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Would doing the batch import inside a transaction and then rolling it back be a terrible idea? Yes. A 10 minute long transaction would be a disaster. At the very least it pins the log, preventing truncation, causing log growth. But more likely will cause massive outage of the system as everything else blocks behind the locks acquired by this long ...


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Add "Enlist=false" in the connection string of your Membership. connectionString="Data Source=xxx;Initial Catalog=xxx;Persist Security Info=True;User ID=xxx;Password=xxx;Enlist=false" This is my use case: using (TransactionScope tScope = new TransactionScope()) { MembershipCreateStatus createStatus; Membership.CreateUser(model.Email, ...


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The usage is: transactions. Whether that is benefit is more complex. There are more direct ways of achieving transactions - ADO.NET transactions. These are a little awkward to work with (you need to remember to set the transaction on every command), but are very efficient. Transaction scope has the advantage of an ambient transaction; this makes it easier ...


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Are you using transactions at all. If you aren't, then you should be. I personally don't use TransactionScope in any of my NHibernate, but then again I don't need it. In a web environment with a single database, it's not really necessary. my unit of work is a web request. I open my connection on BeginRequest and close it on EndRequest. I use a generic ...


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You are missing out on some beautiful functionality: with the transaction scope in place, the code with the transaction scope will participate in ambient transaction if invoked from inside a piece of code running in its own transaction scope. Without transaction scope, your code will have its own transaction (from the deepest nested block) which could fail ...


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If you are not using any TransactionScope explicitly, every statement you execute on the database will run in a separate transaction. With a TransactionScope you can bundle multiple statements into a big transaction and undo everything as a block. This is necessary, when updating multiple tables in multiple statements but performing virtually one big ...


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In SQL Server 2014 the isolation level for pooled connection is reset when connection is returned to the pool. In earlier versions it is not. See this forum post: "in SQL 2014, for client drivers with TDS version 7.3 or higher, SQL server will reset transaction isolation level to default (read committed) for pooled connections. for clients with TDS ...


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This works: public class Test1 { public int Id { get; set; } public string Name { get; set; } } public class Test2 { public int Id { get; set; } public string Name { get; set; } } public class DC1 : DbContext { public DbSet<Test1> Test1 { get; set; } public DC1(SqlConnection conn) : base(conn, ...


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In SQL Server 2014 / Hekaton this seem to have been fixed. Running on SQL Server version 12.0.2000.8 the output is: ReadCommitted Serializable ReadCommitted Unfortunately this change is not mentioned in any documentation such as: Behavior Changes to Database Engine Features in SQL Server 2014 Breaking Changes to Database Engine Features in SQL Server ...


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Without speaking too much to how TransactionScope works with threads (because I'm ignorant on the matter), the problem has been resolved by creating the scopes during the instantiation of each TestClass. To save a handful of keystrokes, we created a ScopedTestClass class: public class ScopedTestClass : IDisposable { private TransactionScope TxnScope; ...


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I did a web search on How to view ambient transaction status and came up with Transaction.Current property which I put into the watch window. This showed Aborted after one external function call I'd missed completely. Stepping into that I found that I called return; from the function between creating the transaction and committing it hence the abort. Simple ...


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Each connection you open on the server is a distributed entity. By chance, you often get the same physical connection from the connection pool during tests. This is such a nasty behavior because it leads you to not find the problem during testing. This setup behaves in a non-deterministic way regarding the database. In any case you should have distributed ...



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