Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

after more investigations, turns out that something - probably Entity Framework upgrade or database update process had put Enlist=false; into the database connection string. That effectively stops EF from picking up Transaction Scope. So the solution is to set it to true, or remove it, I think by default it's true


0

Using new TransactionScope is considered harmful: See here: http://blogs.msdn.com/b/dbrowne/archive/2010/05/21/using-new-transactionscope-considered-harmful.aspx and do like this: using(TransactionScope scope = new TransactionScope( TransactionScopeOption.Required, new TransactionOptions { IsolationLevel = IsolationLevel.ReadCommitted})) { ...


1

Try using the transaction from the db instance it self, db.Database.BeginTransaction() if I recall it correctly instead of using the transaction scope. using (var ts = db.Database.BeginTransaction()) { .. } Assuming that db is your entity framework context.


0

I found the solution in this link: http://www.codeproject.com/Articles/729805/MSDTC-Manager?msg=4765921#xx4765921xx i just made some changes, cause i dont need full features. Really works


0

Those settings are stored in the registry. You can change them there via code and then restart the MSDTC service with the normal .NET Windows Service control class. I did not find a more official way to change those settings directly. The key, where the interesting settings are stored, is HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\MSDTC\Security Note that ...


1

Also late... You can easily have "nested" transactions in the business layer even if the database doesn't support nested transactions. .NET controls the nesting and ends up using one database transaction (at least in the case of SQL Server 2008+). This makes it much easier to reuse data access code outside of its original intent, as part of a larger ...


0

I believe you are coming acress a stale datacontext issue. Your update is done through a stored procedure so your context does not "see" the changes and has no way to update the Users. If you use a new datacontext to do the assert, it usually works well. However, since you are using a transaction you probably have to add the second datacontext to the same ...


1

Locks of different types and scopes are taken during an operation and the lock scope will change due to lock escalation as the number of locks increases. If, in a single transaction, you are inserting/update/delete a single row in a single table, an exclusive row lock will most likely be taken. As you update/insert/delete more rows in that table, once you ...


7

It seems you may be re-inventing TransactionScope. Doing all this under a unit of work is straightforward*: using (TransactionScope scope = new TransactionScope()) { ... Do Stuff with Connection 1 using SqlDataReader ... Do Stuff with Connection 2 using Entity Framework ... Do Stuff with Connection 3 on another Oracle Database ... ...


3

use TransactionScope, it will take care of committing or rolling back all included transactions: using (var ts = new TransactionScope()) { ... // your old code ts.Complete() }



Top 50 recent answers are included