Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

3. isn't specific enough to name a type on it's own - it could be either f32 of f64. You could be more explicit in (at least) these two ways: let v = Point{x: 3f32, y: 4f32, z: 5f32}; let v: Point<f32> = Point{x: 3., y: 4., z: 5.};


3

One way to accomplish such restrictions on ways of mixing traits is following: trait Dash[T <: Dash[T]] trait Right extends Dash[Right] trait Left extends Dash[Left] val t = new Wink with Dash[Right] This way, [T <: Dash[T]] forces us to provide either Right or Left trait right away. (Right or Left in your requirements) On the other hand Due to ...


3

The problem is that your call to test(&A::open_file): typedef decltype(test(&A::open_file)) return_type; is always matched to: static std::false_type test(...) because your true-test has an undeduced type template parameter Buffer: template<class A, class Buffer> // ~~~~~^ static std::true_type test(void (A::*)(int) ...


0

The answer is "circularity". But not only. Self type annotation solves for me the fundamental problem of inheritance: what you inherit from cannot use what you are. With the self type, everything becomes easy. My pattern is the following and can be considered as a degenerated cake: trait A { self: X => def a = reuseme} trait B { self: X => def b = ...


0

I didn't understand completely but this might help you. public interface ITrait { string DoSomething(); } public class Trait<T> where T : ITrait, new() { public string DoSomething() { ITrait trait = new T(); return trait.DoSomething(); } } public class TraitUser : ITrait { public string DoThing() { ...


0

If I understand youright, you need get information about generic type T in TraitUser instance in TrairInspector. public interface IGetTraitInfo { Type GetTraitObjectType(); object GetTraitObject(); } public class TraitUser<T> : IGetTraitInfo { private T _thing; public void DoThingWithT(T thing) { _thing = thing; } ...


0

Scala has something called type linearization. It defines initialization order. Read here http://eed3si9n.com/constraining-class-linearization-in-Scala


0

When you omit the implementation, base is a template of a trait and has different evaluation rules. See the Scala specification


3

You have trait objects when you have a pointer to a trait. Box, Arc, Rc and the reference & are all, at their core, pointers. In terms of defining a "trait object" they work (or should, once 1.0 is out) in the same way. "Trait objects" are Rust's take on dynamic dispatch. Here's an example that I hope helps show what trait objects are: // define an ...


0

In my experience if this piece of code you pasted resides in different files/folders and you use spl_autoload_register func to load classes you need to do it like this //file is in FOO/FooFoo.php namespace FOO; trait fooFoo {} //file is in BAR/baz.php namespace BAR; class baz { use \FOO\fooFoo; // note the backslash at the beggining, use ...


2

The problem is that you haven't given the compiler enough information to figure out what T is. That's what the _ is for: it's having to infer the parameter to SomeStruct. Also, there are no types anywhere in this example that implement SomeTrait. If you fix both of these problems, it works (with some warnings): pub trait SomeTrait { fn ...


0

You can solve that by not using a DelegatesTo and only listen to changes on m.a: ``` class Child(Base): m = Instance(Material) b = Property(Float, depends_on=['m.a','x']) # <-- runs def _get_b(self): return self.a * self.x ``` The issue with the delegate seems related to set up the listener. The error message I get is DelegationError: ...


1

I suggest a pretty straightforward object-oriented style. It goes without traits, but with method-accessors in place of attribute-accessors: class Base { private static $properties; public static function getProperties() { if (!isset(self::$properties)) { self::$properties = ['val1', 'val2', 'val3']; // use `array('val1', 'val2', 'val3')` ...


2

You should create separate implementations, one with the bound and the other without, like this: impl<T:Num> Position<T>{ fn add(&self, other: &Position<T>) -> Box<Position<T>>{ box Position{x:self.x + other.x, y:self.y + other.y} } } impl<T> Position<T>{ fn display(&self) -> ...


1

As of rustc 0.13.0-nightly (8bca470c5 2014-12-08 00:12:30 +0000) defining last() as an inherent method on your type should work. #[deriving(Copy)] struct Foo<T> {t: T} impl<T> Iterator<T> for Foo<T> { fn next(&mut self) -> Option<T> { None } } // this does not work // error: conflicting implementations for trait ...


2

I think it's impossible in the current version of Text Explorer. There is one workaround that you can use in order to filter out some unwanted results: Trait:"Awesome" -Trait:"Awesomeness" or even Trait:"Awesome" -Trait:"Awesomen"


0

last should be moved to Iterator, rather than IteratorExt. IteratorExt is needed when using Box<Iterator> objects, to allow calling generic methods on them (e.g. map), because you can't put a generic method in a vtable. However, last isn't generic, so it can be put in Iterator.


1

You can't. Syntax extensions like macros and attributes are expanded prior to name resolution. This means that whilst you could get the identifier TraitToHack, you wouldn't be able to extract any information about the trait from it. The next best thing is to implement an attribute specifically for the trait, which has a hard-coded understanding of said ...



Top 50 recent answers are included