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5

You want setInterval. setTimeout is a one-shot deal. setInterval(function () { countUp(counter) }, 100);


3

The issue you are facing is because the window is not re-drawing itself at any point because your code doesn't exit the autohide() routine until dx is 150, so it will just have a delay before re-drawing in the final position. You probably also want to change the position rather than the width. The better option would be to start up a Timer which then ...


3

You are using double time variable as function here time(&rawt);. Try to rename time to t, for example.


2

You will have to dig into the function and change var timer = createTimer(), to this.timer = createTimer(); to be able use something like Stopwatch.timer.innerHTML; however the way the timer is created now, the object is not accessible as it is. This works without changes: window.onload=function() { var elems = document.getElementsByClassName("basic"); ...


2

Have you considered using global variables saving the current time value? Sub startTimer27() starttime = Now 'MsgBox("The timer is running.") End Sub Sub stopTimer27() timetaken = Now - starttime MsgBox ("The time elapsed is " & Hour(timetaken) & ":" & Minute(timetaken) & ":" & Second(timetaken)) End Sub Of course with your example ...


2

Use the Number format D#, where # determines the number of digits so for example var time =112; Console.WriteLine(string.Format("00:{0:D2}:{1:D2}", time / 60, time % 60)); will give 00:01:52


2

It's a little hard to understand exactly what you are asking, so apologies if I've misunderstood you, but I think you are asking how you can update the UI using a timer on a new thread without blocking the UI thread? The answer is that you cannot update a UI control in a thread other than the one that it was created in. Instead you have to create a delegate ...


2

Can I join a thread in a destructor to make sure it's finished? Not only you can, but it's quite typical to do so. If the thread instance is joinable (i.e. still running) when it's destroyed, terminate would be called.


2

You are loosing context this inside setTimeout. You can use Function.prototype.bind to bind callback function to proper context: $.data(this, 'timer', setTimeout(function () { $(this).stop(true, true).animate({ width: "150%" }, 270, function () {}); }.bind(this), 400)); If you care about IE8 support, use $.proxy - simple bind ...


2

after does not guarantee that it will wait exactly as long as the time you specify, so it's not suitable for precise timing applications. From the effbot documentation: This method registers a callback function that will be called after a given number of milliseconds. Tkinter only guarantees that the callback will not be called earlier than that; if the ...


2

Either remove the argument double time because you're not even using it, or rename it to something else if you're going to use it. As a side note, including the same header file (ctime/time.h) twice is probably not necessary. Use ctime if you're writing C++, or time.h for C.


1

The problem with your tests and Timer is that, in your tests you are setting the value of @timer.seconds, but the Timer#time_string does not rely on the @seconds variable set. Your time_string method is implemented the way it accepts the amount of seconds as an argument, not an attribute of Timer. Try changing your tests as follows: describe "Timer" do # ...


1

I assume by "not working" you mean the compiler isn't letting you create an instance of the inner class RemindTask2 from a static context (main method). There are generally two ways to handle this. Ask a MyTimer instance to create its inner class instance for you. This actually isn't an option for you since you need the inner class instance to exist ...


1

You can use interrupts to cancel threads. OSGi isn't any different than other applications when it comes to concurrency. The code you posted should run in its own separate thread and you need to keep a reference to that thread. When the bundle is deactivated, send an interrupt to that thread using Thread.interrupt().Your code would actually work already, ...


1

you resubscribe to the Tick event each time you start the timer. If you don't unsubscribe when the timer stops, you end up firing the event several times for each tick. Just subscribe to the Tick event once, after creating the timer event and leave it at that. So move the line timer.Tick += timer_Tick; to the part of the code where you create the timer. ...


1

If you're trying to use field injection, you're relying on the framework to come along after the object has already been instantiated and set the field, so it will always be null in the constructor. You can either do whatever logic you need in an @PostConstruct method or, my strong preference, inject the TimerService as a constructor argument instead of ...


1

Since you've called it a digestion timer, I gather you don't want the starfish to do anything for 15 ticks after it eats. If this is what you want, add a variable (say digestion) for the starfish and set it to 15 when it eats. In your go statement, ask starfish with [digestion > 0] [set digestion digestion - 1] and change your move starfish to ask ...


1

Because the tick is firing in a round about Async manner. Multiple tick executions can be occurring at the same time if a previous one hasn't completed (and it hasn't in your case because it's waiting on the MessageBox to be clicked away). That means while the message box is waiting for the "Ok" other tick events are firing (because you haven't got to the ...


1

Timer is just a Thread subclass (created by factory function named Timer) with simple run method: class _Timer(Thread): def __init__(self, interval, function, args=[], kwargs={}): Thread.__init__(self) self.interval = interval self.function = function self.args = args self.kwargs = kwargs self.finished = ...


1

You can not just "interrupt" main at some point, and run your code, after 100ms. What you can do, instead, is to run the code you are interested in after 100ms (using, say, System.Timers.Timer). After, if the reason of suspending the main thread is dependency between those at some point, in that point check for both results: main and timers and make ...


1

Is that your complete code? If yes, the controller would reset after executing sei(); since the end of the program code has been reached. The delay you see on the oscilloscope probably is the start-up and crystal setup time. Use a while(true) { asm volatile("NOP"); } construct at the end of the main. I put the volatile NOP instruction there to ...


1

I'd personally insert the button inside .basic div element (don't use id, use class instead): <div class="basic stopwatch"> <button class="get-timer" >Get milliseconds and display under this button onclick:</button> <div class=output></div> </div> And then: [EDIT] (removed alert as pointed out @mplungjan) var ...


1

Considering, that you're loading all required scripts properly, here is what I would suggest: PHP part $ends = date("Y, n-1, j", $set[ends]); //covert your time stamp to the required format **JavaScript Part ** <script type='text/javascript'> ( function( $ ) { $('#yourCountDownDIV').countdown({until: <?php echo $ends ?>}); } )( ...


1

Try out with Alarm Manager. It wakes your service at the time you want. http://developer.android.com/reference/android/app/AlarmManager.html


1

It's better to use timeSetEvent because its results are more consistent. On average modern hardware, for small intervals, the deviations in length of the intervals are about ten times smaller than when using CreateTimerQueueTimer. And that's assuming you didn't forget to increase the timer resolution before calling CreateTimerQueueTimer, otherwise the ...



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