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17

I encountered exactly this issue. The solution I found was to use version 3.5 of tlbimp from the .Net Framework SDK (or Windows Platform SDK?) located in %ProgramFiles%\Microsoft SDKs\Windows\v6.0A\bin that used CLR 2. I also found I needed this info to get the correct type library from the exe file i was importing, as VS would use only the first type ...


8

The solution to the problem for me was to force tlbimp.exe to run under specific .NET runtime version. Go to C:\Program Files (x86)Microsoft SDKs\Windows\v7.0A\Bin and open the tlbimp.exe.config file. Add the following lines to the file in the configuration section: <startup> <supportedRuntime version="v2.0.50727"/> </startup> Save ...


7

Oh... found it after looking at the folder where TLBIMP belongs. It's called AxImp. C:\Program Files\Microsoft SDKs\Windows\v6.0A\bin\AxImp.exe So basically, to generate a PIA DLL in your own customized namespace: Register your OCX regsvr32 abc.ocx Generate a strong name key pair for you ocx by running sn -k Run TLBIMP and specify the desired ...


7

There are two kinds of COM. The original kind, dating from the early nineties, targeted to make interop work in C or C++ and originated by the Office sub-group at Microsoft. And the later kind, a subset of COM originally named OLE Automation. Developed by the Visual Basic team in the DivDev sub-group when they looked for an alternative for VBX, a 16-bit ...


5

Tlbimp.exe can handle a type library resource inside an EXE just fine. For example: C:\temp\temp>tlbimp c:\windows\system32\wiaacmgr.exe Microsoft (R) .NET Framework Type Library to Assembly Converter 3.5.30729.1 Copyright (C) Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved. Type library imported to WIAACMGRLib.dll Automating this is fairly risky btw. A ...


5

According to a comment in the MDSN article about TLBIMP for 2.0, you can't fix this problem w/o running TLBIMP yourself. It was easy to reproduce your problem using VS. I also reproduced it running TLBIMP manually from a VS comment prompt: tlbimp c:\WINNT\system32\activeds.tlb /out:interop.activeds.dll The fix was to use the /silent switch tlbimp ...


5

you should have a look at Type Library Importer (Tlbimp.exe)


5

It is not a constructor call. The sHost variable contains the name of a machine, the one that provides the out-of-process COM server. The equivalent functionality is provided by Type.GetTypeFromProgId(), using the overload that allows specifying the server name: var t = Type.GetTypeFromProgID("Exfo.IcSCPIActiveX.IcSCPIAccess", sHost, true); obj = ...


4

unless the COM library is constantly changing it's COM interfaces you could run the typelib importer once and then refer to the interop assembly in your project from then on. If you have reg free COM all that's needed is that the COM library be copied into your build output folder.


4

You need to install the COM object on the other machine surely? The error getting returned means the class isn't registered. tlbimp just creates a wrapper assembly to map the COM interface into .NET, it does not convert the COM object itself and does not carry it with it. Take the VB6 COM object DLL (or .OCX), put it on the other machine and run regsvr32 ...


4

It is possible, but you'll need to set your Visual Studio debugger to mixed mode in project properties. This is located under Project properties->Configuration Properties->Debugging->Debugger Type


4

You got the names wrong, that doesn't help understanding what's going on. The Bar coclass in the type library generates a Bar interface and a BarClass class, there is no "FooBar". This is just extra glue that the type library auto-generates to make porting code easier. Particularly important for VB6 code, it took lots liberties with the COM object model. ...


3

In the end we found a couple of links about a project called tlbimp2 on codeplex, and compiled our own modified version of tlbimp2: http://clrinterop.codeplex.com/discussions/208832 http://clrinterop.codeplex.com/SourceControl/changeset/view/39798 I took the code from the tlbimp project of 2. and modified it along the lines of 1. There were a couple of ...


3

Well, here's the way the problem was solved. .NET seems to load TLB to build new apartment for each ASP.NET thread (everything happens when new thread first time tries to access some COM interface). It seems to use CoMarshalInterThreadInterfaceInStream and CoGetInterfaceAndReleaseStream functions for this purpose. I'm not able to prove that, but calling ...


3

I'm not so sure it is going to be useful to you, but the source code for a managed version of Tlbimp.exe has been released on CodePlex. VS2010 will definitely solve your problem.


3

I have no idea why someone downvoted this question. It seems a perfectly valid question to me; maybe they just haven't had their coffee yet this morning. You seem to be asking what GUIDs, IUnknown and IDispatch have to do with COM. I will try to give a brief survey. Every COM component exposes a common interface, IUnknown. IUnknown has the methods ...


3

Well, to answer my own question for the sake of anyone else who may find themselves in this situation: First, you need to put your public/private key into a 'container'. sn.exe can do this for you: sn.exe -i MySpecial.pfx MagicContainerName Then you can use tlbimp.exe like so: tlbimp.exe MyActiveX.dll /out:MyActiveX.Interop.dll ...


3

There are three methods of distributing a type library: either separately in a .tlb file, or as an embedded resource inside a .dll or .exe file. However, it is not mandatory to distribute a type library file with a COM component. Usually the there would be a TypeLib registry key underneath the HKCR\CLSID{CLSID}, which would have a default value containing ...


3

Tom: When adding the reference, use the Browse option to find EXTRACOM.dll (not EXTRACOM.tlb) in Reflection's installation directory. Note that if you're using the latest Reflection, adding the reference will require using ".NET Framework 4" as your Target. You'll want to change your project's Target first and then add the reference (if you add the ...


3

First off, unlike a C++ compiler or the many other compilers that can read type libraries, neither the CLR nor .NET compilers actually read a type library. They both depend on an interop library, a .NET assembly that's generated from a type library. It only contains declarations, decompiled from the tlb, in a format that both the CLR and the compilers can ...


2

I came across your post looking for the same thing, but found a different route on my own to get around the issue of strong naming a COM Interop referenced assembly. You can sign the imported type library assembly with the key file before you reference it in Visual Studio by using the /keyfile:<key.snk> parameter: tlbimp MyCOMService.tlb ...


2

If it is working on one machine and not on the other, then most probably some dependency of this DLL is missing in your machine. Inspect the dll through DependencyWalker and you will get to know that which dependency hasn't been built properly.


2

I ended up using the BeforeBuild target to explicitly invoke tlbimp.exe: <Target Name="BeforeBuild"> <Exec Command="tlbimp /silent ..\3rdparty\comlibrary.dll /out:..\bin\interop.comlibrary.dll" /> </Target> This does require referencing the interop.comlibrary.dll binary, resulting in a little yellow warning sign on the reference ...


2

I found the solution myself. To replicate the settings that Visual Studio uses with tlbimp you simply need to use the /out and /namespace flags. The out flag is used to prefix "Interop." on the generated file and the namespace flag is used to set the default namespace to the name of the COM assembly. e.g. tlbimp /out:Interop.MyCom.dll /namespace:MyCom ...


2

As I originally suspected the best solution is going with ILMerge. I can't be selective about parts of a COM API to embed, but it works well enough. Here is the Post Build Event Command Line I'm using, which should be easy enough to reuse: set MERGEFILES=Interop.Foo.dll Interop.Bar.dll if "$(ConfigurationName)" == "Release" ( ren "$(TargetFileName)" ...


2

This won't help you out today, but there is a feature coming in the next version of C#. It's called NoPia or Type Embedding depending on which presentation you read. This feature essentially will link a PIA assembly into whatever project you reference it from. The end resulrt is a single EXE which no need to deploy an interop/PIA DLL. Misha's post on ...


2

You can create a VB macros in word\excel\etc: Dim obj As Object Set obj = CreateObject("progid here") Call obj.SomeMethodForTest()


2

there is a little more to it, you also need to use the /sysarray option otherwise you will find your app will randomly crash with supposed EngineExceptions citing memory corruption. This will give you identical ilcode to that generated by visual studio. specify the /namespace parameter to match (including case) the library clause in the tlb file. (can use ...


2

Your understanding of the generated Interop DLL is pretty much correct - it basically contains a bunch of metadata that describes the COM DLL in terms that .NET can understand. The original XYZ assembly is called, so must be registered on the target system. For the second question, your application should still work provided the COM DLL supports the same ...


2

wuapi.dll has an OS dependency so the interop library does as well. Judging from the interface names there may be 6 versions of it out there. I see IUpdate through IUpdate5 for example on Win7. Trying to use a newer interface is liable to fail if you're running on an old version of Windows. Which interface is available on what version of Windows isn't ...



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