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Locks of different types and scopes are taken during an operation and the lock scope will change due to lock escalation as the number of locks increases. If, in a single transaction, you are inserting/update/delete a single row in a single table, an exclusive row lock will most likely be taken. As you update/insert/delete more rows in that table, once you ...


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Also late... You can easily have "nested" transactions in the business layer even if the database doesn't support nested transactions. .NET controls the nesting and ends up using one database transaction (at least in the case of SQL Server 2008+). This makes it much easier to reuse data access code outside of its original intent, as part of a larger ...


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after more investigations, turns out that something - probably Entity Framework upgrade or database update process had put Enlist=false; into the database connection string. That effectively stops EF from picking up Transaction Scope. So the solution is to set it to true, or remove it, I think by default it's true


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Try changing your query to: SELECT @@OPTIONS USE [TransactionScopeTests]; DELETE FROM T3; DELETE FROM T1; You should see different options at the level of the session, as this is what a transaction scope alters. Give it a try and the options should be different!



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