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495

import time time.sleep(5) # delays for 5 seconds Here is another example where something is run once a minute: import time while True: print "This prints once a minute." time.sleep(60) # Delay for 1 minute (60 seconds)


144

You can use the sleep() function in the time module. It can take a float argument for sub second resolution. from time import sleep sleep(0.1) # Time in seconds.


38

What You Need Is time.sleep(sec) where sec is how many seconds delay you add there you also need to import time


26

Please read http://www.faqts.com/knowledge_base/view.phtml/aid/2609/fid/378, which can help you further: Try the sleep function in the time module. import time time.sleep(60) And put this in a while loop and a statement will only execute on the minute... That allows you to run a statement at predefined intervals regardless of how long the ...


22

try this: var timer; function chk_me(){ clearTimeout(timer); timer=setTimeout(function validate(){...},1000); } in this way every time a key is pressed the timeout will be deleted and the set again.


18

Node is asynchronous by nature, and that's what's great about it, so you really shouldn't be blocking the thread, but as this seems to be for a project controlling LED's, I'll post a workaraound anyway, even if it's not a very good one and shouldn't be used (seriously). A while loop will block the thread, so you can create your own sleep function function ...


18

There is a built-in Python module called time. Use it like this: import time time.sleep(5)


17

You can do it with regular javascript using setTimeout(). $('.masonryRecall').click(function(){ setTimeout("$('#mainContent').masonry()", 1500); });


16

Use PHP sleep() function. http://php.net/manual/en/function.sleep.php This stops execution of next loop for the given number of seconds. So something like this for ($i=0; $i <= 10; $i++) { $file_exists=file_exists($location.$filename); if($file_exists) { break; } sleep(3); // this should halt for 3 seconds for every loop }


14

Thread.Sleep(5000) only suspends your thread for 5 seconds - no code onto this thread will be executed during this time. So no messages or anything else. If it's an ASP.NET app, client doesn't know what's going on on server and waits server's response for 5 seconds. You have to implement this logic manually. For example, either using JavaScript: ...


13

You should generally stay away from string literals in setTimeout/setInterval. Instead use a closure: setTimeout(function(){ $('#mainContent').masonry(); }, 1500);` and even better use it like this (note: the outer closure isn't really necessary): (function($){ var timeout=null; $('.masonryRecall').click(function(){ clearTimeout(timeout); ...


13

The best solution is to create singleton controller for your LED which will queue all commands and execute them with specified delay: function LedController(timeout) { this.timeout = timeout || 100; this.queue = []; this.ready = true; } LedController.prototype.send = function(cmd, callback) { sendCmdToLed(cmd); if (callback) callback(); // or ...


12

There is a built in python module named time. The 2 examples are identical but differ only in the way the method is imported from the module: 1 Use This: import time time.sleep(Num of seconds to sleep) 2 Use this: from time import sleep sleep(Num of seconds to sleep)


11

In standard C (C99), you can use time() to do this: #include <time.h> : void waitFor (unsigned int secs) { retTime = time(0) + secs; // Get finishing time. while (time(0) < retTime); // Loop until it arrives. } By the way, this assumes time() returns a 1-second resolution value. I don't think that's mandated by the standard so you ...


11

The technique you're looking for is called cross correlation. It's a very simple, if somewhat compute intensive technique which can be used for solving various problems, including measuring the time difference (aka lag) between two similar signals (the signals do not need to be identical). If you have a reasonable idea of your lag value (or at least the ...


10

Another approach, without globals: var typewatch = function(){ var timer = 0; return function(callback, ms){ clearTimeout (timer); timer = setTimeout(callback, ms); } }(); Usage: Attaching the event through JavaScript: window.onload = function () { document.getElementById('domain').onkeyup = function() { ...


8

Check sleep(3) man page or MSDN for Sleep


8

appart from just using the javascript setTimeout and assuming YUI 3. yui-lang-later has a later method that wraps setTimeout var handle = Y.later( 1000 * 14, window, function(){ // do something }, [], false); // got bored handle.cancel(); // will prevent the function being called.


7

You can use DelayQueue for this. It's a concurrent collection that only allows items to be taken from it once they have "expired". The items you add must implement Delayed. You might also just want to use a ScheduledExecutorService. For example, for each domain you were crawling, you could schedule a task that grabs the next link, then re-schedules another ...


7

Don't pass validate directly to setTimeout, but rather call it from within an anonymous function: var timer; function chk_me(arg) { clearTimeout(timer); timer = setTimeout(function () { validate(arg); }, 1000); }


6

Use Thread.Sleep(5000) in order to suspend a thread for 5 seconds, instead of your code - it has several logical errors. present will be the value of DateTime.Now when that line is executed, and add30Seconds will be the value of DateTime.Now plus 5 seconds when that line is executed. These variables will not update and will not change their values. This ...


6

You really should not sleep the UI thread like this, you are likely to have your application force close with ActivityNotResponding exception if you do this. If you want to delay some code from running for a certain amount of time use a Runnable and a Handler like this: Runnable r = new Runnable() { @Override public void run(){ ...


6

I found my problem The problem is that there's no way right now to circumvent this issue due to the design of the SimpleDateFormat api. Only faster phones might fix this by just taking less time to collect those strings. So I hope there will be no problem with the time zone in the next versions of android skd, and in the newer phones. till then careful ...


6

kbhit() doesn't wait for any input, it just returns if there is a key pressed at the very instant you make the test. So in this case you never hit the key exactly when you need to and you're dropping into the Sleep right away. Normal usage is something like: while (!kbhit()) So you can sit and wait for a key press. In your case since you want to sleep, ...


5

from the docs http://api.jquery.com/delay/ The .delay() method is best for delaying between queued jQuery effects. Because it is limited—it doesn't, for example, offer a way to cancel the delay—.delay() is not a replacement for JavaScript's native setTimeout function, which may be more appropriate for certain use cases. you can use setTimeout ...


5

Instead of sleeping for 20000 useconds, sleep for the time left till you want to run again, based on the call to clock_gettime I.e: usleep( lasttime+20000-now ); // But make sure you don't sleep when the result is negative It is not that your code has a problem, but the actual call to sleep, reading the time, etc. takes time, and the system can't sleep ...


5

Sleeping functions on non-realtime systems are not guaranteed to sleep the exact period specified; on a busy system, the process will be woken up only when its time slice begins. Or, as the man page puts it, "system activity may lengthen the sleep by an indeterminate amount". The close-to-10ms amount sounds like the kern.hz frequency is lowered to 100, as ...


5

You didn't explain why you actually need threads here. If you had, I might have been able to explain why you don't need them. ;) That aside, I can confirm that your basic understanding of things is correct. One possible misunderstanding I can clear up, though, is the notion that "python threads" and "Twisted threads" are at all different from each other. ...


5

Here is how you can do it on most desktop systems: #ifdef _WIN32 #include <windows.h> #else #include <unistd.h> #endif void wait( int seconds ) { // Pretty crossplatform, both ALL POSIX compliant systems AND Windows #ifdef _WIN32 Sleep( 1000 * seconds ); #else sleep( seconds ); #endif } int main( int argc, ...


5

If you know your clock frequency is x Hz, and you want to wait y seconds, then simply use a counter and wait until you reach the number x*y. e.g. for a clock of 1kHz and a delay of 3 seconds this code will trigger do_something after the time delay. `define CLOCK_FREQ 1000 `define TIME_DELAY 3 reg [31:0] count=0; assign do_something = ...



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