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48

Where I see beginners wasting weeks or months is typing at the keyboard. The computer is very responsive and will cheerfully chew up hours of your time in the edit-compile-run cycle. If you are learning you will save many hours if You plan out your design on paper before you approach a computer. It doesn't matter what design method you pick or if you ...


42

I don't think the problem is that he is missing these deadlines. I think he has a real problem in estimating the amount of time it will take to complete a task. Have him start keeping a journal of what he says a task will take and how long it actually took him to complete the task. Eventually, this journal will become a sort of guide for him to create ...


37

Daily list of what I am going to do. Remove as many distractions as possible to focus on tasks. Turn off email, turn off IM, etc... even if for a set period of time and then during a break check them. Take time to learn about other coding techniques, tools and programming wisdom. This I have found to be crucial to my development. It's to ...


32

I've found that I have to change my perspective on what my job is. As an individually-contributing developer, my job was to turn my own time in to software that the business could sell for a profit. As a team lead, my job is to see that the team effectively turns their time in to software that the business could sell for a profit. Some things ...


29

I think your question is well answered by Fred Brook's famous essay, No SIlver Bullet. You can get the essence of his argument from Wikipedia. The crux of the argument is that essential complexity, the problem the software is trying to solve, is why software is hard and slow. Accidental complexity is what new languages and IDEs solve. I disagree with all ...


28

There is an interesting article by Joel Spolsky: Evidence Based Scheduling 1) Break ‘er down When I see a schedule measured in days, or even weeks, I know it’s not going to work. You have to break your schedule into very small tasks that can be measured in hours. Nothing longer than 16 hours. This forces you to actually figure out what you are ...


25

Here's an idea: when you have larger chunks of time, write some unit tests for functionality you plan to implement. Then, when you have a 5 minute increment, choose a test and write code to satisfy it. This way you aren't spending any of your 5 minutes deciding what to work on, you already did that and documented it in the form of unit tests. And hey, you ...


23

I certainly wouldn't start by looking at "real" software projects. Like you say, it's too hard to know where to start. That's largely because large projects are more about their large-scale design than about the individual algorithms or about program flow; for one thing, you're probably looking at a complex GUI application with multi-threading, etc. There ...


22

coding had actually gotten much, much faster since 1985, thanks to vastly better tools, but now we demand more of our applications


20

As others have already stated, the problem is not convincing the programmers... it's convincing management. (If your programmers are writing "smelly" code and enjoying it, then you need new programmers.) Management is justifiably reluctant: they're in the business of running a business, not of creating beautiful code. If it won't produce a benefit for the ...


20

If your first question is what kind of punishments to be considering I think you're on a loser straight off. If you feel he does good work you may have to look at the deadlines/estimates and see if they were realistic in the first place. Who set them, if the developer in question was not involved then that may be part of the problem. I agree with @OTisler ...


19

I'm a corporate developer, the kind Joel Spolsky called "depressed" in a couple of the StackOverflow podcasts. Because my company is not a software company it has little business reason to implement many of the measures software experts recommend companies engage for developer productivity. We don't get private offices and dual 30 inch monitors. Our source ...


19

I would use Fogbugz OnDemand (here). It's free for 2 users and does everything you want from task tracking to time management. I use it myself for various pet projects and it meets all my requirements, plus it's extremely easy to set up.


19

Unfortunately, if you love coding then being a team lead, at many companies, means you will need to start delegating more of the coding to team members. You are advancing into a leadership role because you have shown an ability to get things done and have a trusted opinion. As part of this new responsibility you need to delegate more of the hard/fun tasks ...


18

Stack Over F.. wait no, heh. The biggest time-sinks for me are generally in respect to "finding the best answer." I often find that I will run into a problem that I know how to solve but feel that there is a better solution and go on the hunt for it. It is only hours/days later that I come to my senses and realize that I have 7 instances of Firefox, each ...


18

If you spend that much time at work, in my opinion, the remainder of that time you should spend with your family and friends, doing the things you like to do. I would expect 12 hours at work to enhance my skills, but not everybody is blessed with a job that is on the cutting edge of technology, and it is understood that some programmers dwell in old ...


17

I just want to mention Google's policy on the subject. 20% of the day should be used for private projects and research. I think it is time for managers to face the fact that most good developers are a bit lazy. If they weren't, we wouldn't have concepts like code reuse. If this laziness can be focused into a creative force, and the developers can read up ...


16

What kinds of punishments for passing a deadline are effective? None. If you anger him, he won't do the work, or he'll find another job. You should help him figure out why his estimates are off. There is a book by steve McConnell about making estimates. i would start there. What ways can I coherence this employee to police his actions(time ...


15

Realistically, it probably averages out to 4 or 5 hours a day. Although its "lumpy" - there may be days where there could be 8 or 9 hours of it. Of all the software developers I know, the ones that write production code (as opposed to research) 4 to 5 seems to be the max of actual coding. There is a lot of other stuff that goes on. And to be honest there ...


14

Here are a few ideas. Check StackOverflow. Check RSS feeds. Handle and delete three email messages. Write a couple unit tests. Put a few comments in your code. Delete old files and defrag your hard disk. Take a look at your calendar and to do list. Write someone an email thanking them for something. Build a project you haven't touched in a while to ...


13

The trick the Getting Things Done system teaches is to have a trusted system you can put action items into. That way you don't have to keep "juggling". To keep with the metaphor, you can put the other balls down and have confidence that they will not be forgotten. Then you can concentrate on a single ball at a time. There are many, many other excellent ...


13

I would probably try to use something like Redmine for that. It is not project management per se, it is more forge-like software but it has time-tracking, fora, documents & files uploading, a lightweight gantt-chart and bug/issue tracker. It is evolving quite rapidly, can even import Trac data.


13

I just noticed you talked about reading through source trees of other people's projects. Reading other people's code is a wonderful idea, but you must read more selectively. A lot of open-source code is hard to read and not stuff you should emulate anyway. So avoid reading any code that hasn't been recommended by a programmer you respect. Hint: Jon ...


12

Day 417. Still here. We have no source code. We lost the last of Joel's 12 tests two days ago. I can not get out. The end comes. Management failures. Management failures in the deep. They are coming.


12

Estimation is often considered a black art, but it's actually much more manageable than people think. At Inntec, we do contract software development, most if which involves working against a fixed cost. If our estimates were constantly way off, we would be out of business in no time. But we've been in business for 15 years and we're profitable, so ...


11

Just run the standard NTP daemon. It does have options to take input from several GPS devices as well as talking to network servers. Edit: I was referring to http://www.ntp.org/, not the one that comes with Windows. I don't have any suggestion as to what NTP clients are best for windows, but for Unix machines there's no real reason to not run NTP.


11

Try rememberthemilk. Good tool and has number of useful interfaces.


11

The general consensus among all industries is that task switching is detrimental. The more complex the tasks, the greater the detriment. If you are looking for scholarly arguments for this try these: A Diary Study of Task Switching and Interruptions, Microsoft Research Concerning Interruptions, Stephen B. Jenkins, IEEE Comp. Society, 2006 Information ...


10

Your manager should tell you "50% on this project, 50% on that one", or "30% on this, 70% on that". Split up your time (best is probably by week, so you can devote larger chunks of time to one task), and work on the highest priority thing for each project during that projects allotted time.


10

First, make sure you are crystal clear in your requirements. I hate to say it, but in my experience, blown deadlines are just as often a matter of unclear requirements or weak specifications on the part of a supervisor. First thing to do is to make sure the problem isn't either originating with, or exacerbated by, you. Also, make sure your requirements ...



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