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55

Since it is an expression that comma is simply the comma operator (meaning the type is the type of the rhs side: void), not another argument. That code is using SFINAE - it's enabled if t.reserve(n) exists but it wants to keep the return type as void.


33

There are certain cases where you must use a trailing return type. Most notably, a lambda return type, if specified, must be specified via a trailing return type. Also, if your return type utilizes a decltype that requires that the argument names are in scope, a trailing return type must be used (however, one can usually use declval<T> to work around ...


29

The trailing-return-type comes after cv- and ref-qualifiers of a non-static member function. This means the example in the question is the same as T const f(...);. §8.4.1 [dcl.fct.def.general] p2 The declarator in a function-definition shall have the form D1 ( parameter-declaration-clause ) cv-qualifier-seqopt ref-qualifieropt ...


16

In addition to what others said, the trailing return type also allows to use this, which is not otherwise allowed struct A { std::vector<int> a; // OK, works as expected auto begin() const -> decltype(a.begin()) { return a.begin(); } // FAIL, does not work: "decltype(a.end())" will be "iterator", but // the return statement returns ...


14

I fail to see a downside to having decltype perform type resolution after all parsing is completed (which would work fine for the above example). The downside is that it's not possible without fundamentally altering the basic foundations of the C++ parsing and processing model. In order to do what you suggest, the compiler will have to see the decltype ...


13

auto is required when introducing a trailing-return-type. §8.3.5 [dcl.fct] /2 In a declaration T D where D has the form D1 ( parameter-declaration-clause ) cv-qualifier-seqopt ref-qualifieropt exception-specificationopt attribute-specifier-seqopt trailing-return-type and the type of the contained declarator-id in the declaration ...


11

That is because it is a defect in the standard, and will be changed (see DR 975): 975 Restrictions on return type deduction for lambdas There does not appear to be any technical difficulty that would require the current restriction that the return type of a lambda can be deduced only if the body of the lambda consists of a single return ...


11

Actually, in C++, it's illegal to define a type in a parameter or return type, named or not. See C++11[diff.decl]: Change: In C++, types may not be defined in return or parameter types. In C, these type definitions are allowed So the actual problem is the first case being accepted, not the second one being rejected.


11

There are three important differences between a function using automatic-return-type-deduction and one with an explicit return-type (even if that is computed): You cannot do SFINAE on the computability of the return-type if you do not explicitly specify it: You get a hard error instead. Why? Because SFINAE only works with the declaration, not the ...


9

The trailing-return-type of a function is part of its “signature” (declaration), not of its “body” (definition), and as such, it only sees names that were declared before. At the point where you declare your begin member function, m_container hasn't been declared yet. (Note that the issue is not specific to template classes.) You could move the ...


8

You should use decltype and std::declval<> as: template<typename T1, typename T2> auto DoSomething(const T1& arg) -> decltype(arg * std::declval<T2>()) { T2 t2Obj; // Or have it obtained in some other way return arg * t2Obj; } because T2 might not have default constructor, so decltype(arg *T2()) may not work. But then ...


8

I misremembered. It was a defect at some point, but was eventually resolved and voted into the FDIS. §5.1.1 [expr.prim.general] If a declaration declares a member function or member function template of a class X, the expression this is a prvalue of type “pointer to cv-qualifier-seq X” between the optional cv-qualifer-seq and the end of the ...


7

You are correct, this is a bug. According to N3291, section 5.1.1, paragraph 3: If a declaration declares a member function or member function template of a class X, the expression this is a prvalue of type “pointer to cv-qualifier-seq X” between the optional cv-qualifer-seq and the end of the function-definition, member-declarator, or declarator. It shall ...


5

The trailing-return-type isn't much different from the normal return type, except that it's specified after the parameter list and cv-/ref-qualifiers. Also, it doesn't necessarily need decltype, a normal type is fine too: auto answer() -> int{ return 42; } So by now you should see what the answer to your question is: template<class T> using ...


4

Your code is invalid C++11, because the class is not consider complete in the return type of a member function. You can only access members that have previously been declared. Like so class MyClass { private: int _arg; public: MyClass(int i): _arg(i) {} template <typename F> auto apply(F& f) -> decltype(f(_arg)) { return f(_arg); ...


4

template <typename A> struct S { A a; template <typename B> auto f(B b) -> decltype(a.f(b)) { } }; This works because within a trailing return type, members of the surrounding class are visible. Not all members, but only the members that are declared prior to it (in a trailing return type, the class is not ...


4

Well one obvious problem is that it would open you up to loops. typedef decltype(lhs+lhs) foo; foo lhs;


3

It seems, that it's CLang's bug, because the next code struct A { int operator[](int); auto at(int i) -> decltype( this-> operator[]( i ) ); }; compiles by CLang as well - http://liveworkspace.org/code/2Myghk$6


3

I would say that clang is correct, due to 13.3.1.2p3 (1st bullet). For a unary operator @ with an operand of a type whose cv-unqualified version is T1, and for a binary operator @ with a left operand of a type whose cv-unqualified version is T1 and a right operand of a type whose cv-unqualified version is T2, three sets of candidate functions, ...


3

Reading the error message carefully, the problem is obvious: candidate template ignored: substitution failure [with T1 = int, T2 = float]: 'x' is a private member of 'Widget<int>' Non-member binary operator* is trying to access private member x in its declaration (and definition). Since you have a setter function, a plain solution is to also ...


2

just to re-iterate mine and Stephane's comment: This is an obvious bug in clang, since your class obviously has an operator[](int). Whether or not the code using decltype() is valid, is a subtly different question (I would say it is valid, but cannot prove it).


2

See this nice article: http://www.cprogramming.com/c++11/c++11-auto-decltype-return-value-after-function.html Very good example when to use this syntax without decltype in game: class Person { public: enum PersonType { ADULT, CHILD, SENIOR }; void setPersonType (PersonType person_type); PersonType getPersonType (); private: PersonType ...


2

The Standard says (section 14.6.2.1): If, for a given set of template arguments, a specialization of a template is instantiated that refers to a member of the current instantiation with a qualified-id or class member access expression, the name in the qualified-id or class member access expression is looked up in the template instantiation context. ...


2

The body of a member function is compiled as if it was defined after the class. Therefore everything declared in the class is in scope at that point. However, the declaration of the function is still inside the class declaration and can only see names that precede it. template <typename A> struct S { template <typename B> auto f(B b) ...


2

I can only assume that your original pseudo code is a function template, or otherwise SFINAE would not work altogether. Now if it is a template function, you can use an extra template argument that is defaulted and use SFINAE on that argument: template <typename T, typename _ = typename std::enable_if< trait<T>::value >::type > static auto ...


2

The name m_container has not been introduced at the point the functions are declared. Switch the order of declarations, and the code will work. See working version here.


2

You'd need std::declval for this, but unfortunately, VS2010 doesn't implement that yet. So you'll have to work around it a bit: template <typename Type> class Noodles { private: Type _value; static Type myTypeDeclval(); public: auto operator*( ) -> decltype( *myTypeDeclval() ) const { return *_value; } };


2

Visual Studio 2012 Don't mind the sloppy code. It was a quick fix for code that didn't compile properly to begin with (nevermind the auto decltype problem). template<typename T> class Widget { public: T x; public: Widget() : x(666) {} ~Widget() {} void SetX(T value) { x = value; } ...


2

As this question's answer (provided by Praetorian) indicates, the declaration is only complete after the return type, and GCC is correct. I believe clang's behavior is also allowable, but it's not portable. The answer in the link gives a workaround using a traits class, and that will usually do the job, but it's somewhat awkward and can be error prone ...


2

Edit after @Xeo constructive comments: It seems that this issue is due a contradiction between two places of the draft standard. According to the draft standard § 7.1.6.4 auto specifier [dcl.spec.auto]: 1 The auto and decltype(auto) type-specifiers designate a placeholder type that will be replaced later, either by deduction from an initializer or by ...



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