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Edit: In order for transaction scopes to work together with async-await, starting from .NET 4.5.1 you can pass in a TransactionScopeAsyncFlowOption.Enabled flag to its constructor: using (var scope = new TransactionScope(... , TransactionScopeAsyncFlowOption.Enabled)) This makes sure that the transaction scopes behaves nicely with continuations. See ...


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When clients communicate with Service Bus queues over the TCP protocol, the maximum number of concurrent connections to a single Service Bus queue is limited to 100. This number is shared between senders and receivers. If this quota is reached, subsequent requests for additional connections will be rejected and an exception will be received by the calling ...


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Denise Skidmore says about problems with UpdatedOn field that you can faces when use 2ed approach. But if you worry about blocking whole DB you can change IsolationLevel of TransactionScope. Default isolation level is Serializable Volatile data can be read but not modified, and no new data can be added during the transaction. So to avoid blocking ...


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A System.Transactions.Transaction starts on the first database call made while it is active. This means that both variants do the same this assuming that the two lines you moved do not call the database. That makes this a matter of style. Pick what makes your intent the clearest. Serializable isolation does not block the whole database. I consider this out ...


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Maybe this will solve you problem: Write a Oracle PL/SQL Procedure to write the log. This procedure must have the pragma "AUTONOMOUS_TRANSACTION". Then call this procedure instead of inserting directly.


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It seems you are looking for SavePoints, i.e. the option to partially roll back and then resume a larger transaction. AFAIK TransactionScope doesn't support SavePoints so you'll need to deal directly with the native provider (e.g. SqlClient if your RDBMS is Sql Server). (i.e. you cannot leverage the ability of TransactionScope to implement DTC equivalent of ...


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This: Task.WhenAll(tasks); Is your problem. Task.WhenAll returns an awaitable, it doesn't block on the method call. Since you're using a console application which cannot be awaited, you'll have to defer to use Task.WaitAll instead which will explicitly block until both requests finish and will propagate any exception via AggregateException try { ...



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