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0

It's from your grep --colors option. When it's turned on, it will color the match part with red color, which will save as ^[[01;31m^[[K....^[[m^[[K tag, where the ... is the matched substring. Turn off the --color option, you will solve the problem.


1

I think in your code: $end1 = $start2 = 26 and $end2 < 26 So, double check the values of $end1 , $start2 and $end2


2

$ cat tst.awk BEGIN { numCols=1 } !NF { numRows=0; ++numCols; next } { a[++numRows,numCols]=$0 } END { for (r=1;r<=numRows;r++) { for (c=1;c<=numCols;c++) { printf "%s%s", a[r,c], (c<numCols?OFS:ORS) } } } $ awk -f tst.awk file aaa eee bbb fff ccc ggg ddd hhh


3

Ruby is handy for one-liners, and it has a builtin transpose method. Using a similar approach to Wintermute, we have: ruby -00 -F"\n" -ane ' BEGIN {data=[]} data << $F END {data.transpose.each {|row| puts row.join(" ")}} ' file I added another paragraph to the test file, and it outputs this: aaa eee iii bbb fff jjj ccc ggg kkk ddd hhh ...


6

There are many ways. A simple one using bash, paste, and GNU sed is paste -d ' ' <(sed '/^$/Q' filename) <(sed '0,/^$/d' filename) Here sed '/^$/Q' filename prints all lines in the file up to the first empty line sed '0,/^$/d' filename prints all lines after the first empty line <() is a bash-specific process substitution that expands to the ...


0

tr doesn't work like sed as it translates character by characters. Use sed like this: sed 's/ \([MG] \)/\1/g' Explanation: / \([MG] \)/ # match space followed by letter M or G and followed by another space. # Also capture matched letter in matched group #1 \1 # replace by back-reference #1


1

Retaining the original spacing and field alignment using GNU awk for the 3rd arg to match() and \s/\S: $ cat tst.awk NF==11 { match($0,/((\S+\s+){7}\S+)((\s+\S+){2})(.*)/,a) $0 = a[1] sprintf("%*d",length()-length(a[1]a[5]),$9*1048576) a[5] } { print } $ $ awk -f tst.awk file 2014-05-10 14:26:49.231 10.335 UDP 114.31.254.227:24874 -> ...


1

A way with column widths variable in Gawk. awk 'BEGIN{FIELDWIDTHS="101 5 100"}gsub("M","",$2){$2=$2*1048576}1' test | column -t Output 2014-05-10 14:26:49.231 10.335 UDP 114.31.254.227:24874 -> 56.213.85.253:13617 9 1139 1 2014-05-10 14:26:59.494 0.222 UDP 114.31.254.193:17769 -> 165.199.57.179:40012 3 172 ...


0

Through awk, $ awk '/([0-9]+\.[0-9]+|[0-9]+)[[:blank:]]*M/{$9=$9*1048576;$10=""}{$1=$1}1' file 2014-05-10 14:26:49.231 10.335 UDP 114.31.254.227:24874 -> 56.213.85.253:13617 9 1139 1 2014-05-10 14:26:59.494 0.222 UDP 114.31.254.193:17769 -> 165.199.57.179:40012 3 172 1 2014-05-10 14:26:56.015 3.348 TCP 96.196.161.39:80 -> 114.31.255.131:61066 5428 ...


1

Piling on the answer, with perl: To remove the specific labels: perl -pe 's/(?:name|age|hometown): *//ig' file To remove any label: perl -pe 's/\w+:\s*//ig' file tr is not the right tool, because it maps characters, not words.


2

What about deleting all the words ending in : from the input and printing what's left? $ awk '{ gsub(/[^ ]+: /, "") }1' data.txt Dean 23 Chicago Mary 68 New York Lisa 36 Los angeles Greg 18 London Edit: And as suggested in the comments, perhaps even more to the point is the sed equivalent: sed -r 's/[^ ]+: //g' data.txt # gnu sed -E 's/[^ ]+: //g' ...


4

$ awk -F' ?[^ ]+: ' '{print $2, $3, $4}' file Dean 23 Chicago Mary 68 New York Lisa 36 Los angeles Greg 18 London or in general for any number of fields: $ awk -F' ?[^ ]+: ' '{for (i=2;i<=NF;i++) printf "%s%s", $i, (i<NF?OFS:ORS)}' file Dean 23 Chicago Mary 68 New York Lisa 36 Los angeles Greg 18 London


2

You can use this gnu-awk command also: awk -v IGNORECASE=1 -v OFS='\t' -F ' *(Name|AGE|Hometown): *' ' { printf $2; for (i=3; i<=NF; i++) printf OFS $i; print ""}' file Dean 23 Chicago Mary 68 New York Lisa 36 Los angeles Greg 18 London


4

If you have GNU sed, it has an option I for case-insensitive match: sed 's/Name://gI;s/Age://gI;s/Hometown://gI' file With a slight change, the awk solution would work: awk '{ for(i=1;i<=NF;i++) {if ($i ~/:/) {$i=""}} ; print }' file


0

Given this file: $ cat file My hovercraft is full of eels Min luftpudebåd er fyldt med ål Mon aéroglisseur est plein d'anguilles โฮเวอร์คราฟท์ของผมเต็มไปด้วยปลาไหล Iyéčhiŋkiŋyaŋka čha kiŋyáŋ mitȟáwa kiŋ hoká ožúla! You can remove all the non-ascii with iconv -ct ascii: $ iconv -ct ascii < file My hovercraft is full of eels Min luftpudebd er fyldt med ...


0

As far as I know, tr can't be used for inplace modification. You could use sed as an alternative. Try: sed "s/<92>/'/g" index.html If you are agree with the output, use the inplace flag (-i) sed -i "s/<92>/'/g" index.html You can also refer to this answer: tr command not able to direct the Output?



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