Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

5

The usual way to do what you need to do is to dispose and reload your entity from fresh in the catch block, so that unless the scope is properly committed, your entity gets reloaded as it was before any change was applied to it. see this question and all answers for more details: Undo changes in entity framework entities


2

Well, after some digging today I found out a bit around this that I will share findings both for others to know and to get opinions and suggestions. There are several reasons why my issue happens dependent on the environment. Database server version: First of all, the result of the operations depends on the SQL Server version you are running (tested on ...


2

Far as I know, unless the code block is specifically written to know that it can time out (for instance, it's a loop checking the elapsed time and termitating if necessary), there is no way to timeout the operation without aborting the thread. That is messy, as you've pointed out. If the code-block limitations permit this (no state), I would probably start a ...


1

No, the library does not currently support this - not least because redis does not support rollback or commit of any kind. Redis transactions are not like RDBMS transactions.


1

Read what Khanh TO says. If your connection is opened outside the outer transaction scope the connection won't be enlisted. That is why the first call didn't rollback when the second failed. You will have to enlist your connection: using (TransactionScope tran = new TransactionScope(TransactionScopeOption.Required)) { ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible