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1

We can use dcast. Create a sequence column ('ind') by 'ID' and use dcast to reshape from 'long' to 'wide'. library(reshape2) df2 <- transform(df1, ind=paste0('Update', ave(seq_along(ID), ID, FUN=seq_along))) dcast(df2, ID~ind, value.var='Updates') # ID Update1 Update2 #1 101 Open Closed #2 102 Inactive Open EDIT: If we ...


0

You may use de-pivot operator in rapid miner. Just go through its documentation


0

You need 3 lines of lodash: _.merge.apply(null, _.union([{}], myArrayOfObjects, [function (a, b) { return _.compact(_.flatten([a, b])); }])) See the docs of _.merge for more details on what the function does.


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Follow these steps... 1 Click on a cell to the right of your data. On the keyboard press Alt and then while holding Alt down, press D and let go. Now press P on the keyboard. The ancient PivotTable Wizard should now be displayed. 2 Select Multiple Consolidation Ranges. Click on the Next button. 3 Select I will create the page fields. Click on the ...


1

Let's do it with dplyr: library(dplyr) documentdata$Left %>% do.call(rbind, .) %>% do(data.frame(pre = .[["str"]][which(.[["class"]]=="coll")-1], coll = .[["str"]][which(.[["class"]]=="coll")], post = .[["str"]][which(.[["class"]]=="coll")+1])) ...


0

import pandas as pd df = pd.DataFrame({'A': {0: 11, 1: 21, 2: 31}, 'B': {0: 12, 1: 22, 2: 23}, 'C': {0: 31, 1: 32, 2: 33}}) pd.melt(df, value_vars=['A','B','C']) variable value 0 A 11 1 A 21 2 A 31 3 B 12 4 B 22 5 B 23 6 C 31 7 C ...


1

You can use pandas.melt: >>> d a b c 0 11 12 13 1 21 22 23 2 31 32 33 >>> pandas.melt(d.reset_index(), id_vars='index') index variable value 0 0 a 11 1 1 a 21 2 2 a 31 3 0 b 12 4 1 b 22 5 2 b 32 6 0 c 13 7 ...


4

Here is one way using stack(). res = df.stack().reset_index() res.columns = 'row col Val'.split() res row col Val 0 0 a 11 1 0 b 12 2 0 c 13 3 1 a 21 4 1 b 22 5 1 c 23 6 2 a 31 7 2 b 32 8 2 c 33


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library(reshape2) dcast(df, iYear ~ Month, value.var='Sum') Output: iYear 1 2 3 10 11 12 1 1946 NA NA NA 1791 1575 1129 2 1947 823 750 1023 NA NA NA If you want to replace the NAs with zeros: df1 <- dcast(df, iYear ~ Month, value.var='Sum') df1[is.na(df1)] <- 0 iYear 1 2 3 10 11 12 1 1946 0 0 0 ...


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#!/bin/bash aline="$(head -n 1 file.txt)" set -- $aline colNum=$# #set -x while read line; do set -- $line for i in $(seq $colNum); do eval col$i="\"\$col$i \$$i\"" done done < file.txt for i in $(seq $colNum); do eval echo \${col$i} done another version with set eval


1

In base R, you can use reshape(): reshape(df,dir='w',idvar=c('ID','APPT_ID'),timevar='Variable'); ## ID APPT_ID Value.a Value.b Value.c ## 1 1 11 41 42 43 ## 4 1 12 44 45 46 ## 7 2 13 47 48 49 ## 10 3 14 50 51 52 You can use the varying argument to control the names ...


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With reshape2 dcast(df, ID+APPT_ID~Variable, value.var="Value") # ID APPT_ID a b c # 1 1 11 41 42 43 # 2 1 12 44 45 46 # 3 2 13 47 48 49 # 4 3 14 50 51 52


2

I think this will do the job library(tidyr) df %>% spread(Variable, Value)


2

You can think of this as a pivot. If your DataFrame had an extra column called, say, colnum: lap nr time colnum 0 1 2 10 1 1 2 2 100 2 then df.pivot(index='nr', columns='colnum') moves the nr column values into the row index, and the colnum column values into the column index: lap time colnum 1 2 1 ...


2

In short: transposing an array means that NumPy just needs to permute the stride and shape information for each axis: >>> arr.strides (64, 32, 8) >>> arr.transpose(1, 0, 2).strides (32, 64, 8) Notice that the strides for the first and second axes were swapped here. This means that no data needs to be copied; NumPy can simply change how ...


0

As explained in the documentation: By default, reverse the dimensions, otherwise permute the axes according to the values given. So you can pass an optional parameter axes defining the new order of dimensions. E.g. transposing the first two dimensions of an RGB VGA pixel array: >>> x = np.ones((480, 640, 3)) >>> np.transpose(x, ...


3

You can use itertools.zip_longest (in python 3.X zip_longest) with a fillvalue argument to fill the missed item : >>> list(izip_longest(*b,fillvalue=0)) [(1, 4), (2, 5), (3, 0)]


2

You can sometimes use List.take 1/List.drop 1 in place of List.head/List.tail in cases where it can make more sense to get an empty List instead of Nothing. In the example of transpose, if you want to write it such that it will drop any extra values when the lists are not of equal length (i.e. only transpose "as much as it can" depending on the shortest ...


4

It depends... Do you want to do this thoroughly, considering all the edgecases? Or do it the quick and dirty way? What I'm calling an edge-case is a list of lists where the sublists have a different length. Very dirty way In edge-cases you get a program crash unsafeHead l = case l of (h :: t) -> h _ -> Debug.crash "unsafeHead called with ...


1

I have added a new awnser instead of editing my original one to make this more visible (no comment rights unfortunatly). In your own awnser you add an additional requirement not present in the first one: It has to work on ARM Cortex-M I did come up with an alternative solution for ARM in my original awnser but omitted it as it was not part of the question ...


0

If the name always have four value, you can try this select ticket_id , Number, max(case when Name='SSN' then value end) as SSN , max(case when Name='Title' then value end) as Title , max(case when Name='dob' then value end) as dob , max(case when Name='mobile' then value end) as mobile from ( SELECT tkt.ticket_id, tkt.`number`, val.field_id, FF.name, ...


4

Using Only base R, reshape and aggregate will do the trick. reshape(aggregate(ID ~ Facility + MMWR + Age, data = df, length), idvar = c('Facility', 'MMWR'), direction = 'wide', v.name = 'ID', timevar = 'Age')


0

You can do this with aggregate without subsetting and reshape, but I prefer xtabs here. ftable(xtabs(Count~Facility+MMWR+Age,data=transform(df,Count=1))) Age 1 2 3 4 Facility MMWR A 1503 3 0 0 1 1504 1 1 1 1 1505 3 0 0 1 1506 2 2 0 0 B 1503 0 2 2 0 1504 0 ...


0

Here's the code I used to generate the answer; just would like to find something much cleaner and without so much repetition since in reality I'll have many many more groups... Thanks! blah1 = aggregate( ID ~ Facility + MMWR, data = (subset(df, Age == "1")), length) colnames(blah1)[3] = "Age 1" blah2 = aggregate( ID ~ Facility + MMWR, data = (subset(df, ...


3

I've spent more time looking for a solution, and I've found some good ones. The SSE2 way On a modern x86 CPU, transposing a binary matrix can be done very efficiently with SSE2 instructions. Using such instructions it is possible to process a 16×8 matrix. This solution is inspired by this blog post by mischasan and is vastly superior to every suggestion ...



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