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I don't think Check Constraints are suitable for a scenario like yours.You should use a instead of update/insert trigger to check that there's at least one row (in the table and /or in inserted values) You have a inserted table in a trigger that contains all the rows that will be inserted so you can write something like this : IF NOT EXISTS (SELECT * FROM ...


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You should be using a transaction scope like this. ` Try ' Create the TransactionScope to execute the commands, guaranteeing ' that both commands can commit or roll back as a single unit of work. Using scope As New TransactionScope() Using connection1 As New SqlConnection(connectString1) ' Opening the ...


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Well. I could think of a couple of approaches to what, I think, you want. Firstly, I suppose you could pass along the name of the function(s) you want to invoke on your 'source' inside the scope and use reflection to invoke the correct method. Much like in this post: Calling a function from a string in C# Or, you could do the same as your predicate... ...


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You can try by using a generic Func, like this: public static TSource ReadUncommittedAction<TSource>(Func<TSource> func) { var transactionOptions = new TransactionOptions() { IsolationLevel = System.Transactions.IsolationLevel.ReadUncommitted }; TSource outputItem; using (var scope = new ...


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It seems to be a problem with your DTC Timeout which is timed out at the moment you are stating the second connection and promote the transaction to a dtc transaction. You can change the time out in the machine settings. You change the timeout for all DTC transaction, so you can have a performance impact when changing it to a large value. A 10 min timeout ...


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I know this question was asked a long while ago, but I think I have the answer for anyone still having this problem. Nested Transactions in SQL are not as they would appear in the structure of the code that creates them. No matter how many nested transactions there are, only the outer transaction matters. For the outer transaction to be able to commit, ...


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The TS is creating an ambient transaction which your DAL layer will automatically pick up on. Your code implies you want the delete and create to be considered an atomic operation. If you want them independent create another TS block after the first and move your create statement there. If you want to rollback you need to leave the using block without ...


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Good news. Thanks to Jeff Sternal (who nicely identified the problem) I updated https://nhibernate.jira.com/browse/NH-3583 and thanks to the NH staff, there's already a fix and a pull request so in the upcoming release 4.1.x.x this ISSUE will be fixed.


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If someone is still interested this is how I did it using reflection. For more information please take a look to this article private void ConfigureTransactionTimeout(TimeSpan value) { //initializing internal stuff // ReSharper disable once NotAccessedVariable var timespan = TransactionManager.MaximumTimeout; //initializing it again to be ...


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From NHibernate cookbook Remember that NHibernate requires an NHibernate transaction when interacting with the database. TransactionScope is not a substitute. As illustrated in the next image, the TransactionScope should completely surround both the session and NHibernate transaction. The call to TransactionScope.Complete() should occur after the session ...


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I prefer to set up Transaction by TransactionOptions and TransactionScope classes. From Isolation Level on Wiki, the RepeatableRead level should be enough in your case. using System.Transactions; .... TransactionOptions options = new TransactionOptions(); options.IsolationLevel = IsolationLevel.RepeatableRead; // Set timeout to avoid dead lock conditions. ...


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In this kind of situation, I usually make an extra table AccountVoucherNumberGenerator that hold the last number. Either you can do an insert and use Identity Insert (the easiest way) or you can choose to have just 1 row and update that row with the last used number.


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Implicit Unbind only does what it says when the transaction is non-distributed - that is, when only one connection uses that transaction and the server supports promotable transactions (which IIRC is SQL Server 2005 or later). In your code example, when the second connection is opened and automatically enlists in the transaction, the transaction is promoted ...



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