Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

problem solved I added this inside my controller : var heure=$state.params.heure+""; var h=heure.substring(0, 2); var m=heure.substring(3, 5); var s=heure.substring(6, 9); $scope.heureDepart = { value: new Date(1970, 0, 1, h, m, s ) }; and this ng-model="heureDepart.value" to my ng-model


0

The construction time for a DFA from an NFA is O(2^m) where m is the number of nodes. The running time of a DFA is O(n) where n is the length of the input string. This is because there is only 1 path through the DFA for a given string. The construction time for an NFA should be O(m), where m is the number of nodes The running time for an NFA is O(m²n) ...


2

dict_name[a][b][c][d] = 0 This is essentially the same as the following temp_a = dict_name[a] temp_b = temp_a[b] temp_c = temp_b[c] temp_c[d] = 0 So you just have three lookups, in which you get an object from a dictionary which just happens to be another dictionary. And then, in the final step, you make one dictionary assignment. As we know, ...


3

Python's dictionary implementation doesn't change with nesting, no, so the algorithmic complexity of a lookup does not change. As far as Python is concerned, each [key] subscription is independent from where the object you are subscribing came from. Each lookup is still O(1). Looking up a nested element is then depth times a O(1) lookup. Since you ...


0

The secured channel is encrypted with PKI plus the timestamp, and the default skew is 5 minutes. That is, the different between client and server should not be more than 5 minutes. For more details how this works, google "wcf clock skew". Windows since Win2k had come with built-in feature to sync clock with a NTP server, so make sure such feature is turned ...


2

This will keep your time in a standards-approved format: Need #include <chrono> std::string sTime = "1440966379"; // this value has been read from a file. std::chrono::system_clock::time_point newtime(std::chrono::seconds(std::stoll(sTime))); // this gets you out to a minimum of 35 bits. That leaves fixing the overflow in the // capable hands of ...


0

System.out.println(new SimpleDateFormat("HH:mm:ss").format(Calendar.getInstance().getTime())); //time 21:57:54


1

Just remove new Timestamp: import java.util.Date; public class GetCurrentTimeStamp { public static void main(String[] args) { java.util.Date date = new java.util.Date(); System.out.println(date.getTime()); // 1440948253205 } } Note that int is too small to store the Date. You need a long variable.


0

Just a little expansion of the answer from Stacey.K about using the Measure-Command from PowerShell: You can invoke powershell from the standard Command Prompt, like this: powershell -Command "Measure-Command {echo hi}" This will eat the standard output, but you can prevent that by adding | Out-Default, like this (from PowerShell): Measure-Command ...


0

you can use "ON DUPLICATE KEY", so you create a unique key on the ip field INSERT INTO YOURTABLE (the_ip,the_timestamp) VALUES(userip,now()) ON DUPLICATE KEY set timestamp=now();


0

You can also use a Countdown Timer just put at the ontick an element of int = bob++; String convertbob = String.valueof(bob); TextViewName.setText(convertbob); and what ever you wanted to do at onFinish I hope it would help others, its okay to cheat the real function of countdown just be wise.


2

I'm going to go out a limb and say that you're not running on an RTOS. As a result, your application is just one of many user applications all in competition for the CPU. What more than likely happened is another application stole the CPU from yours and you had to wait. I would highly recommend reading up on the Linux scheduler. Here's a good starting ...


0

Here is an answer that will work on any platform that supports C++11 or C++14. It builds off of the std::chrono library that was introduced in C++11. It also uses a free, open source, cross platform library to simplify the arithmetic (MIT license which is usually considered lawyer-friendly). If you don't need to take leap seconds into account, you can use ...


3

You need to parse the time part as well: datetime.strptime(dateTimeStart, "%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S") Then you can compare your dates like this: if dateTime1.date() > date.today(): print "No" The date() function returns the date of a datetime object.


0

You can use this class for your needs: public abstract class MyCountDownTimer { private CountDownTimer cdt; private long millisInFuture; private long countDownInterval; public MyCountDownTimer(long millisInFuture, long countDownInterval) { this.millisInFuture = millisInFuture; this.countDownInterval = countDownInterval; ...


0

Step 1: Get current weekday. Example: time_t rawtime; struct tm * timeinfo; time(&rawtime); timeinfo = localtime(&rawtime); Now you have the current weekday in timeinfo->tm_wday, as value from 0 to 6. Step 2: Calculate the difference of weekdays and multiply by 24, add/subtract the difference of hours, modulo divide by 24 to get the days. or ...


0

;with cte as( select *, row_number() over(partition by wd order by ot) rn from (select workingDate wd, openTime ot from workingSchedule union select workingDate, closeTime from workingSchedule union select breakDate, breakStart from breakTable ...


0

create table #answer (workdate datetime null, starttime time null, endtime time null ) declare cur cursor for (select workingDate,openTime,closeTime from workingSchedule) declare @workingDate datetime,@openTime time,@closeTime time,@breakStart time,@breakEnd time,@breakEnd2 time,@counter int set @counter = 0; open cur fetch cur into ...


0

You can try this DECLARE @Tab TABLE ( [Date] [datetime], [Time] [time], [Row] int ) DECLARE @Tab2 TABLE ( [Date] [datetime], [Row] int ) INSERT INTO @Tab2 SELECT DISTINCT(workingDate) , ROW_NUMBER() OVER(ORDER BY [workingDate]) FROM workingSchedule DECLARE @Count int; DECLARE @Num [int]; DECLARE @Dat [datetime]; SET @Num=1; SET @Count=(SELECT count(*) ...


0

Here is the query to get desired output ;WITH CTEOrderedBreaks AS ( SELECT row_number() over(partition by breakdate order by breakdate,breakstart asc) as rnob, row_number() over(partition by breakdate order by breakdate,breakstart DESC) as rnobr, breakdate, breakstart, breakend from breakTable ), CTESUMMARY AS ( ...


0

In situations like this, I use ROW_NUMBER (https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms186734.aspx) to help join splits inside a single day. I used a UNION, but I think you could use the same join logic I have, but get away with a SELECT statement. SELECT workingDate as [date], openTime as [Start], COALESCE(breakStart, closeTime) as [End] FROM ...


1

try $t1 = "55:10.01"; $t2 = "11.2"; if (date($t1) > date($t2)){ $res = 'true'; }else{ $res = 'false'; } print($t1.' > '.$t2.' = '.$res);


0

This version of the accepted answer makes it a bit prettier if you are dealing with video lengths for example: 1:37:40 (1 hour / 37 minutes / 40 seconds) 1:00 (1 minute) 2:20 (2 minutes and 20 seconds) String.prototype.toHHMMSS = function () { var sec_num = parseInt(this, 10); // don't forget the second param var hours = Math.floor(sec_num / 3600); ...


0

Heres a simple function (not using RegEx) that validates the time formats you've requested. function valTime(time) { var len = time.length, hour, mins; if(len == 5) { //HH:MM var spl = time.split(':'); if(!$.isArray(spl)) { return false; } //Not an array hour = spl[0]; mins = spl[1]; } if(len ...


2

Not too sure what the problem is, it's easy ^_^ var timeregex = /^([01]?[0-9]|2[0-3]):?([0-5][0-9])$/; Now match it... var match = rawtime.match(timeregex); And you get... var hours = parseInt(match[1],10), minutes = parseInt(match[2],10); Done?


0

Time dtNow = new Time(); dtNow.setToNow(); int hours = dtNow.hour; str = dtNow.format("%H:%M"); if i use this way, the time zone set by the Date&Time settings page will get reflected without any reboot. system.currentTimeMillis() will return UTC time.


0

Have a look here, with mHour and mMinute, you are removing from the DatePicker the hours before 6:00:00; copying from the link here is the problem: public TimePickerDialog (Context context, int themeResId, TimePickerDialog.OnTimeSetListener listener, int hourOfDay, int minute, boolean is24HourView) Added in API level 1 Creates a new time picker dialog ...


0

Convert seconds into HH:MM:SS in Ruby t = 323 # seconds Time.at(t).utc.strftime("%H:%M:%S") => "00:03:56"


2

With PHP dates, m stands for month. What you need is i: <td>{{date('h:i A',strtotime($sched->time_out))}}</td> Here is a reference table for all format characters


0

Using timers is one way you can achieve, In ViewDidload self.myTimer = NSTimer(timeInterval: 30.0, target: self, selector: "refresh", userInfo: nil, repeats: true) NSRunLoop.mainRunLoop().addTimer(self.myTimer, forMode: NSDefaultRunLoopMode) func refresh() { // a refresh of the table }


0

1.performQuery every 30s. 2.compare the different between old datas and new datas. 3.Insert the different part by using this Api (void)insertRowsAtIndexPaths:(NSArray *)indexPaths withRowAnimation:(UITableViewRowAnimation)animation rather than reloadData


1

As far as I can see, this is not trivially possible using the string templates. I would recommend to stick to the method you already mentioned. If you're interested in shortening the code and since you'll probably always use the same values for WITHOUT_SECONDS and FORMAT_ACCORDING_TO, you could wrap it in a method with a returning parameter so that your code ...


0

To do that, you need to pass the default argument as timezone.now in publication_date model field. models.py class Book(models.Model): title = models.CharField(max_length = 100) authors = models.ManyToManyField(Author) publisher = models.ForeignKey(Publisher) # pass the default argument in publication_date field publication_date = ...


0

Modify your model as follows: publication_date = models.DateField(default=timezone.now) As explained in the DateField documentation Automatically set the field to now when the object is first created. Useful for creation of timestamps. Note that the current date is always used; it’s not just a default value that you can override. So even if you set a ...


0

You've run in one of the basic limiting factors of the CPython implementation, the Global Interpreter Lock or GIL. Effectively this serializes your program, your threads will take turns executing. One thread will own the GIL, while the other threads will wait for the GIL to come free. One solution would to be use separate processes. Each process would have ...


0

You can use DateTime (If you are using date format Y-m-d H:i:s or similar) $begindate = new DateTime($_POST['LeaveFrom'].' '.$_POST['BeginTime']); $enddate = new DateTime($_POST['Leaveto'].' '.$_POST['EndTime']); $diff = $begindate->diff($enddate); print_r($diff); Output: DateInterval Object ( [y] => 0 [m] => 0 [d] => 1 [h] ...


0

I'd assume 200µs is closer to the truth, considering your comport will have something like 115200baud; assuming messages are 8 bytes long, transmitting one message would take about 9/115200 s ~= 10/100000 = 1/10,000 = 100µs on the serial line alone. Being faster than that will be pretty impossible. Python is definitely not the language of choice to do ...


0

If you know that you will never have more than 365 days, you can use a valid date and only print the numbers. I'm thinking of something like this: select (case when ts1 - ts2 < 1 then '000d ' || to_char(date '2000-01-01' + (t1 - t2), 'HH24:MI:SS') else to_char(date '2000-01-01' + (t1 - t2) - 1, 'DDDd HH24:MI:SS') end) ...


0

SQL Fiddle Oracle 11g R2 Schema Setup: Query 1: WITH times ( start_time, end_time ) AS ( SELECT TIMESTAMP '2015-01-01 00:00:00', TIMESTAMP '2015-01-03 10:25:30.350' FROM DUAL UNION ALL SELECT TIMESTAMP '2015-01-01 00:00:00', TIMESTAMP '2015-01-01 09:00:00.000607' FROM DUAL UNION ALL SELECT TIMESTAMP '2015-03-01 00:00:00', TIMESTAMP '2016-03-01 ...


1

Which is the more suitable one to your experience? It all depends on what you want to do. Generally using the timer to animate or to run things with a specific delay is good enough. However if you do this, everything runs in the EDT (Event Dispatch Thread). But if you doing a complicated program with plenty of calculation and image rendering, it may ...


1

The Timer is by far the better option of the two, however I would recommend you use a SwingWorker instead. In terms of performance, If you look at the code you wrote, you'll see that the timer only executes every 3 seconds (3000 milliseconds), while the Thread will continuously run with no delay due to the while loop, making the Timer much better, unless ...


1

The difference is in the threads your code is running. Solution one creates it's own thread and updates the label from that. Solution 2 uses the awt Timer class. It spawns it's own thread but the actionPerformed method is called on the AWT-EventQueue thread. Since all changes to the components should only happen on the AWT-EventQueue that's the correct ...


0

If you are not concerned about a conflict in time between different client computer time/ time zones, you can do this using javascript. First, set a data-attribute on your items to say what max time would be to show: <ul class="c-dropdown__list time"> <li class="c-dropdown__item--time" data-dropdown-value="ASAP" data-max="1130">11:00 - ...


0

Would this be considered a server side or can be it be done with javascript? You'll need to do this on the server side. If you do it on the client side the time will be taken from the user's computer and need not necessarily be accurate (for instance if they have intentionally set their computer clock to be 15 minutes ahead).


0

There is no "ActiveSheet" when running on time trigger, hence it becomes undefined, use one of these methods from SpreadsheetApp to retrive the spreadsheet: open(file) Spreadsheet Opens the spreadsheet that corresponds to the given openById(id) Spreadsheet Opens the spreadsheet with the given ID. openByUrl(url) Spreadsheet Opens the spreadsheet with the ...


1

If fps is reasonable, then I think that performance won't be an issue and the UI will remain responsive. Anyway I think it is much more elegant to achieve the same result using an animation... You can use a NumberAnimation to continuously update the value of the progress bar, and then start the animation when you want to start counting the time left...


0

Let's see how time.ctime() handles one-digit day-of-months: In [1]: import time In [2]: time.ctime(1) Out[2]: 'Thu Jan 1 01:00:01 1970' We see that it is formatted like %2d. So the total length up to the time is ten characters: In [3]: time.ctime(1)[:10] Out[3]: 'Thu Jan 1' The year is in the last four characters: In [4]: time.ctime(1)[-4:] Out[4]: ...


1

I don't see anything wrong in your code. But i would use this syntax instead: SUM(ABS(DATEDIFF(minute, a.[Time], @StartDate)))


0

I think that the following: CASE WHEN a.[Time] > @StartDate THEN DATEDIFF(minute,@StartDate,a.[Time]) ELSE DATEDIFF(minute,a.[Time],@StartDate) END Should do it and will always give a positive value. select datediff(minute, '2015-08-02 09:30 PM' ,'2015-08-03 02:30 AM') Returns 300, which is correct (5 hours, 5 * 60 =300)


1

tenures$isoStart <- as.Date(tenures$DateHired, format="%d/%m/%y") tenures$isoFinish <- as.Date(tenures$TerminationDate, format="%d/%m/%y") tenures$periods = interval(tenures$isoStart, tenures$isoFinish) Your date format "%d/%m/%Y" did not reflect the two-digit years in your data. The capital %Y is for four-digit years. Also, the interval ...



Top 50 recent answers are included