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4

The epochs of the chrono clocks are unspecified. But practically you can think of the chrono clocks this way: The epoch of steady_clock is the time your application launched plus a signed random offset. I.e. you can't depend upon the epoch being the same across application launches. But the epoch will remain stable while an application is running. The ...


3

In Oracle, if you want a timestamp as the result, rather than a date (a date always includes the time to the second, though, so you may just want a date), you'd want to add an interval to the timestamp. There are various ways to construct an interval-- you can use an interval literal select current_timestamp + interval '10' second from dual or you ...


3

You may use time module: import time >>>print(time.mktime(time.strptime("13.07.2015 09:38:17", "%d.%m.%Y %H:%M:%S"))) 1436769497.0


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Note there is currently a bug in the framework that prevents the first solution from working. I will keep this post up to date if it get's fixed. Github issue You can pass an options array to save() and disable timestamps for that one save: $model->save(['timestamps' => false]); Of course you could also set the property on the model, but this ...


2

Timestamp is method for row versioning. It is automatically generated. But datetime is a datatype. So use datetime instead of timestamp. create table user3(uname varchar(50) primary key,email varchar(50),doj datetime);


2

Your call to date_create_from_format includes an A at the end of the format string - that looks specious to me, given that your value doesn't end with am or pm. Your use of h looks unlikely to be correct too, as that's for a 12-hour hour-of-day, which isn't useful when you don't have an am/pm indicator. I suspect you want a format of Y-m-d H:i:s That ...


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Oracle has a non-standard format for date. You can use that format (DD/MMM/YYYY), use the to_date() function, or the DATE/TIMESTAMP operator. I think this will work: INSERT INTO TOY_STORE (TOY_STORE_ID,T OY_STORE_NAME, CITY,PHONENUMBER, STORE_OPENING_TIME, STORE_CLOSING_TIME) VALUES(1, 'Kid''s Cave',' Delhi', 9912312312, ...


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You can disable the timestamps temporarily by doing this before save. $model->timestamps = false;


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The example in the Books Online is incorrect. I see that was called out in the community comments for the topic. The code below shows how one might use rowversion to implement optimistic concurrency. This method is often employed when data are presented to the user for update and then modified. DECLARE @MyKey int = 1 ,@NewMyValue int = 1 ...


1

the following code works. But no data validation done (eg: old>new) <?php $olddate = "25-08-2015 15:35:28"; //date as string $now = time(); //pick present time from server $old = strtotime( $olddate); //create integer value of old time $diff = $now-$old; //calculate difference $old = new DateTime($olddate); $old ...


1

The default string representation of a TimeSpan is [-][d.]hh:mm:ss[.fffffff] when using TimeSpan.ToString(). You can specify your own format with TimeSpan.ToString(string format), but it should be noted that the hour formatter will not include hours that are included in the day portion. If you want a hh:mm:ss format where the hours can go over 24 then you ...


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This is a quite simple way to do it here var startTime1 = DateTime.Now.ToString(); var endTime1 = DateTime.Now.ToString(); TimeSpan duration = DateTime.Parse(endTime1).Subtract(DateTime.Parse(startTime1)); var formattedTimeSpan = duration.ToString(@"hh\ \:\ mm\ \:\ ss\ \:\ fff");


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Probably because CURRENT_TIMESTAMP is not a DATE, but rather a TIMESTAMP. (however I am not that familiar with MySQL; I work mainly in PostgreSQL)


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Use datetime with a default value: create table user3 ( uname varchar(50) primary key, email varchar(50), doj datetime default getdate() ); When you insert a new row into the table -- with no value for doj -- then it will get set automatically. I usually called this column CreatedAt.


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As @Richard Scriven points out in the comments, you need to use a lowercase 'y' because your original date has a two-digit century component: > as.POSIXct(temp$Time, format="%d/%m/%y %H:%M:%S") [1] "2015-05-28 10:33:54 AEST" The uppercase 'Y' is used when the date has a four-digit century component. The full list of the format specifiers you can use is ...



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