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9

Basically, any type constructor * -> * that's covariant in its argument is canonically a functor. Since Applicative f is obviously covariant, so is t for the signature sequenceA :: t (f a) -> f (t a) to make sense, hence the Functor requirement is essentially redundant. But much like with the long-missing-because-unneeded Applicative => Monad ...


6

As I had a little bit of time left, I worked out an example of a Huffman tree, while playing with C# 6.0. It's not optimized (not even by far!), but it works fine as an example. And it will help you to look where your 'challenge' may arise. As my English is far better than my Scandinavian knowledge, I used English naming, I hope you don't mind. First, let's ...


6

We don't know a priori how many "hops" it takes to find a cluster center. So we'll have to do some iteration and check if we've landed on a cluster center: import numpy as np a = np.array([6, 8, 1, -1, 0, 3, -2, 4, -3, 10, 5]) for i in a: mask = a>=0 # We can stop when all the values in `a` are negative if not mask.any(): break # perform ...


5

If you want to exclude element in you find, you can use a not filter. As for example, I've taken you function that exclude element and made it way shorter : $.fn.findExclude = function( Selector, Mask,){ return this.find(Selector).not(this.find(Mask).find(Selector)) } Now, ill be honest with you, I did not fully understand what you want. But, when i ...


5

You're getting confused about operators used in type signatures. Basically, the same rules from Haskell syntax hold for these: first priority is parentheses, second priority is "application", last priority is "operators". So just as you might write: f 3 + g 4 [which in mathematical terms we'd write as f(3) + g(4)], in Haskell there is a flag to enable ...


4

You are very close! You want to add a directive to only grab direct descendants: ">" $('div.wrap').find('> p:not(.no):first').addClass('red'); http://jsfiddle.net/wnewby/HUqR9/


4

Is it possible to traverse std::stack in C++? No. A stack is a data structure you should use when you are interested in placing elements on top and getting elements from the top. If you want an iterable stack, either use a different data structure for a stack role (std::vector?) or write one yourself.


4

You have a few options here: 50 if statements, one for each state, as you are doing. A switch with 999 conditions, matching each option with a state. It probably looks cleaner and you can generate it with a script and interject the return statements wherever necessary. Maybe worse than option 1 in terms of tediousness. Import the file as text, parse it ...


3

The natural data structure for a graph is, well, a graph, i.e. a set of graph elements (nodes) which can refer other elements. Though, for the better cache reuse, the elements can be placed/allocated in an array or arrays (generally, vectors) in order to put neighbor elements as close in memory as possible. Generally, each element or a group of elements ...


3

Well, I really don't want to be answering my own question on a bounty, so if anyone can provide a better or alternative implementation please do.. However, being pressed to complete the project, I ended up working on this quite a bit and came up with a fairly clean jQuery plugin for doing a jQuery.find() style search while excluding child branches from the ...


3

The [data-foo] selector is correct, but you should use it in a filter, instead of in a find: var datas = textInputs.filter('[data-foo]'); See working fiddle here


3

You need to add the parent as Dir.entries doesn't include the target when enumerating its contents. File.directory?(File.join(Repo_dir, folder)) File.join is a platform independent way of adding separators between directories and files. Think of it like Repo_dir + '/' + folder Or Repo_dir + '\' + folder Try this one as well: #!/usr/bin/env ruby ...


3

Walk the tree in any order, keeping the following values: N: the number of nodes seen selected: the currently selected node. Initially, N is 0 and selected is None. Visiting a node consists of the following: Increment N Generate a random integer in the range [0, N). If the random integer selected is 0, set selected to the current Node. Note that the ...


3

You can use closest() to find the related parent element with the given selector. Try this: var argument = $(this).closest('.expandListContent').prev().find('.expandListHeaderRow').attr('ctryid'); You should also note that using non-spec attributes in your HTML will render your page invalid. Use a data-* attribute instead: <div ...


3

Change (binary_tree*) malloc(sizeof(binary_tree*)) to malloc(sizeof(binary_tree)) You want memory for this struct, not memory for a pointer for this struct. And don't cast the value of malloc. This is needed in C++, but you are programming in C where an implicit conversion is doing this for you.


3

ECMAScript 6 has generators. So you can write the function as function *traverse(value) { if (typeof value === "object") { var isArray = Array.isArray(value); for (var prop in value) { if (!isArray) yield prop; yield* traverse(value[prop]); } } else { yield value; } } And use it as: var obj = { 'a': { 'a1': ...


3

Here a simple snippet that would fix your issue LinkedList<String> yourListWithName = new LinkedList<String>(); //Fill your list ListIterator<String> listIterator = yourListWithName.listIterator(); String previous = null; while(listIterator.hasNext()) { if(listIterator.hasPrevious()) { previous = ...


3

You can change to have a common event handler for both events and set the operation depending upon which event it was: $('.client').on("mouseenter mouseleave", function(e) { var method = e.type === "mouseenter" ? "removeClass" : "addClass"; $(this).siblings('.testimonial').find('p')[method]('unseen'); }); Here's an explanation of what's going on: ...


2

I don't think that it is possible to traverse through a stack. The best I can think of is using vector using std::vector using push_back(), pop_back() The stack does not provide a begin or end member function so you cannot use it with a range based for loop which requires both. In your case it would be better to choose some other data structure if you ...


2

One possible solution: $(':not(div[class^="ok"]) + div[class^="ok"]').each(function() { $(this).nextUntil(':not(div[class^="ok"])') .addBack() .wrapAll('<div class="wrapper"></div>'); }); DEMO: http://jsfiddle.net/7hABQ/18/


2

There is no direct way to do this, the traversal endpoints are all single-node. You can do it by using the Batch API, sending lots of traversal requests in a single HTTP request. Have a look here: http://docs.neo4j.org/chunked/stable/rest-api-batch-ops.html However For the Traversal you are running, you could easily express it in Cypher, and then you'd ...


2

Add 1 to both array indexes each time through the loop. Stop looping when m reaches width - 1 or n reaches height - 1.


2

Your questions: Think of any_old_process that has to traverse a graph and do some work on the objects it finds, including adding more work. ... what data structure can be parallelised to achieve the goals set out in the question? Quoted questions: Some stuff about garbage collection. Since you are specifically interested in parallelizing graph ...


2

I'll try to give it a shot. Imagine a tree a b c d e f g Each letter represents a Node object. What happens when you pass in the 'a' node is that it will look at the first left node and find 'b'. It will then call the same method on 'b' and wait until that returns In 'b' it will look for the first left node and ...


2

Something like this? // find closure Set<Node> nodes = new HashSet<>(); for (Node n : inputs) { for (Relationship rel : n.getRelationships()) { nodes.add(r.getOtherNode(n)); } } nodes.addAll(inputs); // find rels withing closure Set<Relationship> rels = new HashSet<>(); for (Node n : nodes) { for (Relationship rel : ...


2

The combinator you want is supposed to use 2 Traversals simultaneously. But that kind of combinator breaks Traversal laws in general, in particular the "no duplication" law: a Traversal should traverse each element only once. Here's an example of what you probably don't want: >>> (1, 2) ^.. bothParts _1 _1 [1, 1] To be more precise, I'd like ...


2

We'll take as reference the following recursive model import Data.List (minimumBy) import Data.Ord (comparing) import Data.Tree -- | Follows a path into a 'Tree' returning steps in the path which -- are not contained in the 'Tree' treeTail :: Eq a => [a] -> Tree a -> [a] treeTail [] _ = [] treeTail (a:as) (Node ...


2

First, please let's use type Label = String. String is not exactly descriptive and might not be ideal in the end... Now. To use Traversable, you need to pick a suitable Applicative that can contain the information you need for deciding what to do in its "structure". You only need to pass back information after a match has failed. That sounds like some ...


2

Solution: I am going to answer your base question "Attach javscript/jquery event on dynamically created elements". For adding event on dynamically created elements you have to take advantage or Event Delegation, when a event trigger on an element it propagates. So if you attach event handler on a root element( it can be body or any parent element which is ...


2

If I understand you: understanding your needs better and applying the specific classes you need, I think this is the syntax will work: var targetsOfTopGroups = $('.InterfaceGroup .Interface:not(.Interface .Interface):not(.Interface .InterfaceGroup)') This Fiddle is an attempt to reproduce your scenario. Feel free to play around with it. I think I ...



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