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You can't bind multiple character combinations to perform an action in tmux (at least not up to current version 2.0). That means binding space + w won't work. If the above holds true, you might wonder how come ctrl key combinations work, for example Ctrl-b? The reason for this is that Ctrl-b is a single character, even though 2 keyboard keys are required ...


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Old question. But in case someone find his way here. This is sgzmd's answer: Edit your ~/.tmux.conf and add lines: set-window-option -g xterm-keys on If you don’t want to make it permanent just yet, do: C-b :set-window-option xterm-keys on Reload your config in tmux by doing: C-b :source-file ~/.tmux.conf It worked for me. original answer here


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Try removing all sessions before running tmux. I have noticed that if you have sessions still running, tmux will still load the previous .tmux.config file.


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It might have to do with where you open the tmux (virtual terminal versus GNOME terminal) when you initially run the command tmux to initiate the session manager. It's good to echo $DISPLAY in the terminal and Sys.getenv("DISPLAY") in R. See stuff like http://unix.stackexchange.com/questions/31283/error-in-r-unable-to-open-connection-to-x11 You can also ...


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Options mode-mouse, mouse-select-pane, mouse-resize-pane, mouse-select-window seem to be deprecated. Use mouse option instead, it covers all the functionality of those four options: set -g mouse on


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You should be able to explicitly set tmux’s choice of $TERM in your ~/.tmux.conf: set -g default-terminal "uxterm"


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The install script of fzf will setup such key bindings for you, CTRL-T, CTRL-R, and ALT-C. Refer to the the project home page for the details. The code for the key bindings can be found here. If you do not like the default ones fzf provides, you can try writing your own. # A simple widget for dictionary words fzf-dict-widget() { LBUFFER="$LBUFFER$(cat ...


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I finally got the solution from this answer of another SO question: http://superuser.com/a/562423/243529


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In ~/.tmux.conf: set -g visual-activity off Right now you have this set to on, which is why you see Activity in window N.


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When I removed some sessions/windows this error went away for me. Apparently I had too many TTY's open. You can kill sessions/windows from outside tmux with these commands: tmux kill-session -t <session-name> tmux kill-window -t <session-name>:<window-name>


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you can only set style with comma separated values like "fg=xxx,bg=xxx,bold" what you were trying to do is FORMATS value. – Kent


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If you want to use control-semicolon, you can try AutoHotkey. This is my tmux & autohotkey settings. Tmux: set-option -g prefix 'C-\' AutoHotkey: ^;:: Send ^{\} return


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That is the Tmux session name. You can rename it using: CTRL + B, $ or CTRL + B, : To list the sessions, do CTRL + B, : and write ls or CTRL + B, s. By default, the session number is displayed.


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It's the tmux session name. That indicates you have three tmux sessions opened. You can attach a terminal to a session using: tmux attach Edit Active sessions can be discovered using: tmux list-sessions To close propperly a session: tmux kill-session <session_name>


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Use <prefix>+m toggle mouse mode on or off bind m run "if [[ `tmux show-option -w | grep mode-mouse.*on` ]]; then toggle=off; else toggle=on; fi; tmux display-message \"mouse tmux: \$toggle\"; tmux set-option -w mode-mouse \$toggle &> /dev/null; for cmd in mouse-select-pane mouse-resize-pane mouse-select-window; do tmux set-option -g \$cmd ...


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I found a way to achieve that: hold the option key when double clicking.


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As of OS X 10.11 (Beta) El Capitan, neither SIMBL or MouseTerm is needed. I had the same question, but you answered it in the OP: set -g mode-mouse on setw -g mode-mouse on set -g terminal-overrides 'xterm*:smcup@:rmcup@' is all that is needed in 10.11 with Terminal.app - note other terminal emulators may still need SIMBL; it's an update to Terminal that ...


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Great answers here, but I still couldn't get it to work the way I wanted it, which is: 1) Change the TMUX window name on opening vim 2) On quit. return it to the previous name when finished I achieved it with the following 3 vimrc lines: autocmd BufReadPost,FileReadPost,BufNewFile * call system("tmux rename-window " . expand("%:t")) let tmuxtitle = ...


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This is because Tmux does not have the root access to your system. It opens Sublime for you but it doesn't show you the system files content. You need to give it permission first.


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I needed vim to display correctly with tmux in terminal on ubuntu and cygwin/mintty on windows. I got it to work by combining the answers like this. In .bashrc: alias tmux="tmux -2" In .vimrc: " use 256 colors in terminal if !has("gui_running") set t_Co=256 set term=screen-256color endif " fix cursor display in cygwin if has("win32unix") ...


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This thread is a few years old but is still the one that comes up as the best search result, so I'm answering with what finally worked for me. This is based off of http://tmux.svn.sourceforge.net/viewvc/tmux/trunk/FAQ ...but the instructions aren't completely clear on when or where to substitute the -256color string. I use gnome-terminal (v 3.16.2) with ...


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Spacemacs, particularly the develop branch should just work right out of box without the delay. However, I have found that this delay happens when I am running emacs inside of tmux. You should see if you are trying to run this inside tmux or screen, and if you are, see if this problem happens when you run emacs directly inside a terminal, without a terminal ...


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read -p "» " choice is bash syntax for displaying a prompt before waiting for user input. In zsh, the equivalent is read 'choice?» ' (That is, one word consisting of the variable name and the prompt joined by a ?. The whole thing is quoted, although really only the ? needs to be to prevent zsh from interpreting the word as a pattern.)


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This is most likely due to wrong TERM environment variable value. Tmux is pretty explicit this should be either screen or screen-256color. You can first check what you currently have by typing inside tmux echo $TERM. The usual fix is to add this line to .tmux.conf: set -g default-terminal "screen-256color" Restarting tmux is recommended after this. Now, ...


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I use a .tmux.conf file with something similar to the following, which I adapted to your question # Set tmux to Vi mode set-window-option -g mode-keys vi # Scroll up/down with j/k bind-key -t vi-copy 'j' page-up bind-key -t vi-copy 'k' page-down Although this seems unnecessary because in vi mode, the hjkl work as expected, and you scroll up/down with J/K ...


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Setting status-right Quoting with shell command #( ) in tmux Quoting is complex in tmux #( ) because the contents are evaluated twice. For this reason let's simplify the gawk program to: sensors | awk '/^Physical id 0:/ { sub(/^+/, "", $4); print $4; exit }' Now we plug it into .tmux.conf: set-option -g status-right "#( sensors | awk \\' /Physical id ...


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From the tmux man page, adding flag as following: tmux -2 This works for me


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Building on the answer by chepner, if you are inside tmux then this works new-session ; run-shell "tmux rename-session $(echo testsession)" You can bind this command to a key, say N, for ease like below bind N new-session -s "startname" \; run-shell "tmux rename-session $(echo testsession)>/dev/null" Replace 'echo testsession' with your command. ...



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