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Question 1. But what i understand is unless we declare transaction attribute with NotSupported or Never, when the method is executing (suppose with default Required attribute) its guaranteed the method to be run with in a transaction right? Yes, the default for container-managed transaction is Required, which will start a transaction if one does ...


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There is no support in the EJB programming model for recording and playing back a sequence of events. You will have to build the infrastructure to track this yourself.


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Because I don't care about security, I used SHA1. This generates a 20-byte hexadecimal string. BIGINT is 8 bytes in size. Therefore, we need to truncate to 16 characters (since each character is half a byte in hex) using substr, and use base_convert to convert to base 10 for database storage. function hashToBigInt ($string) { return ...


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Analytic answer: measure the number of new/same/updated/deleted records. There are four cases: The key in the B table is not present in the b_import: delete The key in the b_import is not present on the old B: insert The key is present in both old B and new B, but the contents are the same: ignore The keys are the same, but the attribete values differ: ...


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Don't you try to update your image_tag with invalid id? ..null, 0, -1 or something else? Look to your code. I suppose $img and $values->image are not the same, but you load $img only when $values->image is provided. However, you try to update image_tag every time.


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I also met this odd problem (converting nvarchar to integer exception). In my solution, I rebuild the transacton if found the underlying connection is null. But it's a dirty work.


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Except SQL 2014 and SQL Azure, all other versions returns random isolation levels. The recommended practice is to always reset the transaction isolation level before using the connection. Otherwise we may see unintended behavior and query failures. When we open connection, we need to make sure the isolation level is rest, command timeout is set to the right ...


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You could have a new table Transfers. It would be like: CREATE TABLE Transfers ( id INT AUTO_INCREMENT PRIMARY KEY, from_transaction_id INT, to_transaction_id INT, UNIQUE INDEX from_to (from_transaction_id, to_transaction_id), FOREIGN KEY from_transaction_id REFERENCES Transactions (id), FOREIGN KEY to_transaction_id REFERENCES ...


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Spring transactions are proxy-based. That exception would be thrown if a bean A called another bean B, because the transactional aspect would intercept the call and throw the exception. But here, you're calling another method in the same object, and the transactional proxy is thus out of the picture.


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@Transactional annotations only apply to the Spring proxy objects. For example, if you call allProcessOnDB_second() from some spring bean which injects your service like this @Autowired private MyService myService; ... myService.allProcessOnDB_second(); then myService is Spring proxy, and its @Transactional(propagation = Propagation.REQUIRED) is ...


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For this case, i will used Optimistic lock in your bids objects... the race condition will still occurs, but it will be detected when the transaction tries to commit the changes at your domain objects (throwing an exception if the version readed was updated by another thread). So any change on any bid object, will be almost serializable (i say "almost" ...


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Executing a DDL statement causes an "implicit commit". But the statement has to be executed. The scenario you give doesn't make sense to me, the createStatement method doesn't take a string as an argument, does it? We typically see stmt = conn.createStatement(); stmt.execute("CREATE TABLE ... "); If you actually execute a DDL statement, it causes an ...


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You can't use @Transactional in that way but you can programmatically configure aspects with Spring. Spring documentation for programmatically defining aspects: http://docs.spring.io/spring/docs/3.0.x/spring-framework-reference/html/aop.html#aop-aspectj-programmatic http://docs.spring.io/spring/docs/3.0.x/spring-framework-reference/html/aop-api.html The ...


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I think you probably can't use @Transactional in that manner. One of spring's in-built PostProcessors, are supposed to scan all classes (beans) that have that annotation, and the create Aspects accordingly. About alternatives: I would write an Adapter class for each 3rd party class I have to use. And then make those Adapter classes be Spring Beans.


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Basically this is exactly the expected behavior. A RuntimeException, that is thrown in a Service and is not caught in the same service, leads to a Rollback of the transaction (see grails service docs: 12.1 Declarative Transactions). If you want to get around it, you have different possibilities. The first one is, that this Rollback behavior is only true for ...


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I solved my problem. Thanks guys for pointing out allowing AspectJ but that wasn't the end. I did deeper research and it turned out that in @Transactional Spring Beans there's an aspect proxy, which is responsible(as far as get it) for operating on transactions(creating, rolling back etc.) for @Transactional methods. But it fails on self reference, because ...


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Yes whatever you are doing perfectly fine. Below lines I am directly quoting from MySQL documentation. "If you query data and then insert or update related data within the same transaction, the regular SELECT statement does not give enough protection. .. To implement reading and incrementing the counter, first perform a locking read of the counter using ...


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reading here: http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.5/en/commit.html By default, MySQL runs with autocommit mode enabled. This means that as soon as you execute a statement that updates (modifies) a table, MySQL stores the update on disk to make it permanent. The change cannot be rolled back. try something like SET autocommit = 0; start ...


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Here you have a very generic answer, and with the warning that I don't know much about zope. Just some simple database heuristics. Hope it helps. How to use SQLAlchemy sessions: First, take a look to their own explanation here As they say: The calls to instantiate Session would then be placed at the point in the application where database ...


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Session session = getSession(dataSource, sessionFactory, Connection.TRANSACTION_SERIALIZABLE); public Session getSession(DataSource dataSource, SessionFactory sessionFactory, int isolationLevel){ // Get connection from current dataSource and set new isolation Connection connectionWithNewIsolation = dataSource.getConnection(); ...


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TRUNCATE is not allowed on any table referenced by a foreign key, unless you use TRUNCATE CASCADE, which will also truncate the referencing tables. The DEFERRABLE status of the constraint does not affect this. I don't think there is any way around this; you will need to drop the constraint. However, there is no risk of an integrity violation in doing so. ...


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You can make the foreign key constraint deferrable (initially deferred). That way it will be checked just once at the end of the transaction. ALTER TABLE xxx ADD CONSTRAINT xxx_yyy_id_fk FOREIGN KEY (yyy_id) REFERENCES yyy DEFERRABLE INITIALLY DEFERRED; In all the cases, transactions are fully atomic in PostgreSQL (not only in theory), including DDL ...


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The default behaviour is to commit after a checked exception and rollback after an unchecked one. If you like to do a rollback after checked exceptions, add a rollback rule to your transaction specification. Use "PROPAGATION_REQUIRED,-Exception" for generic exceptionsor "PROPAGATION_REQUIRED,-MyException" for a specific one. If your method declares that ...


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As mentionned in M.Deinum comment, I forgot the @EnableAspectJAutoProxy in my configuration class, this fixed the problem. Will flag this as the right answer when allowed.


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What M. Deinum said. Furthermore, according to the Spring documentation: Consider the use of AspectJ mode (see mode attribute in table below) if you expect self-invocations to be wrapped with transactions as well. In this case, there will not be a proxy in the first place; instead, the target class will be weaved (that is, its byte code will be ...


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No, it's because of the await Task<int>.Factory.FromAsync(stream.BeginRead, stream.EndRead, buffer, 0, buffer.Length, null); The tricky part is that your async method is returning void. That's a big no-no unless you know what you're doing (which you obviously don't right now). Have it return Task instead, and the same for all the other ...


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Clarification The question leaves room for interpretation. This is how I understand the task: Lock a maximum of limit URLs which fulfill some criteria and are not locked, yet. To spread out the load on sources, every URL should come from a different source. DB design Assuming a separate table source: this makes the job faster and easier. If you don't ...


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First try: UPDATE webpages SET locked = TRUE WHERE url IN ( SELECT DISTINCT ON (source) url FROM webpages WHERE ( last IS NULL OR last < refreshFrequency ) AND locked = FALSE LIMIT limit ) WHERE ( ...


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transactionErrorHandler() exists in SpringRouteBuilder which extends RouteBuilder


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Turns out it wasn't a JPA/JBoss/etc. issue. It was because my thread ran in a camel context. It took me a day of searching to find out: Important : One transaction is associated with a single thread of execution! – If you use “seda”, “vm”, “jms” or any other protocol in your sub route which will process the exchange in an different thread, this execution ...


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I think the best way is to use @Transactional and set it as Supported not Required for such service in this way if your service call outside a transaction it will not start a Transaction and if it calls from other service that is Transactional and already start a transaction it will participate in that transaction. for example think that one service ...


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Yes, you should always access the database from inside a transaction. Not doing it will in fact create a transaction for every select statements. Transactions aren't just useful for atomicity of updates. They also provide isolation guarantees. For example, (depending on the isolation level) reading the same row twice in a single transaction can return you ...


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Read this to understand your requirement. SET TRANSACTION ISOLATION LEVEL Either of the two should suit you: READ UNCOMMITTED Specifies that statements can read rows that have been modified by other transactions but not yet committed. READ COMMITTED Specifies that statements cannot read data that has been modified but not committed by other transactions. ...


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The resource is the 32 bits XID transaction counter itself, which is used by the engine to know if the version of a row in a table is associated to an "old" transaction (committed or rolled back) or a not-yet-committed transaction, and if it's visible or not from any given transaction. Increasing XIDs at a super-high rate creates or increases the risk of ...


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YES! I had the same issue. The scary answer is that SQLServer sometimes rolls back a transaction on the server side when it encounters an error, and does not pass the error back to the client. YIKES! Look on the Google Group microsoft.public.dotnet.framework.adonet for "SqlTransaction.ZombieCheck error" Colberd Zhou [MSFT] explains it very well. and see ...


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The psycogpg2 document for the with statement implies that the with connection.cursor() as cursor: will wrap that code in a transaction. this is actually not true it says: with psycopg2.connect(DSN) as conn: with conn.cursor() as curs: curs.execute(SQL) When a connection exits the with block, if no exception has been raised by the ...


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You should also remove the session.getTransaction().begin();, together with the session.getTransaction().commit();. When you use container managed transactions, you should never start a transaction yourself. Container managed transactions are the way the go when you don't know what you are doing. You should read a little about container managed ...


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You generally want to use transactions even for read-only operations, since a transaction will give you a consistent view of your data. If you skip transactions, you risk seeing partial updates from some other incomplete transaction.


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I dont't think that there will be any adverse effects because a transaction simply defines an atomic set of operations. If a transaction fails then a rollback will be performed, but read-only operations don't affect the database in any way. The only big disadvantage I can think of is related to performance. The locking-strategy of the underlying database ...


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It's only a self-invoking problem if you're using org.springframework.transaction.annotation.Transactional - you should be using @grails.transaction.Transactional instead which has the same configuration options but uses AST transforms instead of runtime proxies to avoid the issue of not calling the proxied method. When using the Grails annotation each ...


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You've faced self-invoking. Look here: Spring - @Transactional - What happens in background? or Spring @Transactional Annotation : Self Invocation Here is excerption from one of my classes: @Service("authzService") public class AuthorizationService implements IAuthorizationService { @Resource(name="authzService") private IAuthorizationService ...


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I think what you are trying to achieve here is to create a generic Test class that implements the initialize and cleanup so you don't have to repeat that code for every test, is that correct? Are you even sure that those methods are even called? Be aware that you can't subclass [TestInitialize] and [TestCleanup], so you would have to call those methods from ...


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I think my answer in another thread I gave recently will give you some insight. Check it out.


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This is because you are using the wrong datatype for @cmd. sysname datatype has a limited length of 128 Unicode characters. I would also advise you to try to avoid dynamic sql since it's usually very vulnerable to SQL Injection attacks.


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You can't do INCR and get the result in a MULTI block - you'll have to EXECute the block for the INCR to actually run (and return the result). Instead, the WATCH allows you to attempt an optimistic transaction - it will fail if the WATCHed key is changed. So, consider the following code: var name = 'Josh'; client.watch('id'); client.get('id', function(err, ...


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Known as 'multi-doc' or 'two-phase' commit; http://docs.mongodb.org/manual/tutorial/perform-two-phase-commits/


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Managed to get it work by using SqlTransaction instead of TransactionScope and passing the same connection and transaction to the command objects that were used to execute the two stored procedures. It seams TransactionScope cannot be used in this scenario. Thanks for your comments.


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No you cannot do parallel work in the same transaction. The work must occur on the same thread.


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I think I see what's going on here. It's actually impossible for the Fragment to be duplicated with only one view container. I suspect that the items in your ListFragment are getting duplicated due to the call to populateList() in onActivityCreated(). BecauseonActivityCreated() is called every time you click the back button to return to ColorListFragment ...


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If you're using Spring you can use something like this: @Transactional(isolation = Isolation.SERIALIZABLE) and it works for the JpaTransactionManager. If you are using JtaTransactionManager the request-scope transaction isolation is not propagated, as this is the default JTA behavior. Because JTA doesn’t support transaction-scoped isolation levels, ...



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