New answers tagged

1

This would make things like vec << 4 possible, which would be nice sugar for vec.push(4). Although it can be done, it is generally a bad idea to implement an operator with a unexpected semantic. Here is an example of how this can be done: use std::ops::Shl; struct BadVec<T>(Vec<T>); impl<T> Shl<T> for BadVec<T> { ...


0

At this time, it does not seem to be possible and no workarounds exist.


0

I just wanted to add, not really an answer, but some information for anyone else who ends up here dealing with reference traits. I struggled to figure out why the generic reference trait didn't work for all types and then I discovered that there is an implied Sized trait applied in this case that needs to be explicitly cleared with ?Sized. The following is ...


2

Including it as a trait isn't inherently wrong (pun intended), but I think it would make more sense as either an abstract class by which Generic extends or even just included in Generic. Presumably this method will apply to all of your ApiResourcess, but it will only ever apply to your ApiResources - it won't be used for any other class. So ApiResources ...


6

You are requesting that &str should be coerced to &Display (a reference to trait object), which seems to make sense since the type str implements Display. Yet as of Rust 1.9 (and no current plans of changing this), the conversion to a trait object is only possible for &T to &Trait if the type T is “Sized”. The reason is the implementation. ...


1

By changing display(s) to display(&s) it works again. It all goes down to &str: Display (+ Sized) and str: !Display (this is just a notation) display(s) expects s: &Display, => &str: &Display which is false. display(&s) expects &s: &Display => &(&str) : &Display which is true as &str: Display


5

(Promoted my edits to the main answer) When you write fn display(x: &Display), the function takes a value that can be coerced into a trait object by dereferencing it. Also Rust function requires the value size of the parameter x to be known at the compile time. When &34 (&u32 type) is dereferenced and coerced into trait object, it becomes u32 ...


1

That's a current limitation as described here This issue is specific to @CompileStatic. Let me explain. When you define a static method in a trait, the static method does not "belong" to the trait. Instead, it will be copied to the class implementing the trait. So on the trait itself, the static someStaticMethod is not defined. For this to work,...


0

I had the same problem but came around like this: Imaging I want to pickle only parts of a quiet big class and some of the objects has been set so transient=True so they're not pickled because there is nothing important to save, e.g. class LineSpectrum(HasTraits): andor_cam = Instance(ANDORiKonM, transient=True) In difference to objects which should ...


0

After looking at your question again, I think what you are looking to for is a way of accessing the SortedListWithKey object as if it were a list and using the Traits or TraitsUI machinery to be able to validate/view/modify it. The Property trait should help here allowing you to view the SortedListWithKey as a list. I have modified my code example below to ...


2

Q1. Using what kind of template technical, could be called "meta programming"? Template metaprogramming refers to use of templates and the compiler to perform some of the key elements of programming: Looping, if-else branching, C/C++ switch like branching, recursion, etc. The first such meta program was used to generate the first few prime numbers as ...


1

"Metaprogramming" is used in informal speech to refer to a variety of programming techniques: Information about types, i.e "type traits". This is the most straight forward type of meta, in that "meta" here means "about something" (Ab)using the C preprocessor or templates. You are not really programming "in" C++ but rather a sublanguage. The IOCCC has ...


1

To Specifically answer the question, the second form allows you to select the traits class at the call site, eg: #include <vector> #include <iostream> template<class T> struct AccumulationTraits { using AccT = T; static constexpr AccT zero() { return AccT(0); } }; template <typename T, typename AT = AccumulationTraits<T> ...


1

The point is that function templates allow for the deduction of template parameters from the function call expression, whereas there is no such analogue for class templates. If you only had the class template, you would need to spell out the template parameters yourself: int arr_sum = Accum<int>::accum(arr, arr + len); // ^^^^^ By ...


1

You are making Form Event Listener, so inside your Form Type you have something like $builder->addEventSubscriber(new EntrarYPreregistroFormSubscriber()); so you can see that Form Event Listeners works with a little difference that a regular Event Listener. As it is you who creates the object, so it is you should call setContainer($serviceContainer). To ...


2

You can extend traits somewhat. Expanding on mrlee's answer, when you use a trait you can rename its methods. Say for example you have a "parent" trait that was defined by your framework: trait FrameworkTrait { public function keepMe() { // Framework's logic that you want to keep } public function replaceMe() { // Framework's ...


4

Firstly, the type of self in fn who_am_i_inner is already a reference, so you don't need to &. fn who_am_i_inner(&self) -> Side { Side::Good(self) } But then rustc complains... <anon>:13:20: 13:24 error: the trait `core::marker::Sized` is not implemented for the type `Self` [E0277] <anon>:13 Side::Good(self) ...


7

Short answer: you don't need the mod phone in phone.rs. Just remove that and your code will work (assuming the rest of the code is correct). Longer answer: The following code in main.rs: pub mod phone; is equivalent to: pub mod phone { // literally insert the contents of phone.rs here } so you don't need to wrap everything in phone.rs in mod phone ...



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