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3

You have a c right here: if (hours==0)c Delete the c. It works. You're welcome. I suggest proofreading your code before you come asking for help, but more importantly you should format your code so that it's legible enough to proofread. As an example: function show() { var Digital = new Date(); var hours = Digital.getHours(); var minutes = ...


0

You can work with ifs in cascade, the first if will check the date while the second checks the time, like this: =if(datevalue(A1) = datevalue("7/11/14 9:00 PM"), if(timevalue(A1) = timevalue("7/11/14 9:00 PM"), "TRUE", "FALSE"), "FALSE")


0

You could instrument the code and count the number of bytecodes executed. You can do this with bycounter. This may not be ideal for your purposes. If the programs differ by only a very few bytecodes it may not give an accurate measure of which program is actually more performant, as the cost of executing bytecodes can vary wildly. Also, if there is network ...


0

Well the best thing to do in such situations is always to benchmark it. And since the timing depends solely on your platform and OS there's really nothing we can do for you here, particularly since you nowhere explain what you actually use the timer for. Neither nanoTime nor currentTimeMillis generally guarantee monotonicity (nanoTime does on HotSpot for ...


0

As of Ruby 2, "next_month" is a method on Date: require "Date" Date.today.strftime("%Y%m") # => "201407" Date.today.next_month.strftime("%Y%m") # => "201408"


5

As always, it depends on what you're using it for. Since others are bashing nanoTime, I'll put a plug in for it. I exclusively use nanoTime to measure elapsed time in production code. I shy away from currentTimeMillis in because I typically need a clock that doesn't jump backwards and forwards around like the wall clock can (and does). This is critical in ...


0

@Glavic - small typo in your method, this line: $u = $t1->format('u') - $t2->format('u'); should be: $u = $t2->format('u') - $t1->format('u');


3

Running this very simple test: public static void main(String[] args) { // Warmup loops long l; for (int i=0;i<1000000;i++) { l = System.currentTimeMillis(); } for (int i=0;i<1000000;i++) { l = System.nanoTime(); } // Full loops long start = System.nanoTime(); for (int i=0;i<10000000;i++) { ...


0

Both questions are really too vague to answer, but this may help: Time Complexity: Given a particular SQL statement you could perhaps figure the time and complexity, but there are simply too many factors to point to a single answer. You might be interested in EXPLAIN QUERY PLAN which can help you with particular SELECTs. CPU Usage: Again, CPU usage of ...


7

I want to stress that even if the calls would be very cheap, you will not get the nanosecond resolution of your measurements. Let me give you an example (code from http://docs.oracle.com/javase/8/docs/api/java/lang/System.html#nanoTime--): long startTime = System.nanoTime(); // ... the code being measured ... long estimatedTime = System.nanoTime() - ...


8

If you are currently using currentTimeMillis() and are happy with the resolution, then you definitely shouldn't change. According the javadoc: This method provides nanosecond precision, but not necessarily nanosecond resolution (that is, how frequently the value changes) no guarantees are made except that the resolution is at least as good ...


1

Your code should really be corrected on other points, but for your question : On this line DateTime.TryParseExact(inputime, "HH:mm:ss", enUS, System.Globalization.DateTimeStyles.None, out dt); you're creating a DateTime with hours minutes and seconds. If you don't provide year, month, day, the current day will be taken. So you need to parse with year, ...


0

Read the time into a TimeSpan (using e.g. TimeSpan.Parse), and use the date of the file as the start value. To get the full date and time you can then simply do currentDate + currentTime Also, be careful about midnight. IIRC some cultures count midnight as part of the previous day and others might have it part of the next day.


0

Please try this, var dt = new DateTime(2010, 06, 26); // time is zero by default string currTime = "19:04:06";//dateTimePicker1.Value.TimeOfDay.ToString(); var tm = TimeSpan.Parse(currTime); var fullDt = dt + tm;


3

The minimum change is to use setTimeInMillis using System.currentTimeMillis rather than setTime: while (now.compareTo(stop) < 0 ) { // Ugh, busy wait, see below now.setTimeInMillis(System.currentTimeMillis()); } ...or actually, just use milliseconds in the first place: long stopAt = stop.getTimeMillis(); while ...


0

I have a solution to make the labels look consistent, though bear in mind that it will also include the time on the "larger scale" time plot. The code below uses the matplotlib.dates functionality to choose a date format for the x-axis. Note that as we're using the matplotlib formatting you can't simple use df.plot but must instead use plt.plot_date and ...


1

This is old, so I hope you were able to get something working. I faced a very similar problem. In my case, I found that the inconsistency was almost entirely due to timer coalescing, which causes timers to be wrong by up to 10% on iOS devices in order to save battery usage. For reference, here's a solution that I've been using in my own app. First, I use a ...


0

Many devices will OTA update their internal clock multiple times per hour. You can usually capture a log statement when it happens (like OTA). My understanding it that these updates only affect what is returned by System.currentTimeMillis(). This is why it is recommended to use android's SystemClock interface for timing.


2

Your question is not very specific, so I'm going to answer to what I think you're asking, however there are many ways to go about doing this. How can I get the time on Central Standard Time? Using PHP's date_default_timezone_set(), like so: date_default_timezone_set("America/Chicago"); Here's the list of supported timezone strings. How can I ...


0

Allow me to answer this question directly. Is there a way to define the timezone for an application in ASP.NET such that all times read from/compared to current server time are implicitly converted ... No, this is not possible. There is no mechanism in .NET to change the local time zone on a per-thread or per-application basis. It can only be changed ...


0

Probably a little late- but this would work and be more succinct: SELECT * FROM table WHERE endTime BETWEEN DATE_SUB(NOW(), INTERVAL 5 MINUTE) AND NOW()


0

Great work Samsung did, just put all phone to time.gpsonextra.net and then disable the supl host .....


0

Try this: String dateStr = "17642"; String timeStr = "28040"; int dateInt = Integer.parseInt(dateStr); int timeInt = Integer.parseInt(timeStr); GregorianCalendar gc = new GregorianCalendar(1980 + ((dateInt >> 9) & 0x1FF), ((dateInt >> 5) & 0xF) - 1, dateInt & 0x1F, ((timeInt >> 11) & 0x1F), ...


0

A quick Google gave the following solution for converting the date format to YYYYMMDD, which you can then parse. Using this and the specs you should be able to work out the time function as well. public String getDate(Integer date, String sep) { return String.format("%04d", ((date >> 9) & 0x1FF)+1980)+sep+ String.format("%02d", (date ...


0

I solved this, so I'm going to be one of those internet heroes that answers their own question. This is achieved by using static python variables for the counter and for the stop value (ex: stop after you grab 20 tweets). This is currently a geolocation search, but you could easily swap it for a hashtag search by changing the location to track['worldcup'] or ...


1

I think this might work: $start_date = strtotime(date('Y-m-d 00:00:00', 1404349200)); $end_date = strtotime(date('Y-m-d 23:59:59', 1404936000)); $total_time_here = $end_date - $start_date; $number_overnights = (int) ($total_time_here / 60 / 60 / 24);


2

Try this (from http://php.net/manual/en/function.date-default-timezone-set.php) <?php date_default_timezone_set('Europe/Brussels'); //added line $b = time(); $hour = date("g", $b); $m = date("A", $b); if ($m == "AM") { if ($hour == 12) { echo "Good Evening!"; } elseif ($hour < 4) { echo "Good ...


3

You are going to want to set your default time zone. Here is a handy script straight from the PHP docs... date_default_timezone_set('America/Los_Angeles'); $script_tz = date_default_timezone_get(); if (strcmp($script_tz, ini_get('date.timezone'))){ echo 'Script timezone differs from ini-set timezone.'; } else { echo 'Script timezone and ini-set ...


0

You can make computations using seconds from epoch: import time t0 = time.time() # now (in seconds) t1 = t0 + 60*30  # now + 30 minutes t2 = t0 + 60*60 # now + 60 minutes for t in [t0,t1,t2]: print time.strftime("%I %M %p",time.localtime(t)) output 09 57 PM 10 27 PM 10 57 PM if you want to round the time to the previous half-hour, add this line: ...


6

For time offsets you can use datetime.timedelta: >>> import datetime >>> datetime.datetime.now() datetime.datetime(2014, 7, 9, 21, 47, 6, 178534) >>> datetime.datetime.now() + datetime.timedelta(hours=1) datetime.datetime(2014, 7, 9, 22, 47, 16, 851338) As for your code, here's an example with couple of improvements: import ...


0

Is this what you want? library(reshape2) library(ggplot2) df <- melt(stackdata, id.var = c("month", "user.nm")) df$hour <- as.numeric(gsub(pattern = "^.*\\.", "", df$variable)) ggplot(data = df, aes(x = hour, y = value)) + stat_summary(fun.y = mean, geom = "point") + stat_summary(fun.y = mean, geom = "line") + scale_x_continuous(breaks = ...


1

This solution write in a different file the output. If you want to write on the same file, you need to load and process your input file as a list of rows, and then write to the the same file. import csv with open('input.csv', 'r') as inf, open('output.csv','wb') as outf: reader = csv.reader(inf, delimiter=',') writer = csv.writer(outf, ...


2

You need to actually read the input file as CSV. Compare and contrast, with some dummy data: >>> demo = ['id,time,data', '1,14:17:33,7', '2,14:17:34,10'] Iterating over the "file" directly: >>> for row in demo: row[1] 'd' ',' ',' Iterating over it read as CSV: >>> import csv >>> for row in csv.reader(demo): ...


0

The reason this has so many downvotes is it takes a single in-built function to change a Date to a timestamp, using a single Google search to find. echo strtotime("2014-06-10T11:05:10.723Z"); Outputs: 1402398310


1

may be you can do something like: # create a new column with only time from your date column df['time'] = df['date'].apply(lambda x: x.time()) #filter based on the time column mask = (df['time'] > datetime.time(11,00)) & (df['time'] < datetime.time(11,30)) df = df[mask]


0

This is because the time zone you have chosen is America/New_York. The time zone should be GMT for it to return 0 value. The toMillis method will return the number of milliseconds since epoch. Epoch is 1 January 1970 00:00:00 UTC(GMT).


0

It would always easier if sample data and expected output is given in the question. Solution with Data.table package require(data.table) data <- fread('temp.csv',sep=',') #Assuming your data is in temp.csv #if above step not executed, convert the data frame to data.table data <- data.table(data) > str(data) Classes ‘data.table’ and 'data.frame': ...


0

It can be done in JavaScript without plugins. You need to get the current date time, down to the denominator that is one smaller than what you are displaying. With your example, this would mean you need to get everything down to milliseconds. var currentTime = new Date(n.getFullYear(), n.getMonth(), n.getDate(), n.getHours(), n.getMinutes(), ...


0

Basic PHP dates math. strtotime() returns a unix timestamp, which is number of seconds since the epoch, midnight January 1,1970. date() takes those timestamps and formats them into whatever representation you want. But 'H' is NOT "hours since time zero". it's "hours of the day". If you have a timestamp that represents Jul 8/2014 12 noon, then H is going to ...


2

It's easier with DateTime: $date = new DateTime('18:00:00'); $date->modify('+8 hours'); echo $date->format('H:i'); Edit: Maybe I don't understand the question then. If you want to get 26, then you can use something like: $date = new DateTime('18:00:00'); echo $date->format('H') + 8;


0

Try setting defaultValue to "00:00". It worked to me.


0

Maybe have some sort of TickCounter in which there's a map that takes a key value pair of (item_count and timestamp). You update this in your second UpdateListener and of course you can always lookup the item of key 20. By the way, I've used your Bollinger Band Calculation but using Storm and the EsperBolt. Blogged about it here: ...


0

Now as you have string[] str = split[1].Split('/'); // create a new DateTime int minutes = int.Parse(str[1]); if(minutes >= 30) hour = int.Parse(str[0]) + 1 // make sure if it 13 or 25 make it 1 minutes = 0 ; sec = 0; else { ...


2

Get that date from the string into a DateTime struct. See for example the TryParseExact method Then you can create a new DateTime value, based on year/month/day/hour of the value from the previous step, setting the minute and second parts to zero (see here ) Add one hour if the minutes or seconds part (of your first value) is not zero, using .AddHours(1), ...


0

Can you convert the string to a datetime? Something like: dateVariable = Convert.ToDateTime(dateString); int hour = dateVariable.Hour; int minute = dateVariable.Minute; And then do the rounding.


1

By calculating difference and dividing by 1000 to get seconds; milliseconds don't care about dates, months, etc. sub diff { my ($aa, $bb) = @_ return ($bb - $aa)/1000; }


1

So my question is if this ObjectID is it the MongoID? Mongodb identifies documents by their _id field. If you not supply an _id field at insertion, the mongodb server will generate an ObjectId for that document (into its _id field). In php, these values will be converted to the MongoId class. ... if we were able to use the mongoID to get the time ...


0

If you can use C++11 you can substract and add dates easy: #include <iostream> #include <chrono> #include <ctime> #include <ratio> using namespace std; int main () { chrono::system_clock::time_point today = chrono::system_clock::now(); chrono::system_clock::duration dtn (chrono::duration<int,ratio<60,1>>(10)); ...


0

i don't know if there are any method for struct tm but I think you should read about chrono available in C++11. Link


1

cppreference shows enough functions (mktime, localtime) to convert struct tm with time_t. Calculations are obvious with time_t because it is an integral type traditionally representing the number of seconds since newyear 1970.



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