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1

I think my other answer here should help you considerably, but one other thing you could check, is that you are allowing ImageMagick to use your 8GB of RAM. Try this command identify -list resource Resource limits: Width: 214.7MP Height: 214.7MP Area: 4.295GP Memory: 2GiB <--- Map: 4GiB Disk: unlimited File: 192 Thread: 1 ...


1

Use the Python Imaging Library (PIL). Install it with: pip install pillow (Pillow is an easy-to-install version of PIL. It's useful because PIL is notoriously hard to install) And then: import PIL img = PIL.open("image.tif") compression = img.info["compression"] Sample result: >>> img = Image.open('sample.tif') >>> img ...


0

Your attempt to create a 708662 pixels wide and 157480 pixels high TIFF is crazy! A little bit of calculation should tell you that these are ~104 GigaPixels! Given that you also requested tiff32nc output, this requires 32 bits (4 Bytes) per Pixel (8 bits for each of the requested CMYK channels). Do you even have 416 GigaByte of harddisk space on that ...


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Issue resolved. After installing, reinstalling, adding delegates, etc., I discovered: brew doctor I followed the prompts, ran the commands it recommended. I discovered I had a lot of stuff that was out of date, incorrect dependencies, stuff that needed pruning, etc. I finally did this: brew uninstall imagemagick brew install libtiff (even though I had ...


0

The best way (in my opinion) to handle tiff stacks is to use the Tiff library available since a few years. I must admit that I don't know much about OOP but I managed to understand enough to load a tiff stack and manipulate it.That's the kind of simple demo I wish I had seen a year ago haha. I the following example I load a single stack and store it all ...


1

There are several less complex possibilities to create a stack with only a subset of channels: Image > Stacks > Tools > Make Substack..., which lets you specify the channels/slices, and gets recorded as: run("Make Substack...", "channels=1,3-5"); Image > Duplicate..., where you can select a continuous range of channels, such as: run("Duplicate...", ...


3

If you can wait until 1st July 2015, the next release of Pillow (the PIL fork) will allow you to check this using n_frames. If you can't wait until then, you can copy that implementation,patch your own version, or use the latest dev version. More info here: https://github.com/python-pillow/Pillow/pull/1261


2

A workaround is to detect the error when there are no more images in the TIFF file: n = 1 while True: try: img.seek(n) n = n+1 except EOFError: print "Got EOF error when I tried to load", n break; Feel free to comment on my Python style - not completely happy with having to do the n+1 :) The way I solved this is ...


0

I'm so close... with this tiny poorly documented option: -dNOSUBSTDEVICECOLORS gs -sDEVICE=tiff 32nc -dNOSUBSTDEVICECOLORS -sOutputFile=CMYK.tif CMYK.pdf In all of my test, the most uncatchable was the C100M100Y100K100... now is good like M100, K100, K50, M100C20, ... ! But only the Cyan100 and Yellow100 turn again on 99% !!! I'll get it... on ...


1

Only 8-bit (or 16-bit unsigned) single-channel or 3-channel images can be saved by imwrite.


1

About using only "DUPLICAAT": You have to change your filtering a bit, to include a match for "DUPLICAAT" in there, like this: $pdfs = get-childitem . -recurse | where {$_.Extension -match "pdf" -and $_.basename -match "DUPLICAAT"} About building a new name for the TIFF: You can use group placeholders in a regular expression to retrieve your valuable ...


0

First, update to the current shipping version of Ghostscript. If you still think you see a problem, then open a bug report at httpss://bugs.ghostscript.com If you open a bug please be sure to attach the specimen file, and give a complete (as simple as possible) command line to reproduce the problem. If you are using an ICC profile, you'll need to supply ...


1

Here's a tiff file: filename <- "test.tiff" tiff(filename) plot(1) dev.off() You can read it in as raw bytes using readBin. n <- file.info(filename)$size bytes <- readBin(filename, raw(), n = n) You may prefer to read it in using tiff::readTIFF. library(tiff) the_plot <- readTIFF(filename) Then you can include it inside your other plots ...


0

You can write a callback function to get the pixel co-ordinates (X,Y) from imtool then convert to a tile number and tile index using the code below. You can then utilise the readencodedtile function in matlab function [tileidx,Tile_num] = getTileInfo(tiffile,X,Y) A = Tiff(tiffile); tile_width = A.getTag('TileWidth'); tile_length = ...


2

You can't use a TIFF directly in PostScript, as PostScript doesn't support the TIFF file format. You can use a PostScript program to read a TIFF file and process it as an image, for example : Conversion of TIFF to PDF with Ghostscript


0

From: http://www.codeproject.com/Articles/7888/A-library-to-simplify-access-to-image-metadata In .NET Framework, you can store and retrieve metadata by calling the SetPropertyItem and GetPropertyItem methods of the Image class, and you don't have to be concerned with the details of how a particular file format stores that metadata.


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Even if I do not know which metadata you need to read, maybe the standard TiffBitmapDecoder class can help you. Take a look to its Metadata property.


0

You need Visual Studio 2008. Not Visual Studio Express 2008.


0

Without lib i don't think it's possible because tiff is an adobe format. I think you should use command line of gimp with parameters or with another program like photoshop and save your image after oriented. With php and exec function i think perhaps it's possible.


0

Assuming you want to combine the 600 single-page TIFFs into one single multi-page TIFF (per set of 3), it is as simple as: convert 001_*.tiff 1_merged.tiff convert 002_*.tiff 2_merged.tiff [....] convert 200_*.tiff 200_merged.tiff Please note that nobody will be able to guarantee any timing/performance benchmarks... least while we don't even ...


0

This should do it - I will leave you to do error checking in case you haven't actually got all the images you suggest! @ECHO OFF setlocal EnableDelayedExpansion FOR /L %%A IN (1,1,200) DO ( set "formattedValue=000000%%A" set "x=!formattedValue:~-3!" convert !x!_*.tif +append !x!_merged.tif echo !x! ) So, if your images look like this ...


2

-3 >>> 0 is an unsigned shift right by 0 bits. I.e. the number is converted to an unsigned 32bit integer as opposed to -3 | 0 which converts the number to a 32bit signed integer. -3 >>> 0 === 4294967293 -3 | 0 === -3 11.7.3 The Unsigned Right Shift Operator ( >>> ) Performs a zero-filling bitwise right shift operation on the left ...


6

It's a bitwise zero-fill right shift, from MDN This operator shifts the first operand the specified number of bits to the right. Excess bits shifted off to the right are discarded. Zero bits are shifted in from the left. The sign bit becomes 0, so the result is always non-negative. For non-negative numbers, zero-fill right shift and ...



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