes. Longer answer To the Haskell program itself, the answer is always yes, but the compiler can and will do things differently if it finds out that it can get away with it, for performance reasons. For example, for '''add x y = x + y''', a ...


28

In addition to user239558’s answer, and in response to your comment there, I’d like to point out some tools that allow you to inspect the heap representation of your value, find answers to questions like this yourself and to see the effect of optimizations and different ways of compiling. ghc-datasize tells you the size of a closure. Here you can see that ...


21

A thunk usually refers to a small piece of code that is called as a function, does some small thing, and then JUMPs to another location (usually a function) instead of returning to its caller. Assuming the JUMP target is a normal function, when it returns, it will return to the thunk's caller. Thunks can be used to implement lots of useful things ...


13

If b is evaluated, it will be a pointer to an Int object. The pointer is 8 bytes, and the Int object consists of a header which is 8 bytes, and the Int# which is 8 bytes. So in that case the memory usage is the Foo object (8 header, 8 Int, 8 pointer) + boxed Int (8 header, 8 Int#). When b is unevaluated, the 8-byte pointer in Foo will point to a Thunk ...


12

Some compilers for object-oriented languages such as C++ generate functions called "thunks" as an optimization of virtual function calls in the presence of multiple or virtual inheritance. Taken from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thunk#Thunks_in_object-oriented_programming


11

Let me answer this question by showing how GHC actually does this, using the ghc-heap-view library. You can probably reproduce this with ghc-vis and get nice pictures. I start by creating a data structure with an exception value somewhere: Prelude> :script /home/jojo/.cabal/share/ghc-heap-view-0.5.1/ghci Prelude> let x = map ((1::Int) `div`) [1,0] ...


8

In general, even primitive values in Haskell (e.g. of type Int and Float) are represented by thunks. This is indeed required by the non-strict semantics; consider the following fragment: bottom :: Int bottom = div 1 0 This definition will generate a div-by-zero exception only if the value of bottom is inspected, but not if the value is never used. ...


8

This is pretty simple with template haskell. Firstly, define the code in one module: module Test where --Purposely inefficient code for demonstration fib 0=0 fib 1=1 fib n=fib (n-1) + fib (n-2) Then create the value using that code with template haskell in another module. You have to do it in another module as template haskell definitions cannot call ...


7

The gist is that the with the polymorphic xs it has a type of the form xs :: Num a => [a] typeclasses under the hood are really just functions, they take an extra argument that GHC automatically fills that contains a record of the typeclasses functions. So you can think of xs having the type xs :: NumDict a -> [a] So when you run Prelude> ...


6

It would be absolutely correct to wrap every value in a thunk. But since Haskell is non-strict, compilers can choose when to evaluate thunks/expressions. In particular, compilers can choose to evaluate an expression earlier than strictly necessary, if it results in better code. Optimizing Haskell compilers (GHC) perform Strictness analysis to figure out, ...


6

Short answer: Yes. Long answer: val = 5 This has to be stored in a thunk, because imagine if we wrote this anywhere in our code (like, in a library we imported or something): val = undefined If this has to be evaluated when our program starts, it would crash, right? If we actually use that value for something, that would be what we want, but if we ...


4

There's considerable variation in use. Almost universally, a thunk is a function that's (at least conceptually) unusually small and simple. It's usually some sort of adapter that gives you the correct interface to something or other (some data, another function, etc.) but is at least seen as doing little else. It's almost like a form of syntactic sugar, ...


4

I'm going to look this up, but I thought thunking was the process employed by a 32-bit processor to run legacy 16-bit code. I used to use it as an analogy for how you have to restrict how fast you talk and what words you use when talking to dumb people. Yeah, it's in the Wikipedia link (the part about 32-bit, not my nerdalogy).


4

Here's a quick draft of a type-safe approach based on type classes: object Test { trait Wrap[A, B] { def apply(a: => A): String => B } trait LowWrap { implicit def thunkWrap[A] = new Wrap[A, A] { def apply(a: => A) = _ => a } } trait MidWrap extends LowWrap { implicit def funcWrap[A] = new Wrap[String => A, A] { def ...


4

No. There is no way to serialize a thunk in Haskell. Once code is compiled it is typically represented as assembly (for example, this is what GHC does) and there is no way to recover a serializable description of the function, let alone the function and environment that you'd like to make a thunk. Yes. You could build custom solutions, such as describing ...


3

You don't really need to go through all that work since EnumWindows (the function in the referenced question) provides a data parameter. You can put whatever value you want there, such as the object reference demonstrated in the answer. Morris's technique is better suited for callback functions that don't provide any general-purpose data parameter. To adapt ...


3

Implementing a raw thunk in the style of v-table thunks is a last resort. Whatever you need to accomplish can most likely be achieved with a wrapper function, and it will be much less painful. In general, a thunk does the following: Fix up the input parameters (e.g., convert to a different format) Call the real implementation Clean up step 1 / fix the ...


3

??= is a "trigraph" sequence for the # character. according to the standard, trigraphs are supposed to be handled as one of the first steps in processing (in phase 1 - before the preprocessor handles directives),so: ??=include "whatever" Should be equivalent to: #include "whatever" so you should be able to use that form (I wonder why the trigraph was ...


3

foo(), as well as your thunk, uses the __cdecl calling conversion, which requires the caller to push parameters on the stack. So when pf(6) is called, 6 gets pushed onto the stack via a PUSH 6 instruction, and then the thunk is entered via a CALL pf instruction. The memory that 6 occupies on the stack is located at ESP+4 when the thunk is entered, ie 4 ...


3

The key point here is that when we're evaluating (+ 2 a) the a is not a thunk, it's just a symbol that will be looked up in the environment, and whose value is a thunk. And after eval returns the thunk, force-it will take care of forcing its value. Let's step through the process. The only argument that gets delayed in your example is the 0, at the time of ...


3

There are no noticeable difference in your case. The fun keyword is syntactic sugar for val rec, which makes sure that you can reference the name that you are binding your function to in a recursive manner. Thus fun myThunk () = 2 + 2 val rec myThunk = fn () => 2 + 2 val myThunk = fn () => 2 + 2 will all yield the same result.


3

An example of each, using javascript since everybody can read it. Please don't use this code in production, use a real library, there are plenty of good ones. var a, b, c, async_obj; // assume exist // CommonJS - for reference purposes try { async_obj.asyncMethod(a, b, c, function (error1, result1) { if (error1) { console.error(error1); ...


2

Hmm, heavy duty implementation details of a 12 year old compiler. When you use __declspec(dllexport) on a class, the linker exports the members of the class. Not the vtable. That gets reconstructed in the client of the class when the compiler parses the class declaration in the header file. The linker fills in that local vtable with the exported members ...


2

Thunks are a part of the Import table (IMAGE_DIRECTORY_ENTRY_IMPORT) and Delay Import Table (IMAGE_DIRECTORY_ENTRY_DELAY_IMPORT). They are described http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms809762.aspx. I'll look at my old source code and will post later a working code which dump both this tables inclusive binding information. UPDATED: Here is a code ...


2

It is a generic term for a piece of adapter code that fundamentally changes the execution environment. I saw it first being used during the 16-bit to 32-bit Windows transition, a thunk was used to allow code that was running in 16-bit mode to call 32-bit code. Something similar for ATL thunks. It knows how to turn a Windows callback, a pure C execution ...


2

DEP is enabled per process, so you cannot disable DEP for the buggy fragment only. The options are either to rebuild a binary with fixed ATL to make the binary DEP-compatible, or disable DEP for the whole process where the binary is used. Earlier ATL versions indeed had this problem and it was fixed at some point. DEP exceptions are under My Computer, ...


2

Yes, but I wouldn't recommend it. It will (obviously) make your code a lot less portable and you're potentially opening a security hole if you're not careful. You will need to make the code executable with mprotect(2). Something like mprotect(&thunk_struct, sizeof(struct _CallBackProcThunk), PROT_READ|PROT_WRITE|PROT_EXEC). Also the normal GCC syntax ...


2

Ah, Einar, good man. Doing flash and Sharepoint stuff these days, ouch. Norwegian, might explain the trigraphs. Anyhoo, nothing complicated, you just forgot to tell the linker to look at some libraries. Right-click your project, Project Dependencies, tick the Thunk project. That makes sure that Thunk32.lib gets looked at and resolves the ctor and dtor. ...


2

I think the others answered your question nicely, but just for completeness's sake let me add that GHC offers you the possibility of using unboxed values directly as well. This is what Haskell Wiki says about it: When you are really desperate for speed, and you want to get right down to the “raw bits.” Please see GHC Primitives for some information about ...



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