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You'll get your desired result by using this method: var timezoneObject = TimeZoneInfo.GetSystemTimeZones().FirstOrDefault(x=> x.Id == "UTC"); Ouput: timezoneObject.Id : UTC timezoneObject.DisplayName :(UTC) Coordinated Universal Time timezoneObject.StandardName: Coordinated Universal Time timezoneObject.DaylightName: Coordinated Universal Time From ...


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Just convert the server time to UTC time, then convert to local country time. Just write a separate method for this +(NSString*)convertLocaleTimeToChatTimeStampWithDateStr:(NSString *)strDate { NSDateFormatter *df = [DateHelper getDefaultTimeFormatter]; [df setDateFormat:@"yyyy-MM-dd'T'HH:mm:ss'Z'"]; [df setTimeZone:[NSTimeZone timeZoneWithAbbreviation:@"...


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Suppose you have two DateTime objects that represent the same Instant in time but in different time zones. DateTime dt1 = DateTime.Now.AddHours(3); DateTime dt2 = dt1.AddHours(3); // change kind to unspecified dt1 = new DateTime(dt1.Ticks, DateTimeKind.Unspecified); dt2 = new DateTime(dt2.Ticks, DateTimeKind.Unspecified); // append the offset for each ...


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See this answer: Source If timezone is not specified in postgresql.conf or as a server command-line option, the server attempts to use the value of the TZ environment variable as the default time zone. If TZ is not defined or is not any of the time zone names known to PostgreSQL, the server attempts to determine the operating system's default time zone ...


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The date string, when parsed into a javascript Date object, does not retain the original time zone information because javascript Date object does not have time zone information, so the conversion to standard javascript Dates can't be lossless. Also, basically, the three "time zones" (DateTimeKind) .NET provides are a joke - there are around 100 distinct ...


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If the date is a string and always "YYYY-MM-DD", I would do something like this: https://fiddle.jshell.net/Twisty/eknxxqvh/ $(function() { var dString = "2016-04-28"; var yy = parseInt(dString.substring(0, 4)); var mm = parseInt(dString.substring(5, 7)) - 1; var dd = parseInt(dString.substring(8)); $("#thePicker").datepicker({ dateFormat: 'yy-...


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In your case, the only real key that you didn't mention is that you have a range index with full precision (-1) on the ISO-8601 strings. Some other general guidelines: Store all events in canonical form: 2016-07-18T01:23:45.678Z Store everything in zulu/GMT time. End every string with a Z. Never store it with +03:00. Make sure you shift local time input ...


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In general, you'll have to be careful about mapping time zone abbreviations to time zone identifiers. There's not a one-to-one mapping. For example, CST could be Central Standard Time, China Standard Time, or Cuba Standard Time. Since you have both an offset and an abbreviation, you might be able to refine it a bit further, but you'll still have ...


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Remember that NSDate is internally represented as some value relative to a UTC date in the past. Having this fixed reference point makes NSDate timezone independent, allowing you to compare NSDates with NSDates without having to worry about timezones. So, the key thing for everything else to work is to create NSDates properly. See this or this for ...


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You should not convert the date object and plain get date.hoursUTC.



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