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114

SQL Developer will look in the following location in this order for a tnsnames.ora file $HOME/.tnsnames.ora $TNS_ADMIN/tnsnames.ora TNS_ADMIN lookup key in the registry /etc/tnsnames.ora ( non-windows ) $ORACLE_HOME/network/admin/tnsnames.ora LocalMachine\SOFTWARE\ORACLE\ORACLE_HOME_KEY LocalMachine\SOFTWARE\ORACLE\ORACLE_HOME If your tnsnames.ora file ...


84

In SQLDeveloper browse Tools --> Preferences, as shown in below image. In the Preferences options expand Database --> select Advanced --> under "Tnsnames Directory" --> Browse the directory where tnsnames.ora present. Then click on Ok, as shown in below diagram. tnsnames.ora available at Drive:\oracle\product\10x.x.x\client_x\NETWORK\ADMIN ...


52

Oracle provides a utility called tnsping: R:\>tnsping someconnection TNS Ping Utility for 32-bit Windows: Version 9.0.1.3.1 - Production on 27-AUG-20 08 10:38:07 Copyright (c) 1997 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved. Used parameter files: C:\Oracle92\network\ADMIN\sqlnet.ora C:\Oracle92\network\ADMIN\tnsnames.ora TNS-03505: Failed to resolve ...


22

Open SQL Developer. Go to Tools -> Preferences -> Databases -> Advanced Then explicitly set the Tnsnames Directory My TNSNAMES was set up correctly and I could connect to Toad, SQL*Plus etc. but I needed to do this to get SQL Developer to work. Perhaps it was a Win 7 issue as it was a pain to install too.


21

You need to add the SID entry for XE in order to register the instance with the listener. After installation of Oracle XE, everything looks good, but when you issue C:\>sqlplus / as sysdba SQL>shutdown immediate SQL>startup TNS-12505: TNS:listener does not currently know of SID given in connect descriptor the instance will not register with ...


12

This excellent answer to a similar question (that I could not find before, unfortunately) helped me solve the problem.


11

You can always find out the location of the tnsnames.ora file being used by running TNSPING to check connectivity (9i or later): C:\>tnsping dev TNS Ping Utility for 32-bit Windows: Version 10.2.0.1.0 - Production on 08-JAN-2009 12:48:38 Copyright (c) 1997, 2005, Oracle. All rights reserved. Used parameter files: ...


10

The order of precedence for resolving TNS names in ODP.NET, Managed Driver is this (see here): data source alias in the 'dataSources' section under section in the .NET config file. data source alias in the tnsnames.ora file at the location specified by 'TNS_ADMIN' in the .NET config file. data source alias in the tnsnames.ora file present in the same ...


8

For linux: $ strace sqlplus -L scott/tiger@orcl 2>&1| grep -i 'open.*tnsnames.ora' shows something like this: open("/opt/oracle/product/10.2.0/db_1/network/admin/tnsnames.ora",O_RDONLY)=7 Changing to $ strace sqlplus -L scott/tiger@orcl 2>&1| grep -i 'tnsnames.ora' will show all the file paths that are failing.


8

You can use the TNS_ADMIN environment variable to specify a custom location of TNSNAMES.ORA file. Check this wiki: http://www.orafaq.com/wiki/TNS_ADMIN


8

In SQLDeveloper browse Tools --> Preferences, as shown in below image. In the Preferences options expand Database --> select Advanced --> under "Tnsnames Directory" --> Browse the directory where tnsnames.ora present.Then click on Ok. as shown in below diagram. You have Done! Now you can connect via the TNSnames options.


8

The answer was simply moving the PLSQL Developer folder from the "Program Files (x86) into the "Program Files" folder - weird!


7

The TNS alias in the tnsnames.ora file interacts with the parameter NAMES.DEFAULT_DOMAIN in the sqlnet.ora file. If NAMES.DEFAULT_DOMAIN is set to WORLD, for example, then when you try to connect to an alias without a domain, the sqlnet.ora file tells Oracle to automatically append the domain before doing the lookup in the tnsnames.ora file. If you try ...


7

You may be able to specify it all on the command line with a Connection String instead of a TNSName. Remove the whitespace from your TNS entry you would have used to connect, here is an example that works with SQLPLUS... Here is how to connect to a local OracleXE install on Windows: sqlplus ...


7

this worked for me - I did all of the above then changed: jdbc.databaseurl=jdbc:oracle:thin:@localhost:1521:xe to: jdbc.databaseurl=jdbc:oracle:thin:@localhost:1521/xe


6

A TNS name is like an alias to your service instance. The TNS listener service acts as a sort of lookup service for you in this regard. It will fail with that error message if the actual service you're trying to connect to via a TNS name isn't valid. You can then test out to see if the TNS listener sees the service correctly using the command line tool: ...


6

There is another place where the TNS location is stored: If you're using Windows, open regedit and navigate to My HKEY Local Machine/Software/ORACLE/KEY_OraClient10_home1 where KEY_OraClient10_home1 is your Oracle home. If there is a string entry called TNS_ADMIN, then the value of that entry will point to the TNS file that Oracle is using on your computer.


4

You can provide the whole TNS string as the connection parameter: sqlplus "scott/tiger@(DESCRIPTION=(ADDRESS_LIST=(ADDRESS=(PROTOCOL=TCP)(HOST=127.0.0.1)(PORT=1521)))(CONNECT_DATA=(SERVICE_NAME=MYSERVICE)))" Alternatively, if your client supports EasyConnect syntax, you can go just this: sqlplus scott/tiger@//127.0.0.1/MYSERVICE


4

On my development machine I have three different versions of Oracle client software. I manage the tnsnames.ora file in one of them. In the other two, I have entered in the tnsnames.ora file: ifile=path_to_tnsnames.ora_file/tnsnames.ora This way, if for some reason the wrong tnsnames.ora file is used by a client, it will always end up at the up-to-date ...


4

Generic Connectivity is what you are after, it will let you setup a remote database link against MS SQL Server, so you can do queries like select * from mytable@my_ms_sql_server; I've only used it in Oracle 9i against mysql, and found, that in our cases, it didn't work very well, as it ended up using up MASSIVE amounts of ram, we still use it, but now ...


3

Can you ping ud06 successfully (as ud06, not ud06.us.server.com)? What does the command lsnrctl services show? EDIT: It sounds to me like maybe the database instance name isn't actually "orcl"? What the lsnrctl services output tells me is that the "orcl" service, although defined in the listener.ora file, is not actually running. Can you log on with a ...


3

First of all, you will need the syntax rules for this file. There is probably a hack for this, but I would personally go with a full parser, like ANTLR combined with the proper grammar (a complete list of ANTLR grammars can be found here).


3

I think you need to configure a single service with multiple addresses. Then you have to set your datasource URL string to something like this (without the newlines of course): jdbc:oracle:thin@(DESCRIPTION= (LOAD_BALANCE=on) (ADDRESS=(PROTOCOL=TCP)(HOST=someServerName1) (PORT=1521)) (ADDRESS=(PROTOCOL=TCP)(HOST=someServerName2) (PORT=1521)) ...


3

It was grabbing an old copy of tnsnames.ora_OLD that I had in the same folder. According to: http://forums.oracle.com/forums/thread.jspa?threadID=1017751 "There is a longstanding feature with SQL Developer's TNS Names functionality where SQL Developer will find all of the matching tnsnames.ora* files in the TNS Admin directory and list the contents of all ...


3

To get the datasource or any other information contained inside of the TNS_NAMES.ora file you must parse this file. So first read the Syntax Rules for this file from here and here, and then you can use the most common approach to parse these files, which is use regular expressions. Unfortunally the Delphi 2010 RTL doesn't include support for regular ...


3

I had the same problem, tnsnames.ora worked fine for all other tools but SQL Developer would not use it. I tried all the suggestions on the web I could find, including the solutions on the link provided here. Nothing worked. It turns out that the database was caching backup copies of tnsnames.ora like tnsnames.ora.bk2, tnsnames09042811AM4501.bak, ...


3

We just figured out that the following syntax works: jdbc:macromedia:oracle:TNSNamesFile=C:\\Oracle\\product\\11.2.0\\client_1\\network\\admin\\tnsnames.ora; TNSServerName=tnsentry


3

You can set the TNS_ADMIN environment variable programmatically. See this page for a step by step. That is if you wanted to change to a specific TNS_NAMES.ORA file. The Oracle Client must still be installed on the client machine. From ConnectionStrings - without using TNS: Data ...


3

What you're seeing is due to the fundamental difference in how SQL Server and Oracle databases announce themselves. SQL Server (at least 2000 and 2005) use the SQL Browser Service to advertise databases available on the network. Oracle, on the other hand, requires you to explicitly enumerate instances available using TNS entries. This is an instance of When ...


3

The TNS alias database2 would need to be in the source database's tnsnames.ora file (assuming that the source database is using local naming). When you talk about both service names existing in "the tnsnames.ora," I'm wagering that you are talking about your client's tnsnames.ora file. A database link is a database object-- it exists only on the database ...



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