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24

It's equivalent to a 'U', but CVS figured that sending a patch rather than the whole updated file would be smaller. I couldn't quickly find a fuller explanation, but here's a table of codes.


21

Use cvs -d/cvsroot checkout -d directory project/path/directory. The first -d can be omitted if you set the root with the environment. This is called "shortening the path" and can be avoided with the -N option to checkout.


18

They both can be used together with no (ok, almost no) problems. One problem you might experience is that some of the overlay icons won't show up anymore. This is because Windows has only about 12 slots available for overlay icons, and with both TortoiseSVN and TortoiseCVS installed, they together use more than the 12 available slots. See this FAQ entry ...


14

As a coder, I am mostly interested in commit changes, (as opposed to tagging, branching, etc), so I usually include the -c commit option as well: cvs history -c -u username


11

Try also to repair the installation, if you upgraded from 1.6.8 or 1.6.9. Just re-launch the TortoisSVN installer and choose "Repair". There are known problems with overlay icons and TortoiseSVN upgrades (see this blog post).


10

cvs history -u username gives a history of changes the user has made


7

Are you sure this is a problem with plink? It sounds to me like you have CVS/Root files lying around that still point to the old cvs ip address. In general, CVS doesn't make changing repositories into a fun process. Since you are using Windows, if you install WinCVS with macros support (Python module loaded) it has a macro that can be used to mass change ...


6

I know many people who required a gentle introduction to cvs and ended up using WinCVS with no real difficulty. I know many others who are using the cvs client in Eclipse. This usage includes projects which are not otherwise managed by Eclipse. As for myself, I stick to the command-line myself because I feel the lack of GUI abstractions helps me to always ...


6

Based on the information that I found in http://blog.gmane.org/gmane.comp.version-control.cvs.tortoisecvs.user/month=20080701/page=2 http://customer.march-hare.com/webtools/bugzilla/ttshow_bug.cgi?tt=1&id=4918 and http://www.cvsnt.org/pipermail/cvsnt/2007-March/028600.html You can solve this problem if you change the line extssh = ...


5

The lock file is being created in /var/lock/cvs/foo/ you should check the permissions of that directory.


5

1 - Check If Your TortoiseSVN Settings are Correct Right-Click in an SVN Folder >> TortoiseSVN >> Settings Select Icon Overlays: 1. Status Cache to Default 2. Drive Types: (SELECT) Network Drive, Fixed Drive 2 - Find out if there are too many Icon Sets installed in Windows Window allows up to 11 IconSets, if other programs like DropBox are installed ...


5

According to various sources, P refers to a file patched individually rather than updated (U). See http://www.gjt.org/mlist/jcvs/msg01480.html and a bunch of others except I'm a new user so I can only post one link :-( for details. I couldn't find any docs specifically for Tortoise CVS that explained this though.


4

They can be used without any problem on the same machine. Even in the same folders if you want...


4

RigthClick on a file or folder go in CVS subMenu, select [Command...] type [log] (without brace + press Enter) wait a little and the log will apear


3

If you have checked out your code onto a network, or removable drive, you need to set some preferences to see the icons.


3

If you are on a 64-bit OS, and Unreal Commander is a 32-bit app, make sure you install the 32-bit version of Tortoise SVN in addition to the 64-bit one. You need to install both versions if you are going to use both types of app with it. (You always need the 64-bit version, at least if you want it to work with Windows Explorer and other 64-bit file ...


3

P stands for patch. It means only a small update was made, so the whole file did not need to be sent.


3

I believe this will destroy the privileges you've set. You might be able to preserve permission using SSH and Cygwin, but then adding the files via Windows and TortoiseCVS will destroy the permissions again. Your best bet is to use command line CVS on the server, it isn't hard... just make sure that CVSROOT is set to the path for CVS: export ...


2

Take a look at BeyondCompare and Araxis Merge. They offer instructions on integrating them into TortoiseSVN as custom merge/diff tools.


2

I don't know any client but have you reported a bug against tortoisecvs/svn? It might be easy enough to fix.


2

Subversion clients are required to pass all strings utf-8 encoded to the underlying API and therefore to the server. TortoiseSVN definitely does this. As does every other SVN client I tried (and isn't two years old). But of course, you can only enter/show japanese comments if the corresponding fonts are installed on the machine. If you could specify an ...


2

There are some other avenues you can take to interact with your *nix bretheren. Install VirtualBox and a distribution of Linux so you can natively run the same toolset. Install VirtualBox and a copy of Windows XP, which is known to work with TortoiseCVS. You can find VMWare appliances pre-loaded with a linux distribution, which you can import into VMWare ...


2

I haven't tested it but go TortoiseCVS-Preferences Tools Tab Two-way merge parameters in that it currently has set "%mine" "%yours", you might be able to change them to something else, but have not tested it.


2

Putty is probably the best SSH client out there: http://www.chiark.greenend.org.uk/~sgtatham/putty/


2

Reinstalling TortoiseCVS solved the problem. I had another concurrent install at the time of the first TortoiseCVS install, and that must have messed things up.


2

I'd recommend you stick with PuTTY too. You might find it useful to run Pageant in conjunction with Plink to avoid having to type in the passphrase. But if you want to research alternatives you should review this Wikipedia resource: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_SSH_clients


2

Thanks to jsight (and Mark Biek for pointing out the connection between plink and putty) I decided to investigate more fully. It turned out that plink had been using the "Default Settings" stored Session that I set up for putty and wasn't allowing them to be overridden. edit: The Geek: Also, this is a good example why you should always, always use ...


2

CVS is 'tied' to the repository by files in the .CVS folder. Each folder is 'tied' individually. This means you can just check out the full thing (or if you already have the full thing), then cut/paste the www directory out to somewhere else, and it will remain linked to the correct CVS location.


2

Try using :ssh: instead of :ext: as Tortoise uses CVSNT internally which supports SSH natively. It should be possible to get it to work with :ext: too but usually it's not worth the hassle. BTW: CVSNT's SSH support is also built upon PuTTY/Plink.


2

Go to first CVS folder, open Root file and add the user@ before the domain. For example: :pserver:yourcvsServer:/cvsroot/public should be changed with: :pserver:yourUsername@yourcvsServer:/cvsroot/public



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