New answers tagged

0

You can use Ljung-Box test: __, pvalue = sm.diagnostic.acorr_ljungbox(model[i][j].resid) # if p-value higher than confidence interval 0.95, reject H if pvalue > 0.05: use_parameters = ...


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You could use a TreeMap instead of a HashMap. A TreeMap is sorted, by default, by the natural ordering of its keys. The java.util.Date class defines a natural ordering by implementing Comparable<Date>. From the TreeMap, you can get a subset of the map over a range of keys, using TreeMap.subMap(). This version extends from fromKey inclusive to toKey ...


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Here is the solution I've used for my specific need. If someone has a better answer, let me know. freq = '2M' df[freq] = df.index.to_period(freq) # Adding a month each even month df[freq] = df[freq] + df[freq].dt.month % 2 * MonthEnd() print(df.groupby(freq).sum().head(2)) categ 2M 2015-02 5 2015-04 2


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You're looking for DatetimeIndex.asof: This will give you the closest index up to the day in df: df_week.set_index('week', inplace=True) df_week.index.asof(df['day'][1]) You can now use it to select the corresponding value: df_week.loc[df_week.index.asof(df['day'][1])] Finally, apply it to the entire dataframe: df = pd.DataFrame([dt(2016,2,8), ...


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Your objective function is unbounded below in the search domain so there is nothing scipy can do for you.


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8 months after, I don't know if it is useful for you, but, I was having a similar problem and I found your question. Maybe this will help other people anyway. First, certify that you have only 3 columns in this order: company, time, value I think the problem is because the order of the data, you need to order by company and time: example <- ...


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Regarding the second question (btw, you should only have one per post), the trick is to have your time column as the index and then unstack everything as MultiIndex columns. You can then easily perform a cumsum: df2 = (pd.DataFrame(df.groupby(['day', 'hour', 'variantid', 'eventType']).counts.sum()) .unstack(['variantid', 'eventType'])) >>> ...


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That functionality currently exists. Please refer to the documentation for more examples. stock_df = pd.DataFrame({'symbol': ['AAPL', 'AAPL', 'F', 'F', 'F'], 'date': ['2016-1-1', '2016-1-2', '2016-1-1', '2016-1-2', '2016-1-3'], 'price': [100., 101, 50, 47.5, 49]}).set_index(['symbol', 'date']) ...


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There are a few things in here that I have changed, [ (subsetting) was confused with [[ (indexing), the ggplot data frame was specified as a character variable (resulting in an error message that ggplot could not deal with character variables), the column names (that are read into the names attribute) was being confused with the first row etc. To be fair, ...


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I guess you want to regress the increase of value Y, namely Y(n+1)-Y(n) against some variable x(n) or t(n) etc., so just filter out the last row from your data frame: r2 <- lm(diff(Y) ~ ., data = credit.train[1:(length(credit.train)-1), ])


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You can extend at one end or the other (with loss of one set of predictors) using the I()-function From the ?lm page: ctl <- c(4.17,5.58,5.18,6.11,4.50,4.61,5.17,4.53,5.33,5.14) trt <- c(4.81,4.17,4.41,3.59,5.87,3.83,6.03,4.89,4.32,4.69) group <- gl(2, 10, 20, labels = c("Ctl","Trt")) weight <- c(ctl, trt) lm.D9 <- lm(I(c(diff(weight),NA)) ~ ...


2

1) This uses no explicit loops, just an apply. It assumes that the NAs are all leading as in the example given. fillIn <- function(x) { rate <- tail(x, 1) n <- sum(is.na(x)) # no of NAs c(x[n+1] - rate * seq(n, 1), na.omit(x)) } replace(data, TRUE, t(apply(data, 1, fillIn))) giving: dbh1 dbh2 dbh3 dbh4 dbh5 rate l1 25.5 26.0 26.5 ...


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You do not need to use multiple for loops for this. Here is some simplified code to do what you want just for the for loop. Working explicitly with your data we need to get the first non-NA value from each row. for_estimate <- apply(data, 1, function(x) x[min(which(is.na(x) == FALSE))]) Secondly, we need to determine what integer to multiply the rate ...


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Okay, now that I see what you want, I wrote a small program to illustrate it. The key to your order of month problem is making month a factor with the levels in the right order: library(dplyr) library(ggplot2) #initialization set.seed(1234) sday <- as.Date("2012-01-01") eday <- as.Date("2012-07-31") # List of the first day of the months mfdays <- ...


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An alternative approach that uses tidyr/dplyr instead of data.table and RcppRoll instead of zoo: library(dplyr) library(tidyr) library(RcppRoll) d %>% group_by(ID) %>% # add rows for unosberved minutes complete(Minutes = full_seq(Minutes, 1)) %>% # RcppRoll::roll_mean() is written in C++ for speed mutate(moving_mean = roll_mean(Value, ...


1

Some of the tests listed on the Wikipedia page for Heteroscedasticity can be found in the scipy.stats package. Under the circumstances, the statsmodels package (which is built on top of scipy) may be a better bet. There is an entire module dedicated to Heteroscedasticity tests.


2

"ts" class requires that the data be regularly spaced, i.e. every month should be present or NA but that is not the case here. The zoo package can handle irregularly spaced series. Read the input into zoo using the "yearmon" class for the year/month and then simply use it as a "zoo" series or else convert it to "ts". If the input is in a file but ...


1

I think you can use resample: df_total = df_concat.resample('10T') print df_total[df_total.isnull()] A 2015-01-01 00:00:00 NaN 2015-01-01 00:10:00 NaN 2015-01-01 00:20:00 NaN 2015-01-01 00:30:00 NaN 2015-01-01 00:40:00 NaN 2015-01-01 00:50:00 NaN 2015-01-01 01:00:00 NaN 2015-01-01 01:10:00 NaN 2015-01-01 01:20:00 NaN 2015-01-01 ...


0

IIUC you can use groupby and aggregate size, reset_index and last rename: print df variantid eventType date 2016-02-08 14:43:42 variant1 served 2016-02-08 14:43:46 variant1 served 2016-02-08 14:43:47 variant1 served 2016-02-08 14:43:51 variant1 served 2016-02-08 14:43:53 variant1 ...


1

I think you have to do this but I am not sure I understand your question: ggplot(data = count_by_day, aes(x=Week, y=count, group= Month, color=Month))


1

I would suggest using dplyr which runs considerably fast on large datasets. Check out the following piece of code and also make sure to have a look at the official Introduction to dplyr. library(dplyr) ## difference between capacity and load dat0 %>% mutate(diff = capacity - load) -> dat1 ## count hours with sufficient capacity dat1 %>% ...


0

Just posting my solution based on Brian Huey's suggestion. from datetime import datetime, timedelta import statsmodels.api as sm delta = timedelta(days=7) def calc_mad_mean(row): start = row['ts'] end = start + delta subset = df['score'][(start <= df['ts']) & (df['ts'] < end)] return pd.Series({'mad': sm.robust.mad(subset), ...


0

This can be done in a pretty straight forward way. The main difficulty is obviously that you try to deal with different levels of aggregation at once (average of the group and the client as well as the current record). This is rather difficult/clumsy with simple SELECT FROM GROUP BY-SQL. But with analytical functions aka Window functions this is very easy. ...


1

You could transform 1 in your binary columns to 20 and 40 respectively, add a column that defines the times in rep, generate vectors then add them up: # transform binary values m1[m1 == 1] <- 20 m2[m2 == 1] <- 40 # add column for rep() m1 <- cbind(m1, c(m1[1,1], diff(m1[,1]))) m2 <- cbind(m2, c(m2[1,1], diff(m2[,1]))) # generate timeseries a ...


0

Don't know what's wrong in the prewhiten function, but you can do it manually with: fitwhite <- fitted(Arima(xhr, model=mod1)) fitwhite2 <- fitted(Arima(ypred, model=mod1)) print(ccf(fitwhite, fitwhite2))


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You can use: refit <- Arima(y, model=mod1) accuracy(refit) This returns a bunch of measures such as MAPE and MASE to analyse how well one model can be used to predict the other data.


2

You can use this code written in D3.js : var charts = {}; charts.linechart = function (options) { var __ = options || {}; __.CHART_NAME = __.CHART_NAME || 'linechart'; __.CONTAINER = __.CONTAINER || 'canvas-svg'; __.WIDTH = __.WIDTH || 800; __.HEIGHT = __.HEIGHT || 800; __.MERGIN = __.MERGIN || {top: 20, right: 20, ...


0

I am not familiar enough with the rolling date functions - so I wondered about adding the missing data (in fact a Dataframe full of missing data) And then your rolling window should be easier to implement. from datetime import date import pandas as pd ##############Your Initial DataFrame ############## person = ['A','B','C','B','A','C','A','B','C','A',] ts ...


2

You can use a time delta to select rows within your window and then use apply to run through each row and aggregate: >>> from datetime import timedelta >>> delta = timedelta(days=7) >>> df_score_mean = df.apply(lambda x: np.mean(df['score'][df['ts'] <= x['ts'] + delta]), axis=1) 0 5.500000 1 5.500000 2 4.000000 3 ...


1

Now that Pandas supports the powerful .dt namespace on every series, it is possible to identify the start and end of each weekend without any explicit Python loops. Simply filter your time values with t.dt.dayofweek >= 5 to select only times falling on the weekend, and then group by a made-up value that is different every week — here I use year * 100 + ...


2

Problem is in difference between your local time and the UTC time you are using, and in the way ggplot displays those times when you are setting limits. To solve the problem you have to use scale_x_datetime() and there provide limits with timezone UTC and also add argument time_trans() with timezone UTC. library(scales) ggplot(data=DF1, aes(x=x1, y=y1, ...


1

Just change your error function to: error <- function (e) {print(e)#comment out if you dont want to print error salesforecast = forecastWithoutHoltWinters(salesdata, horizon) return (salesforecast) } This I think should work. :)


1

Another instance where the ave function is useful (and as such the FUN argument is actually not needed but important to remember that it is after the ellipsis in the argument list and therefore needs to be a named argument if used): df$grp.means <-with( df, ave(value,group, FUN=mean ) df$yr.anomaly <- df$value-df$grp.means df year group value ...


1

I'm no PROC EXPAND expert but this is what I came up with. Create LEADS for the maximum gap run (2) then coalesce them into INDEX. data index; infile cards dsd dlm=';'; input date:date11. index; format date date11.; cards4; 29.Jun09;-1693 30.Jun09;-1692 01.Jul09;-1691 02.Jul09;-1690 03.Jul09;-1689 04.Jul09;. 05.Jul09;. 06.Jul09;-1688 ...


1

I don't know about proc expand. But apparently this can be done with a few steps. Read the dataset and create a new variable that will get the value of n. data have; set have; pos = _n_; run; Sort this dataset by this new variable, in descending order. proc sort data=have; by descending pos; run; Use Lag or retain to fill the missing ...


0

check your input file (mcorr_001_brain_3drefit.nii.gz) with 3dinfo to see if it has a time axis (TR information). If not simply add a time axis with 3drefit.


0

to get a clearer idea of the utility of the Time Series, you could imagine this casuistry: You have a given log related to a certain date. In the case where the DB had millions of records, a search through the date field would be very expensive as it would force the query to read all the records and check the condition, while with the time series filtering ...


1

The first point is, as i allready mentioned in the comment rolling_mean needs a DataFrame you can achieve this by inserting the line speed = pd.DataFrame(data=speed) before the ave = ... line. Nonetheless you also missed to define the window attribute in rolling_std (See: http://pandas.pydata.org/pandas-docs/stable/generated/pandas.rolling_std.html)


0

I'm still not entirely sure what it is that you are after. On the assumption that given a window of data you want to identify whether its center is greater than the rest of the window at the same time as being greater than the mean of the window + h then you could do the following: peakfinder = function(x,h = 0){ xdat = as.numeric(x) meandat = ...


1

Let's see. Your "troubles" are from this part of the code #Mean returns mean.focast <- list() mean.focast[[i]] = fitted(dcc.focast[[i]] ) print(mean.focast[[i]]) You ask to print the output for each iteration (which is why you get the output you get), but note that you reinstantiate the list mean.focast in each step of the iteration. That is why you ...


1

One technique that the HDF5 people use is "shuffling", where you group each byte for N floating point values together. This is more likely to give you repetitive sequences of bytes which will compress better with gzip, for example. A second method I have found which greatly reduces the size of compressed gzipped data is to first convert the data to the ...


0

Both @user164385 and @Zakkery suggested to use a long format data set. After subseting the main data frame, a simple melt from the reshape2 and some column reformatting has provided the dataset in a form suitable for the analysis. REGION_ID date var stat value 1 1 2012-08-14 ari-1 median NA 2 2 2012-08-14 ari-1 ...


0

I think better is use periodindex by converting datetimeindex by to_period. You can fillna in column sd to 0 and use reindex with filling np.nan. import pandas as pd import numpy as np obdata = pd.read_csv('H:/Dissertation/Data/Observations/'+str(int(statid[e]))+'.txt', index_col='datetime', parse_dates={'datetime':[3,4]},date_parser=lambda x: ...


1

As you might suspect, there are a bunch of ways to do this and all have benefits and drawbacks. Three dimensional data structure The simplest approach when it comes to creating the data object might be to leave your data frame structured as is, and add a temporal component by making a list of data frames, with each item of the list being a snapshot in ...


0

If you are trying to do analysis of data, you should try to follow standards of data formatting that are best described in the reshape library. Basically, try to use same style that Oracle or any other SQL table would give you. In your case, I believe data frame would look like that: variable measurment measurment_number date value ...


0

You could also use factors and sort the levels of the factors. Not saying this is any better the the other answer, just another way!


2

As for your first question, the answer becomes evident when running sort. The single entries in the second column of your data are sorted in ascending order, and hence 'p_10', 'p_11', etc. occur before 'p_2', 'p_3', etc. unique(sort(p_data[, 2])) [1] "p_1" "p_10" "p_11" "p_12" "p_13" "p_14" "p_15" "p_16" "p_17" "p_18" "p_19" "p_2" "p_20" "p_3" "p_4" ...


1

This may help (as a template) # load packages library(ggplot2) # 2.0.0 library(ggrepel) # 0.4 library(dplyr) # 0.4.3 # make data_frame of OP data ts_tdf <- data_frame( time = paste("13", "01", 30:40, sep = ":"), v1 = c(0.689, 0.697, 0.701, 0.713, 0.235, 0.799, 0.813, 0.822, 0.00, 0.865, 0.869) ) # calculate measure of central ...


2

First, convert your prices to returns: df['daily_return'] = df.SETTLE.pct_change() Then, calculate positive/negative daily return days: df['pos_returns'] = df.daily_return.gt(0) # or df.SETTLE.gt(df.SETTLE.shift()) df['neg_returns'] = df.daily_return.lt(0) Create identifiers to group each series of returns by comparing the boolean flag to the prior ...


1

I had code that was counting consecutive up days... this might help, and you can then filter the result of the consecutive days function. In the below mdo is just a wrapper around a dataframe: def consdays(s): z=pandas.Series(index=s.index) for (i,j) in enumerate(s.index): if s.iloc[i]==1: z.iloc[i]=z.iloc[i-1]+1 else: ...



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