Hot answers tagged

521

No, it's not. Use the Stopwatch (in System.Diagnostics) Stopwatch sw = Stopwatch.StartNew(); PerformWork(); sw.Stop(); Console.WriteLine("Time taken: {0}ms", sw.Elapsed.TotalMilliseconds); Stopwatch automatically checks for the existence of high-precision timers. It is worth mentioning that DateTime.Now often is quite a bit slower than DateTime.UtcNow ...


426

window.setInterval(function(){ /// call your function here }, 5000);


278

Python 2.5.2 (r252:60911, Jul 31 2008, 17:28:52) [GCC 4.2.3 (Ubuntu 4.2.3-2ubuntu7)] on linux2 Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information. >>> from time import sleep >>> sleep(0.05) >>>


269

ok since this isn't cleared up yet there are 3 simple ways to handle this. Below is an example showing all 3 and at the bottom is an example showing just the method I believe is preferable. Also remember to clean up your tasks in onPause, saving state if necessary. import java.util.Timer; import java.util.TimerTask; import android.app.Activity; import ...


246

This article offers a fairly comprehensive explanation: "Comparing the Timer Classes in the .NET Framework Class Library" - also available as a .chm file The specific difference appears to be that System.Timers.Timer is geared towards multithreaded applications and is therefore thread-safe via its SynchronizationObject property, whereas ...


239

Stopwatch is designed for this purpose and is one of the best way to measure time execution in .NET. var watch = Stopwatch.StartNew(); // the code that you want to measure comes here watch.Stop(); var elapsedMs = watch.ElapsedMilliseconds; Do not use DateTimes to measure time execution in .NET. UPDATE: As pointed out by @series0ne in the comments ...


224

Indeed rather use ExecutorService instead of Timer, here's an SSCCE: package com.stackoverflow.q2275443; import java.util.concurrent.Callable; import java.util.concurrent.ExecutorService; import java.util.concurrent.Executors; import java.util.concurrent.Future; import java.util.concurrent.TimeUnit; import java.util.concurrent.TimeoutException; public ...


200

According to Java Concurrency in Practice: Timer can be sensitive to changes in the system clock, ScheduledThreadPoolExecutor isn't. Timer has only one execution thread, so long-running task can delay other tasks. ScheduledThreadPoolExecutor can be configured with any number of threads. Furthermore, you have full control over created threads, if you want ...


194

The usual WPF timer is the DispatcherTimer, which is not a control but used in code. It basically works the same way like the WinForms timer: System.Windows.Threading.DispatcherTimer dispatcherTimer = new System.Windows.Threading.DispatcherTimer(); dispatcherTimer.Tick += dispatcherTimer_Tick; dispatcherTimer.Interval = new TimeSpan(0,0,1); ...


190

var count=30; var counter=setInterval(timer, 1000); //1000 will run it every 1 second function timer() { count=count-1; if (count <= 0) { clearInterval(counter); //counter ended, do something here return; } //Do code for showing the number of seconds here } To make the code for the timer appear in a paragraph (or anywhere ...


174

If you're just looking for extremely precise measurements of elapsed time, use System.nanoTime(). System.currentTimeMillis() will give you the most accurate possible elapsed time in milliseconds since the epoch, but System.nanoTime() gives you a nanosecond-precise time, relative to some arbitrary point. From the Java Documentation: public static long ...


158

So the first part of the answer is how to do what the subject asks as this was how I initially interpreted it and a few people seemed to find helpful. The question was since clarified and I've extended the answer to address that. Setting a timer First you need to create a Timer (I'm using the java.util version here): import java.util.Timer; .. Timer ...


127

It's possible to use HostingEnvironment.MapPath() instead of HttpContext.Current.Server.MapPath() I haven't tried it yet in a thread or timer event though. Some (non viable) solutions I considered; The only method I care about on HttpServerUtility is MapPath. So as an alternative I could use AppDomain.CurrentDomain.BaseDirectory and build my paths from ...


126

#include <sys/time.h> #include <stdio.h> #include <unistd.h> int main() { struct timeval start, end; long mtime, seconds, useconds; gettimeofday(&start, NULL); usleep(2000); gettimeofday(&end, NULL); seconds = end.tv_sec - start.tv_sec; useconds = end.tv_usec - start.tv_usec; mtime = ...


120

This is not the correct usage of the System.Threading.Timer. When you instantiate the Timer, you should almost always do the following: _timer = new Timer( Callback, null, TIME_INTERVAL_IN_MILLISECONDS, Timeout.Infinite ); This will instruct the timer to tick only once when the interval has elapsed. Then in your Callback function you Change the timer once ...


119

It depends. The System.Timers.Timer has two modes of operation. If SynchronizingObject is set to an ISynchronizeInvoke instance then the Elapsed event will execute on the thread hosting the synchronizing object. Usually these ISynchronizeInvoke instances are none other than plain old Control and Form instances that we are all familiar with. So in that ...


118

Both System.Timers.Timer and System.Threading.Timer will work for services. The timers you want to avoid are System.Web.UI.Timer and System.Windows.Forms.Timer, which are respectively for ASP applications and WinForms. Using those will cause the service to load an additional assembly which is not really needed for the type of application you are building. ...


111

#include <iostream> #include <cstdio> #include <ctime> int main() { std::clock_t start; double duration; start = std::clock(); /* Your algorithm here */ duration = ( std::clock() - start ) / (double) CLOCKS_PER_SEC; std::cout<<"printf: "<< duration <<'\n'; }


109

Updated answer for an old question: In C++11 you can portably get to the highest resolution timer with: #include <iostream> #include <chrono> #include "chrono_io" int main() { typedef std::chrono::high_resolution_clock Clock; auto t1 = Clock::now(); auto t2 = Clock::now(); std::cout << t2-t1 << '\n'; } Example ...


105

You need to declare "timer" outside the function. Otherwise, you get a brand new variable on each function invocation. var timer; function endAndStartTimer() { window.clearTimeout(timer); //var millisecBeforeRedirect = 10000; timer = window.setTimeout(function(){alert('Hello!');},10000); }


104

#include <windows.h> double PCFreq = 0.0; __int64 CounterStart = 0; void StartCounter() { LARGE_INTEGER li; if(!QueryPerformanceFrequency(&li)) cout << "QueryPerformanceFrequency failed!\n"; PCFreq = double(li.QuadPart)/1000.0; QueryPerformanceCounter(&li); CounterStart = li.QuadPart; } double GetCounter() { ...


104

I ended up creating my own plugin. Here it is in case this helps anyone: (function($) { $.fn.countTo = function(options) { // merge the default plugin settings with the custom options options = $.extend({}, $.fn.countTo.defaults, options || {}); // how many times to update the value, and how much to increment the value on ...


104

I have two demos, one with jQuery and one without. Neither use date functions and are about as simple as it gets. Demo with vanilla JavaScript function startTimer(duration, display) { var timer = duration, minutes, seconds; setInterval(function () { minutes = parseInt(timer / 60, 10); seconds = parseInt(timer % 60, 10); ...


92

In his book "CLR Via C#", Jeff Ritcher discourages using System.Timers.Timer, this timer is derived from System.ComponentModel.Component, allowing it to be used in design surface of Visual Studio. So that it would be only useful if you want a timer on a design surface. He prefers to use System.Threading.Timer for background tasks on a thread pool thread.


86

I wrote this script some time ago: Usage: var myCounter = new Countdown({ seconds:5, // number of seconds to count down onUpdateStatus: function(sec){console.log(sec);}, // callback for each second onCounterEnd: function(){ alert('counter ended!');} // final action }); myCounter.start(); function Countdown(options) { var timer, ...


85

I think this should work: #include <time.h> clock_t start = clock(), diff; ProcessIntenseFunction(); diff = clock() - start; int msec = diff * 1000 / CLOCKS_PER_SEC; printf("Time taken %d seconds %d milliseconds", msec/1000, msec%1000);


84

Don't use NSTimer that way. NSTimer is normally used to fire a selector at some time interval. It isn't high precision and isn't suited to what you want to do. What you want is a High resolution timer class (using NSDate): Output: Total time was: 0.002027 milliseconds Total time was: 0.000002 seconds Total time was: 0.000000 minutes Main: Timer *timer ...


83

System.Threading.Timer is a plain timer. It calls you back on a thread pool thread (from the worker pool). System.Timers.Timer is a System.ComponentModel.Component that wraps a System.Threading.Timer, and provides some additional features used for dispatching on a particular thread. System.Windows.Forms.Timer instead wraps a native message-only-HWND and ...


82

The link that Anne provided was a great starting point, but, being the n00b that I am, it was difficult to translate into my existing project. I found this blog that gave a better step-by-step, but it wasn't written for XCode 4.2 and using storyboards. Here is a write up of how I got the inactivity timer to work for my app: Create a new file -> Objective-C ...


81

I always do ... myTimer.Stop(); myTimer.Start(); ... is that a hack? :) Per comment, on Threading.Timer, it's the Change method ... dueTime Type: System.Int32 The amount of time to delay before the invoking the callback method specified when the Timer was constructed, in milliseconds. Specify Timeout.Infinite to prevent the timer from ...



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