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I am using NServiceKit.Redis, and using TransactionScope. I have tested it, and it appears as it works as it should. I think it's the same for StackExchange, as they are pretty similar. Otherwise consider changing, then you don't have to deal with the maximum client call restriction. At least if you are just testing.


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No, the library does not currently support this - not least because redis does not support rollback or commit of any kind. Redis transactions are not like RDBMS transactions.


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Addressing the main issue first: How is it possible that a timeout exception can occur when the timeout setting is (presumably, aside from inner workings that I do not know about) the same for all transaction scopes and has a timeout value defined of 1 day, where the exception occurs after approx. 10 minutes? There is the ...


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According to the MSDN Documentation for the acceptChangesDuringSave parameter of ObjectContext.SaveChanges If true, the change tracking on all objects is reset after SaveChanges(Boolean) finishes. If false, you must call the AcceptAllChanges method after SaveChanges(Boolean) This should mean that all objects in the change tracker will still have ...


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The usual way to do what you need to do is to dispose and reload your entity from fresh in the catch block, so that unless the scope is properly committed, your entity gets reloaded as it was before any change was applied to it. see this question and all answers for more details: Undo changes in entity framework entities


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Well, after some digging today I found out a bit around this that I will share findings both for others to know and to get opinions and suggestions. There are several reasons why my issue happens dependent on the environment. Database server version: First of all, the result of the operations depends on the SQL Server version you are running (tested on ...


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Far as I know, unless the code block is specifically written to know that it can time out (for instance, it's a loop checking the elapsed time and termitating if necessary), there is no way to timeout the operation without aborting the thread. That is messy, as you've pointed out. If the code-block limitations permit this (no state), I would probably start a ...


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Although in SQL there's something that transaction level, and it seems that nested transactions exists, but it's not so - at least not in the way you think it is (i know, had similar issue to solve). EXPERIMENT: You can try calling multiple begin tran inside a SQL query window, ask the transaction level and transaction id. The level will increase, but in ...


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You can use scope inner and outer for transaction: string connectionString = ConfigurationManager.ConnectionStrings["db"].ConnectionString; var option = new TransactionOptions { IsolationLevel = IsolationLevel.ReadCommitted, Timeout = TimeSpan.FromSeconds(60) }; using (var scopeOuter = new TransactionScope(TransactionScopeOption.Required, option)) ...


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Read what Khanh TO says. If your connection is opened outside the outer transaction scope the connection won't be enlisted. That is why the first call didn't rollback when the second failed. You will have to enlist your connection: using (TransactionScope tran = new TransactionScope(TransactionScopeOption.Required)) { ...


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Option 1 is the more sensible approach. Adding 5000 objects and then saving changes is very non-performant. A better approach is while (null != (entity = GetNextEntity()) { if (entity.IsValid()) { context.Add(entity); context.SaveChanges(); } } Update -- Ignore SQL errors while (null != (entity = GetNextEntity()) { ...


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1) You need to check whether the tran.Complete(); is called. If the tran.Complete(); is called, the TransactionScope is considered completed successfully. From MSDN When your application completes all work it wants to perform in a transaction, you should call the Complete method only once to inform that transaction manager that it is acceptable to ...



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